Settle Down City

The three members of YOUNG WIDOWS emerged from the dissolution of BREATHER RESIST with a new vision steeped in dark, brooding grooves and moody post-punk. From the reverb-drenched inspiration of Regulator Watts/Hoover to the bass and drums lock-groove perfected by Shellac and the Jesus Lizard, YOUNG WIDOWS gladly wears influences on its sleeve. The signature inventive guitar work of vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson (Black Cross, The National Acrobat) is at its peak here, while the rhythm section of Nick Thieneman and Geoff Paton lays down syrup-thick grooves, recalling Pacific Northwest heavyweights (think Melvins, Karp, even Nirvana), and British post-punk, ala Gang Of Four. Settle Down City (JT1119) contains 11 songs of hypnotic, heavy, noise-rock anthems.

Vinyl is available through .

RECORDED AND MIXED BY C. OWENS AT HEAD BANGIN’ KILL YOUR MOMMA MUSIC, LOUISVILLE, KY, THE FIRST THROUGH THE SIXTEENTH OF APRIL TWO THOUSAND SIX. BETSY ASSISTED. MASTERED BY ALAN DOUCHES AT WEST WEST SIDE.

STEVE SINDONI SANG ON “GLAD HE ATE HER” AND HE ALSO WROTE THE LINE “THOSE LIARS THOSE BASTARDS THEIR SEED IS SPILLING FASTER.” OWENS SANG ON THE END OF “GLAD HE ATE HER” WITH STEVE. DAVID BROOKS YELLED DO WHAT YOU WANT ON “ALMOST D-BEAT.” CASEY BUCK SANG “NEXT TIME THINGS WILL BE BETTER” ON “MIRRORFUCKER.” RYAN PATTERSON SANG “A-I-R” ON “THE FIRST HALF.” STEPHEN GEORGE, BILL BISIG, DAVID BROOKS, DUNCAN CHERRY, SEAN ROBERTS, JASON ELBER, RYAN PATTERSON, AND ROB PENNINGTON SAID “WE DON’T KNOW” VERY LOUDLY . KELLEY COX CAME UP WITH OUR NAME. DRAWING BY D. SNODGRASS. TITLES PAINTED BY EVAN PATTERSON. LAYOUT BY RYAN PATTERSON / AUXILIARY. THANKS. ALL SONGS COPYRIGHT 2006 YOUNG WIDOWS. C & P JADE TREE 2006 / JT1119. WWW.YOUNGWIDOWS.NET

1. Settle Down City
2. Almost Dead Beat
3. Glad He Ate Her
4. Small Talk
5. Formererer
6. Bruised Knees
7. Mirrorfucker
8. The Charmers
9. New Forest
10. The First Half
11. We Don’t Know

YOUNG WIDOWS JOIN MODERN LIFE IS WAR FOR MIDWEST TOUR


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YOUNG WIDOWS will be joining MODERN LIFE IS WAR for a string of Midwest tour dates starting this Friday. All dates are listed below.

Always check the for complete and current info.

9/8 – 9/17 with Modern Life is War

09/08/2007 Indianapolis, IN @ Harrison Center
09/09/2007 Chicago, IL @ Beat Kitchen
09/10/2007 Milwaukee, WI @ Shorewood Legion Hall
09/11/2007 Cedar Falls, IA @ The Reverb
09/12/2007 Minneapolis, MN @ Triple Rock Social Club
09/14/2007 Sioux Falls, SD @ Nutty’s North
09/15/2007 Omaha, NB @ American Legion Post 1
09/17/2007 St. Louis, MO @ Creepy Crawl

Settle Down City is out and available on , and in digital form from , , , , , , , and .

The vinyl version of Settle Down City was released on

Track Listing:
1. Settle Down City
2. Almost Dead Beat
3. Glad He Ate Her
4. Small Talk
5. Formererer
6. Bruised Knees
7. Mirrorfucker
8.
9. New Forest
10. The First Half
11. We Don’t Know

YOUNG WIDOWS ON TOUR NOW


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YOUNG WIDOWS have set out on another tour, which includes dates with THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES, Russian Circles, and Pelican. The tour will make a stop in Austin for the . All dates are listed below. Always check the for complete and current info.

Tour dates:

3/5 – 3/21 with Russian Circles, Pelican
3/17 – 3/19 with These Arms Are Snakes, Russian Circles, and Pelican

03/05/2007 DeKalb, IL United States @ The House Cafe – Illinois
03/06/2007 Ann Arbor, MI United States @ Blind Pig
03/07/2007 Toledo, OH United States @ Headliners
03/08/2007 Covington, KY United States @ Mad Hatter
03/09/2007 Louisville, KY United States @ St. John’s Center
03/10/2007 Nashville, TN United States @ Exit In
03/11/2007 Atlanta, GA United States @ Drunken Unicorn
03/12/2007 Birmingham, AL United States @ Bottletree Cafe
03/13/2007 Baton Rouge, LA United States @ Spanish Moon
03/14/2007 Houston, TX United States @ Walter’s on Washington
03/15/2007 Austin, TX United States @ Emo’s
03/15/2007 Austin, TX United States @ Lambert’s (Jade Tree SXSW Showcase)
03/17/2007 Fort Worth, TX United States @ Ridglea Theater
03/18/2007 Oklahoma, OK United States @ Conservatory
03/19/2007 Springfield, MO United States @ Outland Ballroom
03/20/2007 Kansas City, MO United States @ Record Bar
03/21/2007 Iowa City, IA United States @ The Picador

The three members of YOUNG WIDOWS emerged from the dissolution of BREATHER RESIST with a new vision steeped in dark, brooding grooves and moody post-punk. From the reverb-drenched inspiration of Regulator Watts/Hoover to the bass and drums lock-groove perfected by Shellac and the Jesus Lizard, YOUNG WIDOWS gladly wears influences on its sleeve. The signature inventive guitar work of vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson (Black Cross, The National Acrobat) is at its peak here, while the rhythm section of Nick Thieneman (also of Black Cross) and Geoff Paton lays down syrup-thick grooves, recalling Pacific Northwest heavyweights (think Melvins, Karp, even Nirvana), and British post-punk, ala Gang Of Four. (JT1119), their Jade Tree debut, contains 11 songs of hypnotic, heavy, noise-rock anthems.

Settle Down City is out now and available in digital form from , , , , , , , and .

The vinyl version of Settle Down City is available from

Track Listing:
1. Settle Down City
2. Almost Dead Beat
3. Glad He Ate Her
4. Small Talk
5. Formererer
6. Bruised Knees
7. Mirrorfucker
8.
9. New Forest
10. The First Half
11. We Don’t Know

YOUNG WIDOWS [I]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/I] REVIEW

Rating: 7.8

Young Widows are pretty much former Jade Tree band Breather Resist without the vocalist, but you can barely tell. Are they still indebted to the Jesus Lizard? Sure. Just listen to the queasy, seasick guitar lines in the title track or "Glad He Ate Her" (see what they did there?) to find that same oppressive head-bob rhythm between galloping drums and sludgy bass. But they’ve learned a whole lot of patience and found at least a couple other bands to rip off, making Settle Down City a thoughtful and more original record– if a little less manic– with far more potential than their former band. Don’t sleep on this late-2006 album like I nearly did; the halls of nu-pigfuck are beset with obstacles, and it might be only these three penitent men who pass.

For one, the vocals of Evan Patterson are much calmer, recalling the flat, ominous delivery of early June of 44. That’s exactly who they remind me of– albeit a nastier version– on the opening title track, when after a few bars of pounding the downbeat with Neanderthal drumming and a bass tone that hits like a bowling ball dropped in mud, everything recedes for guitar plinking and some idle warnings from the singer ("Why’d you come around, the city left you/ Should have settled down…"), just before more furious grinding.

The production is dry, truer to those mid-1990s grails, and rather than the middling distortion tone of Breather Resist, the guitars have more of a free-floating echo above the din, crunchy but clear. Songs like "Small Talk" are less riffing and more incidental noise, punching in and out of the verses with an almost dub-like abruptness and ghostly reverb. Meanwhile, that starkness gives room for drummer Geoff Paton to stomp like a fuming animal over tracks like "Formererer" and makes moments like the staccato full-band thwack at the finale of "Bruised Knees" that much scarier.

While the tempo and tone get pretty homogenous, save for some backing vocals on "Mirrorfucker", Settle Down City is consistently dynamic and surprising, from the title track’s twists and turns to the many change-ups and fake-outs of tracks like "Glad He Ate Her" and "Formererer". Young Widows borrow from a narrow selection of influences, but it’s forced them to come up with a stronger– and uglier– result. It may not step too far out of the shadow of its heroes, but it is taking a step. Either way, it’s a worthy entry to an undermined corner of the underground.

YOUNG WIDOWS [I]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/I] REVIEW

Late on in 2005, upon loosing their singer, the remaining three members of
Louisville’s Breather Resist decided to press onward under a new alias.
Playing in a similar vein, the trio pummels through an eardrum splintering
mix of bass and drum heavy Chicago post-hardcore, 70’s full stack Southern
sludge, and angular D.C. dissonance.  With guitarist Evan Patterson holding
down vocal duties the band looses the cornball hardcore growl that hindered
them during their run with Breather, but the David Yow styling makes the
long-standing Jesus Lizard comparison even more unavoidable. While Young
Widow’s influential sources are far from inconspicuous, they do what they do
exceptionally well.  Inciting a maniacal head bangers ball at all times,
both their relentless intensity and precision make for a crushing listening
experience. The recording techniques of Chris Owens (Lords) often give off
the impression that your listening to the band play in a bomber hanger and
help to magnify an already monstrous sound. If you’re into any of the
previously mentioned genres and the bands that defined them, this one will
get your blood moving. (BM)

YOUNG WIDOWS [I]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/I] REVIEW

Me likey, me really, really likey.

Sounding like the bastard offspring of early Jawbox and The Blood Brothers, Young Widows takes a darker turn with panache’. Post-hardcore rock never sounded so crisp and dissonant, to the end that this album lives and breathes with a life all of its own. YW just owns this music, grabbing the listener by the throat with an ardor and zeal unsurpassed in today’s scene.

Production beautifully captures the passion and violence, packing more energy into each track than seems humanly possible; all profit from a deft guiding hand. Vocals, while monotonous, carry significance and drive, never-ceasing to captivate. Guitars work overtime to weave sense and nonsense into each song creating some very interesting pieces. Distorted bass features as a central point and it gives consistency and structure to the melee’ – and gives me great flashbacks of Girls Against Boys style lines. Drums benefit the most from production as the fierce pounding is brought forward and then reined in to manifest into this divine juggernaut of an entity.

This genre is a hard one to nail. Through the spectrums you can always go "too" one way; too discordant, too heavy or too artsy – among others. But it seems with YW that they have perfected some scientific way of determining the exact center of the arc of sound to hit that sweet spot, accomplishing what has rarely been seen before. Bravo.

Almost every song is buzz worthy and different, creating a masterpiece of a record from back to front, although I will continue to come back for such greats as "Formererer", "Mirrorfucker" and "New Forest" – tracks that just slap me silly every time I listen to them. Rarely will I say this, so listen closely: Go get this album now.

YOUNG WIDOWS [I]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/I] REVIEW

Late 2005 saw the disbanding of hardcore favorites Breather Resist following the departure of vocalist Steve Sindoni. The decision to no longer play old songs in Sindoni’s absence led to the official end of Breather Resist and the beginning of Young Widows. The new name was more than just a re-organization, it was a step in a different musical direction, as Young Widows takes a step back from the hardcore Breather Resist sound, and a step into the uncharted territory of noise rock.

Alright, so maybe their new path isn’t exactly unbeaten. It’s no secret that the band draws heavily on noise rock heavyweights the Jesus Lizard for musical influences. The gritty, driving bass lines and less than melodic guitar work bare quite a resemblance. They’re not ashamed to admit it, with the third track on Settle Down City, "Glad He Ate Her," being a clear nod to the Jesus Lizard’s "Gladiator." With the mix of the Jesus Lizard influence and some of the leftover intensity of Breather Resist, Settle Down City often resembles some of the more experimental leanings of Suicide Note’s last effort, Too Sick To Dance (Forever Fucked). On the whole, it’s a solid release by some veteran musicians under a new moniker.

The only downside to Settle Down City is the lack of consistent album pace. After the slower tempo intro title track, the first half of the disc moves ahead with determination. The early up-tempo tracks are propelled forward by noisy bass and pounding drums, and are complimented by the monotone yells of guitarist Evan Patterson. Bassist Nick Thieneman shares some of the vocal duties, and even Sindoni makes a singing appearance on "Glad He Ate Her." However, the second half of Settle Down City often succumbs to moments of lethargy, most notably during the dragging verses of "The Charmers" and the slow paced "New Forest." I understand that the noise rock genre is often on the experimental side of the game, but I strongly prefer the faster tracks on this album.

The production on this album is crisp enough to capture the meandering guitar work, dirty bass lines and hammering drums, yet it doesn’t alter the band’s overall raw style. Having had the pleasure of witnessing Young Widows’ live show, I’m quite pleased with the accuracy of their recorded sound on Settle Down City.

Bottom Line: While Young Widows may be three-fourths of Breather Resist, Settle Down City displays a new musical direction for these guys. I’m afraid that some fans will cry "Jesus Lizard worship" before giving this album a chance, although they wouldn’t actually be that far off base. This disc has some dull moments, but it’s still a good release that should find a home in any noise rock fan’s CD collection.

20 GREAT ALBUMS YOU DIDN’T HEAR IN 2006

11. Young Widows – Settle Down City (Jade Tree)
Those waiting for Drive Like Jehu and the Jesus Lizard to reunite need to come to terms with the fact that it’s never going to happen. But, if you insist on waiting in vain then be sure to grab a copy of Settle Down City to tide you over. Singer/guitarist Evan Patterson’s ashtray of a voice and extremely loud, jagged, feedback drenched guitar slabs reign in plenty of elastic, post hardcore with waves of arty tension like At the Drive-In gone criminally insane. This Louisville combo puts the power back in "power trio."

YOUNG WIDOWS LIVE REVIEW

These Arms are Snakes, Mouth of the Architect, Young Widows
The Living Room in Providence, RI
November 1, 2006

The crowd was pretty dead for the show when we first walked in. I was pretty surprised at this due to the awesomeness of the line up. Regardless, I knew I was gonna have a good time.

I don’t know the name of the first band that played, nor do I really care to. They played generic and boring metal with both melodic and screaming vocals. Some of the riffs were decent, but I wasn’t impressed. I spent their set watching the Celtics game, which kept me from walking around restlessly bored.

I was really looking forward to seeing Young Widows. I’ve always been a big Breather Resist fan, especially live, and I was expecting Young Widows to impress me as well. They did not disappoint me at all. They sounded like a lighter and more accessible Breather Resist, which I really enjoyed. All of the odd time signatures were there, but they weren’t as intense (which I liked better) or screamy. They three dudes in the band managed to sound loud as hell, and the singer/guitarist was pretty damn funny, though in a monotone and nonchalant way. I was very impressed with Young Widows.

Mouth of the Architect was pretty damn awesome. They only played three songs, but those three songs took about a half hour, and were full of epic and intense songs. They were slow but very energetic. Watching them reminded me of the time I saw High on Fire, dozed off and had all these crazy few second long hallucinigations. The same exact thing happened during Mouth of the Architect’s set. These guys were aweome, and a band that I want to see again soon.

As much as I like These Arms are Snakes, I had to wake up early and needed to get sleep. I’m sure they played a great set, and I’m bummed that I missed them.

YOUNG WIDOWS JOIN THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES ON THE ROAD


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Having just arrived from their European tour, YOUNG WIDOWS are back on the road here at home. This time, the band is joining THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES for the next few weeks, including the . The dates are listed below. Always check the for complete and current info.

10/20/2006 Chicago, IL @ Beat Kitchen
10/21/2006 Milwaukee, WI @ The Cactus Club
10/22/2006 Ann Arbor, MI @ Blind Pig
10/24/2006 Cleveland Hts, OH @ Grog Shop
10/25/2006 Hamilton, ON Canada @ The Underground
10/26/2006 Toronto, ON Canada @ Fun Haus
10/27/2006 Ottawa, ON Canada @ Babylon
10/28/2006 Montreal, QC Canada @ Petit Campus
10/29/2006 Cambridge, MA @ The Middle East
10/31/2006 Hamden, CT @ The Space – Conneticut
11/01/2006 Providence, RI @ The Living Room
11/02/2006 Philadelphia, PA @ First Unitarian Church
11/03/2006 Brooklyn, NY @ North Six
11/04/2006 Washington, DC @ Black Cat Backstage
11/05/2006 Greensboro, NC @ Greene Street
11/06/2006 W. Columbia, SC @ New Brookland Tavern
11/07/2006 Atlanta, GA @ Drunken Unicorn

The three members of YOUNG WIDOWS emerged from the dissolution of BREATHER RESIST with a new vision steeped in dark, brooding grooves and moody post-punk. From the reverb-drenched inspiration of Regulator Watts/Hoover to the bass and drums lock-groove perfected by Shellac and the Jesus Lizard, YOUNG WIDOWS gladly wears influences on its sleeve. The signature inventive guitar work of vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson (Black Cross, The National Acrobat) is at its peak here, while the rhythm section of Nick Thieneman (also of Black Cross) and Geoff Paton lays down syrup-thick grooves, recalling Pacific Northwest heavyweights (think Melvins, Karp, even Nirvana), and British post-punk, ala Gang Of Four. (JT1119), their Jade Tree debut, contains 11 songs of hypnotic, heavy, noise-rock anthems.

Settle Down City is out now and available in digital form from , , , , , , , and .

The vinyl version of Settle Down City is available from

Track Listing:
1. Settle Down City
2. Almost Dead Beat
3. Glad He Ate Her
4. Small Talk
5. Formererer
6. Bruised Knees
7. Mirrorfucker
8.
9. New Forest
10. The First Half
11. We Don’t Know

YOUNG WIDOWS [I]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/I] REVIEW

This is the new side project of members from Breather Resist. Havinig not heard Breather Resist, my review of Young Widows will not be tainted by my impressions on the earlier act. However, Young Widows start off their “Settle Down City” in much the same way that a snowball first gains speed. This is done by creating interesting instrumental arrangements during the title / opening track, insinuating a set of vocals a little latter, and then finally laying down a shambling beast of drums and guitars over the previous layers.

There are a number of different genres that Young Widows pull from. This is not just bringing a noisy rock style to the fore, but there are hints of anarchist punk, acid rock and other genres all present in each note that the band creates. More important bands in these genres, such as Sonic Youth and Husker Du, can be heard in the band’s output as well. The tracks may be distinguished on the actual back of the album, but the fact is that Young Widows strings together the songs to the point that the album could be taken as a full symphony, with each of the tracks representing different movements. The strung out guitars of a track like “Glad He Ate Her” is reminiscent of At The Drive-In, even as the rambling vocals on the track follow along that same path.

At some point, there is never a doubt that Young Widows are anything less than consummate musicians. The tracks may never make it big on pop radio, but for a band that creates melody out of something very chaotic, Young Widows are at the head of their class. Young Widows are trying to tell a story with this album, but I am unsure what story they are trying to tell. There are lyrics, but the vocals are screamed out or the lyrics rendered incomprehensible due to some nuance on the band or the disc’s part. This is the perfect example of an album that will take a considerable toll on anyone that is focusing in. The compositions are never intuitive, and each song here is layered to hell and back. The thirty-five minutes of this CD feels three or four times longer than it is, due to the complexity and density with which Young Widows imbue each track on this disc. For any true music fan, “Settle Down City” is a magical ride.

Top Tracks: Glad He Ate Her, Settle Down City

Rating: 6.5/10

YOUNG WIDOWS [i]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/i] REVIEW

When vocalist Steve Sindoni quit Breather Resist last year, the remaining members decided to continue the band as a three-piece, though they would no longer perform their old songs. But after they were done writing and recording their new album, it was obvious that the band could no longer be considered Breather Resist, as the sound had changed so much. In a move that really deserves some praise, they dropped the name and became Young Widows, to mark an entirely new beginning.

Shying away from their tendencies that drew lazy comparisons to Botch, Young Widows are working in a totally different area. Their mercilessly in-step rhythms and harsh tones recall a time when the Jesus Lizard ruled the indie underground. An unmistakable nod is given to that seminal band with “Glad He Ate Her,” which shares a slyly similar title and song structure to the Lizard’s “Gladiator.” One can speculate that Sindoni quit due to a lack of interest in the new sound, as the rest of the band has clearly been on a steady diet of Jesus Lizard, Shellac, and others. While there are a few moments that would have sounded at home on Breather Resist’s last full-length, Charmer, Settle Down City shouldn’t even be thought of as a continuation from that album.

For much of the album, bassist Nick Thieneman and drummer Geoff Paton provide the solid rock for these songs to rest on, while Evan Patterson wrestles his guitar into the stratospheres of noise. He manages to make his tone both off-putting and inviting, through the bursts of melody he puts over the top of everything. One of the most underrated guitarists in the country, Evan Patterson is at his best yet on Settle Down City. But that doesn’t mean the rest of the band just plays second fiddle. Thieneman’s bass is very driving and present, and Paton’s drumming is so precise, there’s no need for him to be showy. He’s unstoppable.

Settle Down City was recorded by Lords frontman Chris Owens, and it’s doubtful that there could have been a better person for the job. The record makes quite a racket, yet every note comes through perfectly. The vocals, handled mostly by Patterson with contribution from Thieneman, are the most unconventional aspect of the album. Instead of trying to copy David Yow’s “shove the mic down the throat” trick, Owens seems to have placed the two in a room with the mic about 15 feet away from them. It creates a really neat effect, one that is missing from the mountains of pristinely produced garbage coming out these days. Owens also sequences the tracks so that when one song ends, the next song begins a split millisecond after it. It can be a jarring experience, and that was probably the intention.

It really is bold for Young Widows to put out an album like this in 2006. They’re not tring to play into any kind of a money-making scene that puts style over substance. This band is made up of three guys who love this kind of music, and want to play it because they love it. They’ve created an ugly, untamable beast of a band, literally daring you to catch it. Once you do, you’ll understand.

YOUNG WIDOWS [I]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/I] REVIEW

You could see this coming. You could see it from miles away if you listened closely and or fanatically collected the 7"s and albums from Young Widows previous incarnation as the unapologetically loud and noisy Breather Resist. The last 7" that they released, Full of Tongues, showcased a noisier but less loud sound to go along with their lock tight rhythms. That teaser of a record was a breath of fresh air that showed immense progression during the short, but prolific lifetime of the band. When Breather Resist transformed into Young Widows, the direction, that this new incarnation would take, was a bit of a mystery.

Settle Down City is the result of said transformation. It follows the direction of the Full of Tongues record almost directly. In reality, one of the songs from it ended up in a revamped form on this album; so, the progression is given a concrete bond. This is a superb, noisy album. The production is very Albini-esque, which given the obvious influence of The Jesus Lizard and Shellac on the writing, actually benefits the overall sound of the album. It sounds urgent. It sounds very now.

From the beginning signaled by a dog bark, Settle Down City churns out wonderfully noisy songs that are grating, but infectiously so. The ugly cover art seems to embody or represent the sound well. This is truly the type of album where one needs to experience as a whole: the music, the packaging, and the vocals. Settle Down City comes across as a conversation or book where there are memorable lines but you miss the point or only get part of the picture by listening to individual songs and or skipping around from track to track. The album also demands to be listened to at high volumes. There are little sounds and noises that you miss when the volume is too low.

The title track gives a tantalizing look into what the rest of the album has to offer. The discordant guitars and pounding rhythm propelled by the fuzzed out bass giving way to quiet passages and lulls that allow one to recover from the aural beatings. The simplistic repetition in the vocals does not impede on the sound but augments in a way that I could liken to a town crier from a bygone era. "Settle Down City" seamlessly shifts into "Almost Dead Beat.” The guitar changes MOs enough to really show how angular a riff can be (this opening guitar riff is oddly catchy); the rhythm section is locked in and gives the backdrop that the guitars need to color the track’s sound. "Glad He Ate Her" is the song from Full of Tongues (it was originally titled "Stain Sheets"). The music is similar to the original version with changes in the lyrics (while still keeping a line from the original set). It contains one of the loosest guitar riffs ever, and it contrasts nicely with the steady as she goes bass line and drum pattern.

"Small Talk" employs a chunky bass line to hold down the song as the vocalists engage in a call and answer war that inhabits a portion of the track. "Mirrorfucker" is a great song. The slide guitar gives the song a great riff. The main rhythm part is punishing. It has a great groove to it. The female sounding vocals lend an unsettling effect to the song. Young Widows crams a lot of substance into the barely three minutes of the track before it pounds its way into "The Charmers.” This song has another great groove to it. The drums hold down everything as the guitar and bass just go off. There are some off time tempos that the band utilizes in this song. When the guitar and bass drop off for the vocals and drums to come to the forefront, the song reaches a fever like pitch that is accented by short bursts from the silent instruments. "New Forest" is a more laid back track that gives you a chance to settle down after the pace of the preceding two songs. It has this really great, tiny yell in here that makes the song.

"The First Half" is a fast paced track. It has a whirlwind quality to it. The instruments don’t stop; they simply glide from part to part without break to keep the frantic feeling going through the end. The chant of "A-I-R" is kind of out there in the effect it has on the song. Settle Down City closes with "We Don’t Know." It has a deceptively relaxed feel. It is more of a stewing brood mood. The group chant, from which the song acquires its title, which closes it all out is unnerving and a perfect end.

To be one hundred percent honest, I don’t think that there has been a record like this in a while. Settle Down City draws the listener in with great grooves and infectious rhythms. It challenges with gratingly jangled guitars that continually push the envelope of what to expect from where Young Widows left off with their previous incarnation. The vocals act like another instrument that emphasizes musical passages and put the exclamation point on parts of the conversation. I highly recommend this to any fan of the noisier side of music.

9.0 / 10

YOUNG WIDOWS [i]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/i] REVIEW

Settle Down City is the harsh result of Kentucky’s Breather Resist losing its singer and changing its name to Young Widows. The cacophony that got shat out the other side is a glorious one; the album is an ear assault on the same plane as the now-trio’s former band, but shows the group’s experimental side as well. Rumbling drones and galloping rhythmatics are less metal than the band’s previous incarnation, and sometimes sound like a stop-start worship of the much-missed Jesus Lizard (one track here is called "Glad He Ate Her," a nod to the Liz’s "Gladiator"). Vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson is no David Yow, and we don’t expect him to be; instead, Patterson drawls out a tortured yelp here and a powerful shout there (with help from bassist Nick Thieneman). Some of the wallowing in the mud will also please those who enjoy later-era Black Flag or the Rollins solo stuff. Mostly though, Young Widows concentrates on delivering what is one of the best groove-laden noise rock records in quite some time. One highlight is the floored ass-shaker "Small Talk."

YOUNG WIDOWS [i]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/i] REVIEW

Taken at the member level, Louisville’s Young Widows are basically the second coming of the defunct Breather Resist, since everyone but singer Steve Sindoni is present. But one listen to Settle Down City, Young Widows’ debut for Jade Tree, and it’s pretty apparent that the name change was warranted: this is a new band with a new sound. Not that the two bands couldn’t share a bill together, but the Young Widows trio is a step removed from the metallic hardcore chaos of Breather with their noise rock-inspired post-punk grooves. They take a lot of cues from bands like the Jesus Lizard, and consequently, fans of such will find much to like here (take special note of "Glad He Ate Her," whose title is more than coincidental). The guys love distortion and reverb, with songs like "Formerer," the vocal freak-out "The First Half," and the confrontational "Almost Dead Beat" thriving on it amidst discordant playing where instruments and vocals all crash off each other to land in a wonderful musical heap on the floor. But nothing is just plain noisy; there is always solid playing to guide each note along. Evan Patterson’s guitar work remains excellent as always, and he takes over main vocals with more of a cathartic yell than a harsh hardcore growl. Its effect doesn’t knock listeners over on impact, but coupled with the bashing drums of Geoff Paton and throbbing basslines of Nick Thieneman, the emotionally charged sonic attack of Young Widows is as unsettling as it is compelling.

YOUNG WIDOWS "SETTLE DOWN CITY" CD (JT1119) OUT TODAY


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The three members of YOUNG WIDOWS emerged from the dissolution of BREATHER RESIST with a new vision steeped in dark, brooding grooves and moody post-punk. From the reverb-drenched inspiration of Regulator Watts/Hoover to the bass and drums lock-groove perfected by Shellac and the Jesus Lizard, YOUNG WIDOWS gladly wears influences on its sleeve. The signature inventive guitar work of vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson (Black Cross, The National Acrobat) is at its peak here, while the rhythm section of Nick Thieneman (also of Black Cross) and Geoff Paton lays down syrup-thick grooves, recalling Pacific Northwest heavyweights (think Melvins, Karp, even Nirvana), and British post-punk, ala Gang Of Four. (JT1119), their Jade Tree debut, contains 11 songs of hypnotic, heavy, noise-rock anthems.

Settle Down City is out today and available in digital form from , , , , , , , and .

YOUNG WIDOWS are also preparing to embark on a European tour with Akimbo. Check out the for full info.

The vinyl version of Settle Down City is available from

Track Listing:
1. Settle Down City
2. Almost Dead Beat
3. Glad He Ate Her
4. Small Talk
5. Formererer
6. Bruised Knees
7. Mirrorfucker
8.
9. New Forest
10. The First Half
11. We Don’t Know

YOUNG WIDOWS [I] SETTLE DOWN CITY [/I] REVIEW

I wasn’t all that disappointed upon hearing the news that Breather Resist had called it a day after the departure of their singer, as the formation of Young Widows was mentioned in the same post. With Settle Down City, the influence of their former band is apparent, but Young Widows aren’t a carbon copy of what they were doing before.

While remaining heavy, Young Widows toned down the screaming, letting the chaos of their songwriting become the main draw of attention. The rhythm section lay down some great grooves for guitarist/singer Evan Patterson add his own bits of creation, both with his six string and his voice.

This is a pretty good album, which has come to be expected with a musical line up such as Young Widows. The songs are tight, intricate and well written. They are stepping outside of the box, and it paid off nicely.

YOUNG WIDOWS [i]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/i] REVIEW

From its recorded-in-a-Cold-War-bunker ambience to the way the fingernails-down-a-blackboard guitars hover just around the point of collapse into cacophony, Settle Down City couldn’t be more Steve Albini if it donned a pair of spectacles and went on a crusade to upset pretty much anyone with a pulse. In the blurb surrounding the album, the inevitable claim is that Louisville’s Young Widows are a new band with a new sound yadda yadda yadda, but whilst there will be something achingly familiar herein to everyone with a hankering for feedback and general noisemaking, Young Widows are as tight as a drum and have already found their feet for toe-poking the inner ear with some boss tuneage. Which is probably nothing less than you’d expect from guitarist/vocalist Evan Patterson—his curriculum vitae features scenester faves Breather Resist, Black Cross and the National Acrobat.

Consequently, underneath the wailing guitars and gnashing of noise-rock teeth, this is one hell of a cool and confident recording. The spaced-out grooves of "Almost Dead Beat" crackle in such experienced hands, whilst the acidic insight into the minds of David Yow and those kooky cats the Melvins on "Mirrorfucker" throws up a fine barrage of noise that, in terms of execution and songwriting, dampens down any accusations of plagiarism. Now, who’ll give us odds on the acerbic Albini himself twiddling the knobs next time around?

YOUNG WIDOWS [i]SETTLE DOWN CITY[/i] REVIEW

Forming from the dismemberment of Breather Resist, Young Widows revels in some abrasive, loud (sometimes noise) rock world populated by the Jesus Lizard and the National Acrobat (and seeing as vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson played in the latter, it’s not surprising). Sometimes slowing things down to a near drone, Settle Down City never really settles for long as things stay angstily frantic.

YOUNG WIDOWS "SETTLE DOWN CITY" CD (JT1119) ALBUM INFO AND MP3


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The three members of YOUNG WIDOWS emerged from the dissolution of BREATHER RESIST with a new vision steeped in dark, brooding grooves and moody post-punk. From the reverb-drenched inspiration of Regulator Watts/Hoover to the bass and drums lock-groove perfected by Shellac and the Jesus Lizard, YOUNG WIDOWS gladly wears influences on its sleeve. The signature inventive guitar work of vocalist/guitarist Evan Patterson (Black Cross, The National Acrobat) is at its peak here, while the rhythm section of Nick Thieneman (also of Black Cross) and Geoff Paton lays down syrup-thick grooves, recalling Pacific Northwest heavyweights (think Melvins, Karp, even Nirvana), and British post-punk, ala Gang Of Four. Settle Down City (JT1119), their Jade Tree debut, contains 11 songs of hypnotic, heavy, noise-rock anthems and will be released September 12, 2006.

YOUNG WIDOWS will be making their live debut this Saturday, May 27th, at the Keswick Democratic Club in their hometown of Louisville, KY as part of the show series. Label mates PAINT IT BLACK will also be appearing, alongside noise-punks Pissed Jeans and locals Squarewell. The band will be hitting the road in July and August with Louisville brethren Coliseum and the two bands will be releasing a split 7” on their own Auxiliary Records label to coincide with the tour.

The first 100 customers will receive a free YOUNG WIDOWS poster hand screened by the band. Pre-orders will be shipped on August 25.

Vinyl will be available from

Track Listing:
1. Settle Down City
2. Almost Dead Beat
3. Glad He Ate Her
4. Small Talk
5. Formererer
6. Bruised Knees
7. Mirrorfucker
8.
9. New Forest
10. The First Half
11. We Don’t Know