Falsetto Keeps Time

Who could have known that this record would, in retrospect, become merely the first step for the long and celebrated career of one of indie rock’s most beloved bands? Well, okay. We had a hunch. You don’t have to be psychic to figure out that “A Picture Postcard,” for example, was only a glimpse of great things to come – so much so, in fact, that the band have yet to play a single show without its inclusion even six years later. Talk about timeless, eh?

1. A Picture Postcard
2. Saturday
3. Scenes From Parisian Life

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Beschta: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Recorded November 1995
Released February 1996

Recorded at Idful Music, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Casey Rice
Produced by Casey & The Ring
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Graphics by John Yates
Live Photo by Shawn Scallen

Boys + Girls

Three new tracks, including the ever popular, “Tell Everyone We’re Dead.” A delicate departure from previous efforts, this EP bridges the post-punk THE PROMISE RING with the unexceptionable power pop incarnation they had yet to unveil – a tasty mélange that is extraordinary in its own right.

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Schoenbeck: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Recorded September 1998
Released October 1998

Recorded at Smart Studios, WI
Engineered by Mike Zirkel
Produced by J. Robbins
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Jason Gnewikow
Cover Photography by Jason
Band Photo by Chrissy Piper

1. Tell Everyone We’re Dead
2. Best Looking Boys
3. American Girl (Version 02)

Very Emergency

Time breeds sophistication, and as the THE PROMISE RING usher in over half a decade as a band – no small feat in an industry of quick burnouts, mind you – they also bring a new noise. Using a wide palette of inspiration that renders depth and revelation to the band’s already distinguished character, Very Emergency (JT1043) finally delivers on what previous recordings have only hinted at – namely, a deepening appreciation for songcraft and the realization that a great pop record can be both simple and smart.

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Schoenbeck: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Released June 1999
Recorded September 1999

Recorded at Inner Ear Studios, VA
Engineered & Produced by J. Robbins
Mixed at Smart Studios, WI
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Jason Gnewikow
Photography by Andy Mueller

1. Happiness is all the Rage
2. Emergency! Emergency!
3. The Deep South
4. Happy Hour
5. Things Just Getting Good
6. Living Around
7. Jersey Shore
8. Skips a Beat (Over You)
9. Arms & Danger
10. All of My Everythings

Electric Pink

Four new songs by Milwaukee’s patron saints of prolificness. “Strictly Television,” though originally recorded for the Very Emergency (JT1043) sessions, harks back to THE PROMISE RING sound of yore, while the remaining three tracks continue in their current power pop tradition. Further proof that this veritable indie rock institution are in it for the long haul—and further.

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Schoenbeck: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Recorded February 2000
Released May 2000

Tracks 1 & 4 Recorded & Mixed by Mike Zirkel at Gravity, Chicago
Tracks 2 & 3 Recorded by J. Robbins at Inner Ear, DC
and Mixed at Smart Studios, Madison
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Jason Gnewikow

1. Electric Pink
2. Strictly Television
3. American Girl (v.01)
4. Make Me a Mixtape

The Horse Latitudes

Is a less-than two year existence entirely too early to release an anthology CD? Not when you’re THE PROMISE RING and you’ve already chalked up two singles, a split 7″, and a couple of new songs that you’re just dying to release because it’s been, oh, only a few months since your debut full-length LP hit the shops. Apparently, these guys have no idea what it means to go resting on your laurels.

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Beschta: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Released February 1997

Tracks 1-2 Originally released as the “Watertown Plank b/w Mineral Point” 7″
Released May 1995 (Foresight).Recorded April 1995
Tracks 3-5 Originally released as the “Falsetto Keeps Time” 7″ February 1996
(JT1023).Recorded November 1995
Track 6 Originally released as the “The Promise Ring/Texas is the Reason”
Split 7″ May 1996 (JT1024). Recorded March 1996
Tracks 7-8 Recorded December 1996 (Exclusive Never Released Bonus Tracks)

Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Layout by Jason Gnewikow
Photography by Scott Beschta

1. Watertown Plank
2. Mineral Point
3. A Picture Postcard
4. Saturday
5. Scenes From Parisian Life
6. E. Texas Ave.
7. Miette
8. I Never Trusted the Russians

Nothing Feels Good

If there was ever a straw that broke a camel’s back, this was it. The kids had their say and, for once, they agreed on something. Everyone from SPIN Magazine to MTV’s Matt Pinfield was marveling over this record. THE PROMISE RING themselves were catapulted from the tiny basement scene into the, erm, bigger basement and club scene. And we here at Jade Tree sold millions of records and never had to work again. Well, okay, that last part isn’t true, but if there were any justice in this world, it would be.

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Tim Burton: Bass (does not play on record)
Scott Beschta: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Recorded June 1997
Released October 1997

Recorded at Easley, Memphis, TN
Recorded & Mixed by J. Robbins & Stewart Sikes, Doug Easley, and Davis McCain
Produced by J. Robbins
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Jason Gnewikow
Graphic Assistance by Scott Kawczynski
Photography by Tim Owen

1. Is This Thing On?
2. Perfect Lines
3. Red & Blue Jeans
4. Why Did Ever We Meet
5. Make Me a Chevy
6. How Nothing Feels
7. A Broken Tenor
8. Rasberry Rush
9. Nothing Feels Good
10. Pink Chimneys
11. B is for Bethlehem
12. Forget Me

Falsetto Keeps Time

Who could have known that this record would, in retrospect, become merely the first step for the long and celebrated career of one of indie rock’s most beloved bands? Well, okay. We had a hunch. You don’t have to be psychic to figure out that "A Picture Postcard," for example, was only a glimpse of great things to come – so much so, in fact, that the band have yet to play a single show without its inclusion even six years later. Talk about timeless, eh?

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Beschta: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Recorded November 1995
Released February 1996

Recorded at Idful Music, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Casey Rice
Produced by Casey & The Ring
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Graphics by John Yates
Live Photo by Shawn Scallen

1. A Picture Postcard
2. Saturday
3. Scenes From Parisian Life

Split

Originally recorded to accompany a U.S. tour in 1996, Milwaukee’s PROMISE RING team up with the New York City-based TEXAS IS THE REASON for a split 7″ that still goes up for serious loot on internet auction sites everywhere despite the fact that it never went out of print and is available right here. Fairly outlandish, for sure, but we can understand why. THE PROMISE RING offer a slightly out-of-character track called “E. Texas Ave” that packs more punch than pop, while TEXAS IS THE REASON contribute a mournful number called “Blue Boy” – the final track they recorded before breaking up, still exclusive to this EP only.

The Promise Ring:

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Beschta: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Texas is the Reason:

Garrett Klahn: Vocals, Guitar
Norm Arenas: Guitar
Scott Winegard: Bass
Chris Daly: Drums

The Promise Ring Recorded March 1996
Texas is the Reason Recorded 1996
Released May 1996

The Promise Ring

1. E. Texas Ave.

Recorded at Salad Days, MA
Engineered & Mixed by Brian McTernan
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Graphics by John Yates
Live Photo by Justin Borucki

Texas is the Reason

2. Blue Boy

Recorded at Salad Days, MA
Engineered & Mixed by Brian McTernan
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Graphics by John Yates
Live Photo by Justin Borucki

THE PROMISE RING
1. E. Texas Ave.

TEXAS IS THE REASON
2. Blue Boy

30 Degrees Everywhere

When you’re hot, you’re hot, and THE PROMISE RING were on an unstoppable creative roll as they prepped to release their debut album for Jade Tree and third release in less than a year. Being productive, however, certainly failed to drain the band’s seemingly endless well of quality songwriting, as this album – which gave Cherry Coke and John Taylor entry into the post-punk lexicon and inadvertently lavished the art of the pop music handclap with a renewed lease on life – convincingly attests.

Davey vonBohlen: Vocals, Guitar
Jason Gnewikow: Guitar
Scott Beschta: Bass
Dan Didier: Drums

Additional Musicians:

Rachel Dietkus: Violin on 9, 12

Recorded June 1996
Released September 1996

Recorded at Idful Music, IL
Engineered by Casey Rice, Damon Locks, Joe Ferguson
Mixed by Casey Rice
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Graphics by Jason Gnewikow
Photography by Tim Owen & Scott Beschta
Lyrical Credit to B. Nanna & M. Kozelek on Track 8

1. Everywhere In Denver
2. Red Paint
3. Heart Of A Broken Story
4. Scenes From France
5. Anne You Will Sing
6. My Firetower Flame
7. Between Pacific Coasts
8. A Picture Postcard
9. Somebody’s Done For
10. The Sea of Cortez
11. Run Down The Waterfall
12. We Don’t Like Romance (Instr.)

An Oral History of The Promise Ring Published by The A.V. Club

In advance of The Promise Ring’s first reunion show, The Onion’s has posted “An Oral History of The Promise Ring” by featuring commentary by the band members, Jade Tree’s , Texas Is The Reason’s and among others.

Read: [The AV Club]

The interviews make for a nice read in anticipation of revisiting the live experience, which begins tonight at the Turner Hall Ballroom in Milwaukee.

The Promise Ring currently has five reunion shows scheduled in 2012. While most of these are sold out, there are sure to be a few more opportunities to see the band live, so be vigilant!

02/24 Milwaukee, WI @ Turner Hall Ballroom SOLD OUT
02/25 Chicago, IL @ Metro SOLD OUT
05/19 Asbury Park, NJ @ The Bamboozle Festival [URL]http://2012.thebamboozle.com/home|Tickets|EXTERNAL[/URL]
05/20 New York, NY @ Irving Plaza SOLD OUT
09/01 San Francisco, CA @ The Fillmore [URL]http://www.livenation.com/event/1C0048517A4B5E2A|Tickets|EXTERNAL[/URL]




The Promise Ring Reunite on Twitter, Facebook and In Real Life

Whether the energy of last year’s Cap’n Jazz reunion was contagious or it’s just a ten year itch, The Promise Ring have decided it’s time to get the band back together. Milwaukee and Chicago shows have been confirmed for February. The Chicago show sold out immediately, but something tells us that there is more news on the horizon. Fortunately, The Promise Ring has popped up on and to keep us up to date.

The Promise Ring Reunion Dates
2/24/2012 Turner Hall Ballroom, Milwaukee, WI
2/25/2012 Metro, Chicago, IL (Sold Out)

Rolling Stone:

Follow The Promise Ring online:

Follow Jade Tree online:

Gateways to Geekery : Emo // The Promise Ring

Pop culture can be as forbidding as it is inviting, particularly in areas that invite geeky obsession: The more devotion a genre or series or subculture inspires, the easier it is for the uninitiated to feel like they’re on the outside looking in. But geeks aren’t born; they’re made. And sometimes it only takes the right starting point to bring newbies into various intimidatingly vast obsessions. Gateways To Geekery is our regular attempt to help those who want to be enthralled, but aren’t sure where to start. Want advice? Suggest future Gateways To Geekery topics by emailing gateways@theonion.com.
Geek obsession: Emo
Why it’s daunting: Can you say “emo” without wincing? In 2010, the word has become associated with so many things that it’s become practically meaningless, and whatever connotations it does have are overwhelmingly negative. To defend it is to invite the most withering of scorn. And why not? If all you knew of the word was dudes in eyeliner with stupid haircuts, what would you think? It doesn’t help that the bands that self-identify as emo are generally terrible—and often too young to know any better themselves. Ask them about Rites Of Spring, and chances are they’ll tilt their heads like confused puppies.
More confusingly, virtually every good band associated with emo never identified with the label, not only because few artists like to identify with subgenres (especially ones with silly names—see also: chillwave), but also because emo’s sonic attributes have changed since the mid-’80s. What began closely aligned with melodic hardcore and punk morphed into more removed and moody sounds, then gradually grew poppier to the point that its only association with punk was power chords.
So, to recap: Emo as a descriptor has been misappropriated into meaninglessness; no good bands ever associate themselves with it; and the ones that do are generally awful. Why dig through all of that dirt to find the diamonds? Well, because they’re diamonds—even a genre as maligned as emo has produced its share.
Possible gateway: Sunny Day Real Estate, Diary

Why: What the first Ramones record was to a legion of kids who started punk bands, Diary was to a group of bands that would cohere into the second wave of emo. Although Sunny Day hailed from Seattle, it drew heavily from the post-punk sound that developed in Washington, D.C., in the late ’80s and early ’90s around Dischord Records. Bands like Jawbox, Shudder To Think, and most notably, Fugazi, had popularized a more cerebral strain of punk that experimented with dynamics—part of the loud/quiet revolution also incited by Pixies and Nirvana. What Fugazi harnessed better than any other was the power of restraint. Hardcore had been all about balls-out intensity, but Fugazi’s twisty rhythms and patient calculation made the louder, more intense parts of songs that much more powerful.
That dynamic plays out plainly—but magnificently—on Diary’s first two tracks, “Seven” and “In Circles.” “Seven” in particular shifts dramatically between loud and quiet. “Sew it on,” sings singer-guitarist Jeremy Enigk, just his vocals and a chord progression on his guitar. Then the rest of the band launches in for just a measure, each beat emphasized by drummer William Goldsmith and Enigk and guitarist Dan Hoerner’s dramatic melody. Enigk’s voice and guitar by themselves again: “Face the fool.” BA-DA-DA-DA-DA-DA-BUM, then into the verse, and the kind of oblique yet intensely personal lyrics that would inspire thousands of copycats:
December’s tragic drive
When time is poetry and
Stolen the world outside
The waiting could crush my heart
Then a bridge that alternates an exhaling guitar solo and the gut-punching breakdown from the intro, another verse, then the bridge, which gives way to a simple but brilliantly anthemic chorus:
You’ll taste it
You’ll taste it
In time
“In Circles” boasts a similarly majestic chorus, a more pronounced loud-quiet dynamic, and lyrics even more heart-bleedingly emo:
Meet me there, in the blue
Where words are not and feeling
Remains sincerity
Trust me to throw myself into your door
I go in circles running down
I dream to heal your wounds
But I bleed myself
When people like Chris Simpson of Mineral would later squeal “I wanted to taste that victory, but my mouth was dry, MY MOUTH WAS DRYY-YYYY,” or Jim Adkins from Jimmy Eat World sang “I really want to care when you say: ?°»I’ll change that.’ / I just don’t feel a thing when you say, ?°»We’ll get there…,’” it was easy to trace the lineage of such bald sentiment back to Sunny Day Real Estate. (The album was called Diary, for crissakes.)
Enigk’s lyrics are so unflinchingly sincere and guileless, it’s almost uncomfortable. They reflect the powerful longing that fuels Diary, but it never feels overly saccharine. SDRE owes much of that to the execution of the material—the music never wilts. Hoerner and Enigk’s guitar theatrics bear more than a passing resemblance to Treepeople, who were tearing up Seattle indie label C/Z Records around the time SDRE formed. Diary veers into dreamy atmospherics (like the piano and bass of “Pheurton Skeurto”), but it never wusses out. That sounds simplistic, but a little oomph goes a long way. When Enigk opens “Shadows” with his voice over a dreamy guitar singing “In the shadows buried in me lies a child’s toy,” it’s not long before the rest of the band kicks in, propelled by Goldsmith’s busy beats. (He is Sunny Day Real Estate’s secret weapon.)
Diary hovers in a difficult-to-find sweet spot, alternately contemplative and cathartic, an engrossing mix of melody, power, and atmosphere. For so many bands that came after Sunny Day Real Estate—who would essentially break up (for the first time) just months after the album’s release—Diary was the blueprint.

Next steps: If it’s historical perspective you seek, check out End On End by Rites Of Spring. (Really, you should get it regardless, if for no other reason than to hear the fantastic “For Want Of.”) While you’re ordering from the Dischord store, pick up the self-titled debut from Embrace. After the end of seminal hardcore outfit Minor Threat, frontman Ian MacKaye took an introspective turn in Embrace, a shocking move for a guy who’d formerly been known for his hoarse-throated polemics. Although even in 1986, the “emocore” label chafed:

Emo as a style really didn’t catch on until the early ’90s and the beginning of its second wave. Diary represents the apotheosis of that sound, though several bands were mining similar territory around that time. Colorado’s Christie Front Drive played a particularly contemplative music prone to long buildups with Eric Richter’s vocals buried in the mix. Its so-called “Anthology” record from 1995 is a classic, though emo completists may want to check out the band’s split album with the similarly minded Boys Life (a perfect moniker for the generally female-less emo scene—only "White Boys Life" would be more apt). It doesn’t really get more emo than calling your album The Power Of Failing, and Mineral couldn’t really be more emo. The band’s brooding style favored slow tempos and big releases, but Mineral was at its best when it rocked out.
A trio of other albums really helped define the second wave: Do You Know Who You Are? By Texas Is The Reason, Nothing Feels Good by The Promise Ring, and Frame And Canvas by Braid. The guys in Texas came from the New York hardcore scene, and the band’s guitar-heavy sound reflected that. The Promise Ring was the poppiest band of the second wave, a clear influence on The Get Up Kids, who would sell a ton of records a few years later. Braid had the most ambitious sound, heavily indebted to the twisty, jerky time signatures of the D.C. bands on Dischord Records. (Jawbox frontman J. Robbins produced the album.)
But the two biggest records that arrived after Diary came in 1999: Clarity by Jimmy Eat World and Something To Write Home About by The Get Up Kids. Where Sunny Day Real Estate held its punk roots close, both of these bands were more interested in pop hooks. Jimmy Eat World began its life as a pop-punk band years before, then added the formidable Static Prevails to the canon of second-wave emo, but by Clarity, the group’s transformation to an outright pop band was nearly complete. Still, Clarity retained a few of the sonic signifiers of the second wave, and the lyrics sent thousands of hearts a-flutter with lines like the aptly titled “Crush,” “Take in restraint like a breath / My lungs are so numb from holding back.” Where Jimmy Eat World favored rock songs (many with gigantic guitars, like “Your New Aesthetic,” “Crush,” “Blister,” “Clarity”) and only a couple of ballads, The Get Up Kids punctuated practically every other track of Something To Write Home About with a ballad (“Valentine,” which is about exactly what you’d think, “Out Of Reach,” “Long Goodnight,” “I’ll Catch You”). And thus emo’s third wave was born, producing a lot of bands you should avoid.
A few from that era stick out as worthy: Motion City Soundtrack owes more than a little to The Get Up Kids in its keyboard-heavy pop songs. The hallmark of emo’s third wave was the emphasis of pop over punk, though Motion City balances the two better than most. 2005’s Commit This To Memory is probably the best place to start, though last year’s excellent My Dinosaur Life works as well. Although it hasn’t aged particularly well, and the band’s subsequent albums have faltered considerably, Taking Back Sunday’s 2002 debut, Tell All Your Friends, qualifies as one of the better entries into the generally dreadful “screamo” subgenre. (If nothing else, “Cute Without The E (Cut From The Team)” is really catchy.)
Speaking of catchy, Fall Out Boy’s sensitive-boy pop-punk earned the emo association early on, and 2003’s Take This To Your Grave finds the band at its most guileless. It’s almost maddeningly catchy and full of the kind of lovelorn lyrics that would typify the third wave, for better or worse. (When it comes to the bands that emulated Fall Out Boy, it’s definitely for the worse.)
Where not to start: Take your pick, as chances are you’ll find the bad stuff before the good. Although Chris Carrabba of Dashboard Confessional has experimented with a more rocking sound (relatively speaking) made with a full band, and he’s long been an easy target of anti-emo zealots, the acoustic mope-rock of his breakthrough, The Places You Have Come To Fear The Most, should be avoided. Emblematic of the full dissociation of emo from punk is a band like Boys Like Girls, who cite Dashboard as an influence but are as vapid as any hair-metal cock-rock band from the ’80s, which is precisely the kind of music they’d be playing if they were alive in those days.

The Promise Ring Featured on Soundtrack to Remember Me


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All of those THE PROMISE RING loving, Robert Pattison fans may have noticed the song "Why Did Ever We Meet" from the band’s classic album on the soundtrack to the recently released film . Viewers of the film will also hear the likes of The Sea & Cake, Sparklehorse and Sigur Ros among others.

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Jade Tree also offers several items of THE PROMISE RING Merchandise in our :

The Promise Ring Part of Insound 10 Classic Series by Designer Mike Perry


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The good folks at have just released an exclusive Promise Ring design as part of their Insound 10 Classic design project. Here is the word directly from Insound:

We’re so pleased to tell you that The Promise Ring is part of a brand new design project called the Insound 10 Classic, along with nine other great bands, including Sunny Day Real Estate, Sleater-Kinney, Beat Happening and others. The project was put together by Insound.com and artist/deigner/writer Mike Perry (). Mike did a new design for each band and the designs are being silk-screened onto posters, t-shirts and record totes. Everything is limited edition and the posters are signed and numbered. Insound is now taking pre-orders and products are supposed to arrive in mid-September. This is a very cool project and we do hope you like the designs. Please check it out at:

http://www.insound.com/classic10/thepromisering_large.jpg

If your CD shelves or hard drive is missing any of the The Promise Ring catalog, take some time to complete it with their three seminal albums – (JT1035), (JT1043) and (JT1026) – as well as their many on Jade Tree.

All Jade Tree releases can also be found on and , among a host of .

The Promise Ring on The Beast Tonight


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The song "Raspberry Rush" from THE PROMISE RING‘s classic album has found it’s way into an episode of A&E’s , which airs tonight. Check out the A&E site for more information about the show.

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Jade Tree also offers several items of THE PROMISE RING Merchandise in our :

It Was 40 10 Years Ago Today: 18 Reasons 1997 Might Be The Next 1967

16. The Promise Ring, Nothing Feels Good

The Promise Ring became an indie favorite with 1996′s 30 Degrees Everywhere, but Nothing Feels Good secured the band’s status as the most important entry in emo’s second wave. Songs like "Is This Thing On?", "Why Did We Ever Meet," and "Forget Me" showed the Ring’s punk roots, but wrapped them in big pop hooks with sweet sentiment. The Promise Ring didn’t create a new aesthetic on Nothing Feels Good—other bands were doing something similar—but the album was its apotheosis. Even though the group never lived up to the "next big thing" status Nothing Feels Good conferred, the record remains one of the era’s defining albums. As such, it fomented thousands of crappy-sounding copycats, a curse that lingers a decade later.

TPR AND JOA: ’97 MIGHT BE THE NEXT ’67

THE PROMISE RING‘s classic album Nothing Feels Good has been highlighted in a piece on . JOAN OF ARC‘s A Portable Model Of also received a mention in the article.

If you missed out on the THE PROMISE RING, take some time to get acquainted with their three seminal albums – (JT1035), (JT1043) and (JT1026) – as well as their countless on Jade Tree. Also take a look at JOAN OF ARC‘s for a bit of a refresher.

30 Degrees Everywhere A Portable Model Of, and all Jade Tree releases can also be found on and , among a host of .

When Emo was Good: The Promise Ring

It was you know. Good that is. Once emo wasn’t a dirty word, a disgusting, filthy, badly applied word used to describe bad pop-metal bands. Once it was a rather silly name for a very wide spanning and interesting scene that overlapped with the post-rock scene in America and throughout the world to embrace a number of bands who wanted to make a more cerebral and affecting version of punk rock than the more masculine exponents of the genre were so badly making.

Yes it was a bit silly, a bit self involved and sceneish, but some of the music produced was so stunningly wonderful that I couldn’t help but love it. Even today certain records by Braid, Cap’n Jazz, Promise Ring, Spy Versus Spy, Jawbox, Jawbreaker and Sunny Day Real Estate are some of my favourite albums of all time, and it’s a DAMN shame that the name has been stolen by such an irritating genre; and stolen is has, as there’s very little musical or even lyrical connection between the new emo and the old. The new is dumbed down, usually rather sexist and macho in its anti-female stance, and is musically pedestrian. The old was the exact opposite of those things.

Here are a few early songs from The Promise Ring, a band who oroduced four stunning hook+emotion filled albums from 1996 to 2002, the best of which are probably 1997′s Nothing Feels Good and Very Emergency. These songs come from the early singles compilation The Horse Latitudes. Enjoy.



AP WRITES PERFECT LINES ABOUT THE PROMISE RING

With their one-and-only reunion show at in Chicago less than a month away, Jade Tree godfathers THE PROMISE RING are featured in this month’s in a major way. The seven-page AP feature presents an oral history of all of the highs and lows of these Milwaukee power-pop kings, as told in their and their friends’ own words. For those of you who are just finding out about the band, consider this your Intro to Promise Ring 101 textbook, while those of you who are long time fans will find the answers to all of your burning TPR mysteries. Grab the mag now and make sure to make it The Metro in Chicago on November 12th to catch the reunion.

Please see The Promise Ring for all of the show details.

THE PROMISE RING REUNITE TO PLAY FLOWER15

Hot damn. The headline above is not a typo. First Lifetime, now THE PROMISE RING will be reuniting to headline a showcase at Flower Booking’s 15th anniversary celebration and fundraiser, , this November. The kings of Midwestern feel-good pop have not played a show since they disbanded in 2002 and their performance on November 12th will be their one and only reunion. Flower15 takes place November 8th through the 13th at Chicago’s world famous and other headliners include Jimmy Eat World, Ted Leo, Isis and Local H. In addition to the headliners, Maritime (which features members of The Promise Ring), American Analog Set, Just A Fire, Detachment Kit, Essex Green and Make Believe have all confirmed shows.

If you’re not already a true blue Promise Ring fan, there’s no better time than now to get hip to their three seminal albums – (JT1035), (JT1043) and (JT1026) – as well as their countless on Jade Tree.