S/T

Omaha, Nebraska’s all-star STATISTICS is the new band from Desaparecidos founder, main songwriter and guitarist Denver Dalley. Complementing, yet expanding upon Denver’s efforts with the Saddle Creek powerhouse he fronted with Conor Oberst (Bright Eyes), STATISTICS is percolating, hushed electro-pop melded with power-rock dynamics and pure, timeless hooks.

1. Another Day
2. (A Memory)
3. Hours Seemed Like Days
4. (A Flashback)
5. Cure Me

Written and performed by Denver Dalley
Produced by Mike Mogis at Presto except track 2 produced by Denver Dalley.
Drums on track 1,3, and 4 by Mike Sweeney.
Mastered by Doug Van Sloun at Studio B.
Layout by Mehron Moqtaderi and Denver Dalley.

Leave Your Name


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The debut full length from STATISTICS refuses to be pinned down to any one style, rather the record spans the sonic spectrum with an impressive collection of power pop song craft, steadfast hooks and textural soundscapes. The distinctive, eleven-song Leave Your Name (JT1091), is a bittersweet gem, a singular vision and lays claim to a sound that is very much it’s own.

LP Cover:

http://www.jadetree.com/images/store/covers/JT1091-2.jpg

Written and performed by Denver Dalley
Track 8 by Tim Kasher and Denver Dalley
Additional musicians:
A.J. Mogis – Additional keys throughout
Derry Delamar – Drums on 1,3,4 and 10
Elijah Dalley – Heartbeat on 7
Ian McElroy – Keys on 4
Jesse Shacklock – Drum loop on 11
Timothy Nobles – Bass on 1,3,4 and 10
Scott Martin – Piano and bass on 11
Mike Sweeney – Drums on 6
Recorded by A.J. Mogis at Presto!
Track 11 recorded by Scott Martin
Track 6 recorded by Mike Mogis
Mastered by Doug Van Sloun at Studio B

1. Sing A Song
2. Leave Your Name
3. The Grass Is Always Greener
4. Mr. Nathan
5. Accomplishment
6. Hours Seemed Like Days
7. Chairman Of The Bored
8. 2 A.M.
9. A Number, Not A Name
10. Reminisce
11. Circular Memories

Often Lie

Denver Dalley’s follow up to Leave Your Name finds the lanky Omaha native upping the ante and delivering a record that is as poignant as it is potent. Often Lie begins with a breathy whisper, but it hardly murmurs for long before guitars hurtle in and the first power chord rings out. An album of mournful pop perfection, Omaha native and Desaparecidos co-songwriter Dalley delivers the goods here; delicate odes to forgotten radio DJs and loves lost are peppered with electronic flourishes while crushing choruses beautifully butt up against a melancholic wash of breathtaking production, but when push comes to shove Often Lie elegantly ends in a resounding crash.

Written and performed by Denver Dalley

Recorded by AJ Mogis
Mastered by Doug Van Sloun

Drums on tracks 1, 2, 4, 5 and 8 by Matt Baum
Drums on tracks 3, 6, 7 and 9 by Corey Broman
Bass on tracks 1, 3, 6, 7 and 9 by Jon Tvrdik
Additional drums on track 1 by Mike Sweeney
Additional bass and keyboards by AJ Mogis

1. Final Broadcast
2. Nobody Knows Your Name
3. Say You Will
4. No Promises
5. A Foreword
6. By(e) Now
7. Begging To Be Heard
8. At The End
9. 10.22

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Jade Tree records is the voice of great indie rock music in a time when most labels are scuttling about trying to sell as many crappy records to stupid kids as possible. They sign honest, hard-working, original bands, and this band is certainly no exception. There is something especially soothing about these guys, who I would simply label as soft indie rock/post punk. I thoroughly enjoyed this album and I will definetly be listening to it again. The vocals are not in the least bit whiny or annoying, always a deciding factor for me. Some people can enjoy music and ignore the vocals but not me. This guy sings as well as writes the music, another impressive thing.
Anyways, this is a very solid and easy going release. It would probably relax you if you’re stuck in traffic or be great to make out to. If any of this sounds good to you then go get this ASAP.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

I’ve heard that 80% of statistics are made up on the spot. And I’m pretty sure that when I heard that, it was being made up right then. It was, after all, on a morning radio show, a forum not known for its dedication to research or its reliance on hard facts. I’ve also heard that 40% of what you hear on the radio are complete fabrications. For example, Justin Timberlake did not really want you to cry him a river, and Mariah Carey is not being entirely honest when she tells you that “we belong together.” However, sources indicate that Lil John sincerely wants to get crunked, and I am inclined to believe him.

So a lot of statistics are made up, and such is the case with this band of the same name. Statistics is one man, Denver Dalley, a few friends, and a musical vision. Once hidden in the shadows of Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst as fellow members of Desaparecidos, Dalley has stepped forward and into his own as a one-man band.

Like Pedro the Lion’s David Bazaan or the aforementioned Oberst, Dalley is the orchestrator and sole fixture in his “band,” doing as much as he can on his own (guitar, vocals, synth, etc.) and enlisting the help of friends and associates to do the rest. The final product is perfect indie pop. This is the kind of music that makes you glad that music exists. It won’t make you angry, it won’t make you sad, it will just make you happy to be where you are enjoying the sound from your speakers.

Dynamics and layers are what truly make this album great. Dalley is not afraid to forego the typical drums/bass/guitar formula typical of the indie pop genre in favor of more synthetic sounds. Fortunately for the listener, the choices feel entirely appropriate and never calculated. Guitars are wrapped in blankets of electronic textures, warming their bones by a fire fueled by dreamy pop and solid indie rock. Simply put: every song is a pleasure to experience.

The lyrics are excellently written, and particularly modern. Several times I found myself asking questions like, “Did he just sing something about cell phones?” And yes, he did. Lyrically, this record is a reflection of our time and the overlap between band life and real life. And all of this without distancing the listener (because these days everyone knows someone in a band).

If you’re looking for comparisons, I would suggest a mixture of Pedro the Lion and Jimmy Eat World’s Clarity album. But this record does not borrow or emulate; it merely reminds.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Often Lie is the second full-length from Omaha’s one-man wonderband, Statistics. For the unfamiliar, Statistics is the brainchild of former Desaparecidos member, Denver Dalley. Though he enlisted the help of extra musicians on the album, Dalley pulls the whole thing off onstage by himself with the help of a laptop. Clocking in at barely over half an hour, Often Lie is a nice collection of incredibly poppy, loud guitar-driven songs. Nothing too hard to swallow here. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing in this case, as Dalley’s lyrics are clever enough – within each song and contextually as an album – to keep fans of this style hooked.

Wonderfully recorded by A.J. Mogis, the album starts off with "Final Broadcast," which tells of a college radio programmer’s last night on the air. Within the first 10 seconds, the song bursts with huge guitars leading into a chorus that would sound completely at home on a major radio station. Make no mistake: this is poppy stuff. It’s very accessible and melodic in a style that many have abandoned as of late.

But Often Lie isn’t just another meat-and-potatoes pop record. The electronic elements prevalent on Statistics’ debut Leave Your Name are still present but to a lesser extent. The album’s centerpiece, "By(e) Now" (also the strongest track), alternates between an organic-sounding band and a electronic-EQ-manipulated wash. "Nobody Knows Your Name" climaxes with a harsh hiss that crescendos right into the track’s abrupt end. The tricks are subtle but effective enough to keep the songs from being too formulaic.

This is a nice album and a refreshing reminder that simple doesn’t have to be boring.
www.statisticsmusic.com

STATISTICS ARE SPIN’S BAND OF THE DAY!


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STATISTICS, whom a mere two days ago released Often Lie (JT1105) as the sparkling follow up to last year’s Leave Your Name (JT1091), are being featured as . The feature allows readers to vote and the band whom gets the most kudos will become Band of the Month, and ultimately a spin.com Band of the Year. The Band of the Month gets an ad in the magazine with a glossy color photo. Sounds killer, right? So show some love and go vote…

1.
2. Nobody Knows Your Name
3. Say You Will
4. No Promises
5. A Foreward
6. By(e) Now
7. Begging to Be Heard
8. At the End
9. 10.22

Please consult the Statistics for the dates.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

The Germans invented the word "wunderkind" for a reason. Case in point, Omaha whiz kid Denver Dalley, whose one-man-rock-machine Statistics garners such Teutonic praise with ease. The towering Dalley (6’3"!) used to play guitar and co-write for Conor Oberst’s "other" band, Desaparacidos, though evidently Oberst’s penchant for out-and-out sludge and look-at-me emotional histrionics didn’t quite fit his more understated bandmate. Under the Statistics moniker, Dalley plays Lou Barlow to Oberst’s J Mascis, as he strikes out on his own with a simpler, more direct take on his old band’s signature sound.

Statistics’ new album, Often Lie, features an army of Dalleys: The talented multi-instrumentalist handles everything from guitar and vocals to vintage synths, drums, and beat programming (thus the "wunderkind" label). Despite the album’s insular process, the "band" sounds huge. Opener "Final Broadcast" begins with muted guitar jangle, instantly demolished by a fuzzed-out power chord, fading into a teen-angst-anthem chorus with a heartwrenching melody. Dalley knows his pop songcraft, and Statistics’ songs are uniformly lean and catchy.

Dalley whispers the kind of starkly confessional, emotionally naked lyrics that seem to come easier to the alienated Midwestern psyche. On the standout "A Foreword," an achingly sweet tune wafts over a pummeling rhythm section and buzzing synths. In the midst of the maelstrom, Dalley offers a paean skyward: "A way to begin, let’s start over / I’m dying to be living and / Things seem better from the start / I don’t care if I finish this time." Statistics romanticizes teen angst like a heart-covered journal, finding a warm corner in between disparate strains of emo-punk and nestling in for a lonely night.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Honestly it is a pure joy to listen to Statistics´ latest record. “Often Lie” is their second full length on Jade Tree records. The label is pretty known for bands like Pedro The Lion, The Loved Ones or Paint It Black I am totally amazed by the bands latest release, which I would describe as solid Indie or Emo-Rock release. The songs convince the listener with nice and emotional rock songs, which make it simple to dream to. The record shows a strong similarity to bands like Jimmy Eat World or Solea. In general I would say, that “Often Lie” is a pretty mature and romantic record with warm and cosy vocals combined with drum computers and synthesisers. Yeah, I feel like back in 1998, when the word Emo was born. Statistics definitely belong into this genre. Their latest record contains 8 songs plus one instrumental song, which deal with pretty normal themes like Love. The soft and careful drum- and guitar work, as well as the silent parts which are only underlined by electric guitars or synthesizer, make this record so special and pleasant.

STATISTICS "OFTEN LIE" (JT1105) OUT TODAY


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It’s here and it’s ready! Are you? Omaha’s Denver Dalley fires a barrage of crafty songs with STATISTICS newest release, Often Lie. Apparently there is an endless supply of compelling songs in Denver’s front pockets, and his new record, backed by echoing power chords and a voice that is as soothing as it is compelling, proves this yet again. Often Lie is rife with the musical clatter of hurtling guitars, intermittent electronic splashes, and lyrical disarmament that pops and settles while the CD plays on.

Desaparecidos co-songwriter Dalley delivers the goods here, delicate odes to forgotten radio DJs and loves lost are peppered with electronic flourishes while crushing choruses beautifully butt up against a melancholic wash of breathtaking production. Often Lie is in many ways the record Dalley has been hinting at since STATISTICS inception: moving, buoyant, and as revealing a snapshot as any record that has trickled out of the Midwest.

If you need further proof feel free to check out STATISTICS where you can stream the entire record front to back, you lucky dog you.

1.
2. Nobody Knows Your Name
3. Say You Will
4. No Promises
5. A Foreward
6. By(e) Now
7. Begging to Be Heard
8. At the End
9. 10.22

Please consult the Statistics for the dates.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Okay, I’m sure Statistics’ Denver Dalley, bandmate of Conor Oberst in the underrated Desaparecidos (Saddle Creek), is sick and tired of having his solo project compared to Bright Eyes. So let’s not even make the comparison. Instead, let’s focus on what Dalley is doing right on Often Lie. From the opening strains of "Final Broadcast," his cheesy but touching ode to college radio, it’s clear Statistics are here to revive those fuzzy feelings of mid-to-late-’90s emo rock. Yep, we’re talking Jimmy Eat World, Mineral, Sunny Day Real Estate … Is this perking you up at all? If so, Often Lie is gonna get some serious spins. But, no worries for those looking for something a little more current – it’s not all decade-old emo rock on this multifaceted album. More like an ode to those days with a current twist; tracks like the lovely "Say You Will" and the downright contemplative "By(e) Now" could easily stand up against any band the cool neighbor down the apartment building hall is cranking first thing in the morning. And, yes, that includes you-know-who. Oops, sorry, there I go …

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Denver Dalley has a great great great talent for putting together perfectly soaring, monumental guitar riffs – if you listen to them, they’re extremely simple. No fancy pickwork or anything, but just the melody is perfectly put together, the ambience riding over it all is so deeply emotional. Just when the opening track, "Final Broadcast," kicks in near the end, you’ll know what I mean. Just three chords, one above the other, but there’s just a way that those chords are played that comes together perfect. He gently describes simple things – holding one’s own hands, taking a drink – but gives them a striking visual, as though the mere blink of an eye can be the most telling thing in a world a person could do. His signature guitar sound is weaved through a lot of the songs. It’s very prevalent, and that might bug me for its ever-presence (like there’s nothing else he could think to do with that guitar) if not for the fact that all the other perihperal things in the songs make each so unique. That guitar sound is the unifying element, and everything else jumps off from there in a wide arc. "No Promises…" – I could cry, I love this song so much. When I listened through the disc for the first time, I was walking along a lagoon in a sunset so bright, it’s reflection off the rippling water was blinding. That was my first glimpse of this song, and it seemed suiting to the gulls wheeling around me. I had to repeat the song. By then I was walking through a cool tangle of woods and blossoming blackberry bushes. I had to repeat the song. By then I was on the oceanfront, where the violent tide was coming in, angrily smashing foamy waves against the retaining wall I was walking along, sending a sparkling spray of water five feet above my head in the sun. It was perfect. What a beautiful, haunting, lonely-sounding song. Keeping in with what we’d discussed some time ago, there are less instrumental songs on this album. In fact, only one – the ender, "10/22" which culminates the album much like a freakout show-ending jam session might. Just heaps of reverby guitars battling with grittier guitars, intermittent drums, and then that’s just it…

Another amazing showing by the soft-voiced, swirling guitared Denver Dalley.

Song of choice : "No Promises." Honestly. Gut-wrenching. I feel so sad…

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Just who is Denver Dalley? The question’s troubled listeners for a while now. Although he has a fair amount of work on his resume – an album and an EP fronting Statistics and an album playing guitar in Desparecidos, the Nebraskan’s oft-wandering musical tastes always made him a tough nut to crack. Was he a melody-loving indie kid? An experimental weirdo? A guitar-worshipping rocker? You could argue all three using bits and pieces of his Statistics work.

On Often Lie, Dalley’s second full-length as Statistics, everything slowly comes into focus, and the answer is he’s all of the above – but not in the segmented bits and pieces as before. This time, Statistics unifies Dalley’s musical vision to deliver the most song-based work in the band’s catalog, using hard-rockin’ guitars as the foundation for all his musical misdirections.

At long last, Statistics has an album that’s cohesive from end to end. While this might ruin some of the playful charms that made the eclectic (or schizophrenic, depending on your tastes) track listing on Leave Your Name (2004, Jade Tree), it establishes Dalley as a fully functioning songwriter with a vision rather than a helter-skelter I’ll-record-anything ethos. It also makes for the best songs in Dalley’s small catalog.

Dalley condenses his myriad aims into a package, showing that it’s OK to be an indie rocker who loves loud guitar. “Final Broadcast” opens the album with light, jangle-pop guitars interrupted by a crunched-up electric that burst into full power-pop punch for the chorus. “No Promises” puts rolling, full-rock-style drums under ballady guitars for a sound stuck somewhere between The Foo Fighters and Death Cab For Cutie. “Nobody Knows Your Name” and “Bye(e) Now” dabble with electronic-damaged drum sounds and guitar synths for a sound that alludes to emo-pop’s glory days without needing to drag its carcass out of the ground. With a new ear for layering his arrangements, Dalley (who writes and performs the entire album by himself) discovers a way to make all aspects of his musical personality shine on Often Lie.

Dalley doesn’t redefine our notions of indie rock, power pop or even the legacy of jangly emo (which informs Often Lie more than he’d probably like to admit), but he does strike an uneasy truce between the three to finally answer the “Just who the heck is Denver Dalley?” question.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

"Lately, songs don’t sound the same as they did."* Sad, but true.

Often Lie is a different release from the Statistics’ debut Leave Your Name: less vintage keyboards and less instrumentals, and more buzzing guitars. Yes!

Denver Dalley (guitarist for Desaparecidos) is the Statistics. A one-man gang that can construct a towering rock sound as easily as a five piece, Dalley creates moody indie-rock that lingers like a thick fog, blurring your vision yet rousing the senses.

Fuzzed-out guitars and spine-chilling reverberating guitar picks slowly drift about without hurry. Cold electronics quietly smolder beneath layers of guitars, bass, and drums while Dalley’s warm vocals are gentle and soft-spoken, as if he’s personally whispering words into your ears. Parts of Often Lie are quiet and laidback, others are poppy and full of powerful rock. At the right moments Dalley knows when to pull on the reigns, and also when to whip for a burst of acceleration and increase in volume. This give-and-take approach perfectly balances Often Lie.

From the rock guitar thrust of "Final Broadcast" to the cool and calm Pedro the Lion-esque "Begging To Be Heard," to even the sonically expansive instrumental closer "i0.22," Often Lie contains great diversity, cold and humid, gentle and energetic. My favorite track off the release, "By(e) Now," perfectly encompasses both the chilly electronics and the organic warmth of a six-stringed guitar.

I enjoyed the company of Leave Your Name, but Often Lie has my heart.

A Statistics that doesn’t Lie

There’s something that strikes me about Statistics.

No, not the math, the band. I hate math, but this band kicks ass.

That the band’s newest endeavor is titled Often Lie is a mere bonus. Statistics is Denver Dalley, a Tennessee/Omaha veteran of the band Desaparecidos, and his work is simply striking.

He has shown great leaps and bounds since his last release, Leave Your Name, where his vocals were meek and nervous, and the album was full of intricate instrumentals. Often Lie departs from his previous efforts, which featured more instrumentals, but that style isn’t absent. Instead, he builds on his ability to write instrumental songs and completes them with brooding lyrics.

He borrows from other artists (namely Rilo Kiley – Dalley’s "Say You Will" resembles Kiley’s "Portions for Foxes" faintly), and he puts his own touch on the tracks.

Dalley’s strength will always lie in his live performances, and I’d be willing to bet that the performances of the songs on Often Lie will solidify them as quality pieces. When Desaparecidos (in which Dalley played guitar) was around, he was bouncing around the stage, seriously rocking out, and even though Statistics’ material is less intense, his stage presence remains strong. His new-found confidence will only make his live performances better.

Often Lie is quick and full of complex lead and backup guitars that work well. Standout tracks include "Final Broadcast" and "At the End," although Dalley’s lyrics fall a bit short through most of the album. His words are simple, and the messages are clear, which can either be a strength or a weakness, depending on your expectations.

The only instrumental that shows up on the album, "10/22," closes out a true-to-style Statistics record with more than five minutes of swells, ebbs, and crescendos.

Often Lie is a quality album, far better than previous solo work by Dalley, and it demonstrates that his style and confidence as a frontman are slowly growing and blossoming. With a few more records, he will find his niche, and then Statistics will shine on- and offstage.

STATISTICS TOWER PRE-ORDER AND TOUR

Suiting up in Lawrence, Kansas, STATISTICS has just waded out on tour with Azure Ray’s Maria Taylor, this July you’ll find Denver Dalley ricocheting all over the U.S. (with one date in Toronto), scattering his surging, twisting guitar rhythms and shoulder-nudging vocals in the process.

He’ll be playing some tunes from his new record, Often Lie, out July 12, which, if preordered via the good folks at along with any other CD from the Jade Tree catalog, comes with a Location is Everything Vol. 2 compilation CD absolutely free!

Denver and Maria’s tour comes to a smooth halt in their hometown of Omaha, Nebraska, at the end of July.

Please consult the Statistics for the dates.

Statistics [I]Often Lie[/I] Review

Nebraska is home to so much more than hate crimes and endless fields of crops. It has culture. It has music. It has tall, corn-fed indie-rockers — Denver Dalley, for example. Formerly of Desaparecidos (with Conor Oberst, also of Bright Eyes), Dalley has been occupied with his one-man plan, Statistics, since 2003. When he broke away from Desa’s harsher sound, he created something new, something easier to digest. Onstage, he rotates from guitars to synthesizers, from open vocals to distortions, sometimes singing through a teeny-tiny bullhorn. The sound is relaxing and easy, and his songs move fluidly from mellow to energetic. On the cusp of a new release, Often Lie (July 12), Dalley’s 27-city tour kicks off in Lawrence Friday.

STATISTICS LAUNCH TOUR & BATMAN BEGINS

Today is perhaps one of the best days so far this summer as it marks the release of the most compelling superhero movie to date. Batman Begins has certain members of the Jade Tree office seriously considering wearing tights and a cape to the next company picnic. With that image fresh in your mind we can give you another reason to be pumped…put on your utility belt and beginning next week go check out the forthcoming STATISTICS tour.

Denver Dalley and crew will be at it again, this time touring with Saddlecreek uber-darling Maria Taylor, road testing all the new tracks from the soon to be released Often Lie. Lest not forget that during the weeks that lead up to the July 12th release, we will be streaming versions of new songs, giving a sneak peak of STATISTICS second proper full length posting a new song each week via .

Please consult the Statistics for the dates.

STATISTICS OFTEN LIE ON PURE VOLUME

During the weeks that lead up to the release of Denver Dalley’s newest ball of pop bliss, we the good people of Jade Tree will be dropping streaming versions of new songs, giving a sneak peak of STATISTICS second proper full length, Often Lie. Starting today with three new tracks and running until the record’s release on July 12th, we will be posting a new song each week via .

So soak it up, get psyched, and be sure to check out STATISTICS on the road with Saddle Creek darling Maria Taylor all this July.

Please consult the Statistics for the dates.

STATISTICS "OFTEN LIE" CD (JT1105) AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER


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Listen up folks. After a sad absence from the world of virtual commerce we are pleased to announce the triumphant return of our . Back up and in full glory we are celebrating with the of Denver Dalley’s latest slab of sublime song craft; Statistics “Often Lie” (JT1105) begins with a breathy whisper, but it hardly murmurs for long before guitars hurtle in and the first power chord rings out. Omaha native and Desaparecidos co-songwriter Denver Dalley delivers the goods here, delicate odes to forgotten radio DJs and loves lost are peppered with electronic flourishes while crushing choruses beautifully butt up against a melancholic wash of breathtaking production. Often Lie is in many ways the record Dalley has been hinting at since Statistics inception: moving, buoyant, and as revealing a snapshot as any record that has trickled out of the Midwest.

And if that’s not enough to entice you, every pre-order customer is entered to win an iPod shuffle freshly loaded with Denver’s top ten Jade Tree albums!

1.
2. Nobody Knows Your Name
3. Say You Will
4. No Promises
5. A Foreward
6. By(e) Now
7. Begging to Be Heard
8. At the End
9. 10.22

STATISTICS "OFTEN LIE" CD (JT1105) ALBUM INFO AND MP3


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Out July 12th, STATISTICS’ second proper full length begins with a breathy whisper, but it hardly murmurs for long before guitars hurtle in and the first power chord rings out. Often Lie is an album of fist shaking angularity and mournful pop perfection. Omaha native and Desaparecidos co-songwriter Denver Dalley delivers the goods here; delicate odes to forgotten radio DJs and loves lost are peppered with electronic flourishes while crushing choruses beautifully butt up against a melancholic wash of breathtaking production, but when push comes to shove Often Lie elegantly ends in a resounding crash.

1.
2. Nobody Knows Your Name
3. Say You Will
4. No Promises
5. A Foreward
6. By(e) Now
7. Begging to Be Heard
8. At the End
9. 10.22

New Statistics Album Due in July

In his ongoing efforts to distance himself from the great double-LP shadow of his former bandmate Conor Oberst and the Saddle Creek scene in general, Denver Dalley (of Desaparecidos) will release his second album under the Statistics moniker on July 12 via Jade Tree. Entitled Often Lie (a obvious yet somewhat endearing play on the band’s name), the record will contain nine tracks, and may even deviate from the sound of the last year’s debut Leave Your Name, which, if you believe our estimable reviewer Alan Smithee, is a good thing. According to his press release, Dalley says, "I think the main reason that this album sounds so different from the last one is a lot of those [older] songs, I wrote when I was at home or sitting with a keyboard, whereas this Often Lie is more written on the road last year." Less electronic noodling, more road-tested chops? These nine songs will decide if that’s all talk:

01 Final Broadcast
02 Nobody Knows Your Name
03 Say You Will
04 No Promises
05 A Foreward
06 By(e) Now
07 Begging to Be Heard
08 At the End
09 10.22

STATISTICS GO EUROPEAN

Denver Dalley of Omaha based STATISTICS has been touring like mad since the January release of his hook-filled Leave Your Name LP/CD (JT1091). Now the plan is to head overseas for a months long jaunt blasting multiple dates in most of Germany, a good part of Spain, and of course Sweden for their fine taste in both food and furniture.

In other STATISTICS news; the band found themselves accosted by ESPN superstar Brendan Leonard during their recent stop in Chicago and the resulting footage wound up on the tail end of the newest episode of


Please consult the Statistics for current dates.

OMAHA’S STATISTICS BRING THE HOT

STATISTICS, hook-ladened Leave Your Name CD (JT1091) has, since its January release, been making waves with both critics and fans alike. The brainchild of Nebraskan Denver Dalley, STATISTICS have been wowing people with their unabashed love of both lilting sonic soundscapes and buoyant rawk songcraft. Now fresh off of a month long jaunt with The Velvet Teen — where the bands had the honor of playing the last official show at Chicago’s Fireside Bowling Alley [RIP] — the boys are getting ready to saddle up again, this time with Seattle based punsters Minus The Bear.


Please consult the Statistics for current dates.

STATISTICS HEAD OUT ON TOUR

Denver Dalley’s STATISTICS are gearing up for another bout across the states in support of Leave Your Name LP/CD (JT1091). The band will hook up with for most of August, beginning in Philadelphia and working their way across the East and through the Mid-West, before landing in Salt Lake City.

More dates are in the works, but in the meantime be sure to get out and support as these shows promise to be amazing.