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August 23, 2006

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BAND OF THE WEEK: SNOWDEN

Hometown: Atlanta, Ga.
Members: Jordan Jeffares (guitar, keys, vocals), Chandler Rentz (drums, vocals), Corinne Lee (bass, keys, vocals), David Payne (guitar)
Fun Fact: At Snowden’s last show in Indianapolis, the band played for a bartender and five people. Payment came in the form of shots.
Why They’re Worth Watching: The band members are young, but Snowden fuses brooding melancholic lyrics and lush, expansive soundscapes with precision and maturity.
For Fans Of: Joy Division, Interpol, Starflyer 59

Two years ago, Snowden frontman Jordan Jeffares couldn’t imagine his musical career reaching beyond the confines of his Athens, Ga. apartment. A senior at the University of Georgia, Jeffares spent his last year of college a recluse to society in almost complete isolation. After devoting most of his time to studying and writing the music that would eventually evolve into his band’s set list, Jeffares recruited a gang of musical Atlanta suburbanites, and Snowden, deriving its name from Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, began to materialize beyond the written page.

Acclaimed for its dark, lush atmospherics draped over precise, post-punk-inspired guitar work and Jeffares’ deep, brooding vocals, the band has drawn heavy New York media attention. Fans are usually surprised at the band’s Dixie roots. “We definitely are not a Southern rock band,” Jeffares clarifies. “People want to be able to describe things, and it’s very easy to get pigeon-holed because people want things to be understandable and to be able to lump things into a category.” Snowden’s first full-length release, Anti-Anti, sees the band taking cues from bands like The Cure and Radiohead, without mimicking their music. “One of the things I love about these bands is their continual sound progression,” says Jeffares. “On this album, I try and jump all over the place, make each song completely different and never cross my tracks again.”

Some will classify the band as post-shoegaze, but Snowden aims to defy the concept of genre, choosing instead to preserve its independent integrity and strict DIY ethic. “If we have to be called a certain genre or we have to be related to the same bands over and over again, that’s fine for a while, because no one knows who we are,” says Jeffares. “But hopefully we’ll get out of that and be able to stand on our own.”

PUBLICATION
Paste

AUTHOR
Margaret Price

DIRECT LINK TO ARTICLE
http://www.pastemagazine.com