Method & Sentiment

It’s not every day that you come across music as innovating as it is pleasurable, but Chicago’s JOAN OF ARC – as art-damaged as they are endearing – manage to accomplish just that with this three-song EP. Acoustic guitars, diffusive recording techniques, and computer tricknology lie underneath former Cap’n Jazz ringleader Tim Kinsella’s clever wordplay and wholly distinctive vocals to comprise one of the most engaging debut recordings we’ve ever had the pleasure to work with.

1. Didactic Prom
2. Please Sleep
3. Trial at Orleans

Tim Kinsella: Vocals, Guitar
Mike Kinsella: Guitar
Jeremy Boyle: Guitar, Electronics
Erik Bocek: Bass
Samuel Zurick: Drums

Additional Musicians:

Nathaniel Braddock: Trumpet

Recorded September 1996
Released October 1996

Recorded at Soma, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Elliot Dicks
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Lettering by Marlene Boyle
Sphere & Stool Constructed by Jeremy Boyle
Graphics by Jason Gnewikow
Photography by Ann-Marie Rounkle

How Memory Works

Hardly a singles album, the second full-length for this Chicago avant-rock troupe is a diverse collection of material that brings the band dabbling in electro-ambient and finding new inspiration in the studio-as-instrument concept.  At the same time, we’d deceptive if we neglected to mention that certain tracks – like the startling “This Life Cumulative” and “God Bless America” – just plain rock the old fashioned way. But we wouldn’t want to spoil your preconceptions.

1. Honestly Now
2. Gin & Platoni
3. To’ve Had Two Of
4. This Life Cumulative
5. A Pale Orange
6. White Out
7. So Open; Hooray
8. A Name
9. Osmosis Doesn’t Work
10. God Bless America
11. A Party Able Model Of

Tim Kinsella
Sam Zurick
Jeremy Boyle
Eirc Bocek
Mike Kinsella

Additional Muscians:

Marty Ackley: Musical Saw on 9
Zach Fiocca: Vibraphone on 3
Julie Pomerleau: Violin, Viola on 3, 11
Griffin Rodriquez: Cello on 3

Recorded October 1997 – February 1998
Released May 1998

Tracks 2, 4, 6, 8, & 10 recorded at Electrical Audio, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Casey Rice
Assistance by Rob Bochnik & Greg Norman
Tracks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, & 11 recorded at Truckstop, and Elliot Dicks’ old loft
Engineered & Mixed by Elliot
Sequenced by K.C. at Dan’s Hal Klazzikz
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Cover Painting by Jeremy Boyle
Layout by Jason Gnewikow

Live in Chicago

It’s not really a live album, but it’s certainly an experience. Four months of studio time culminate in thirteen interwoven tracks that ultimately find Tim Kinsella‘s inceptive lyrical style and primarily acoustic backdrop breathing comfortably alongside the band’s well-documented fetish for electronic embellishment. And the album artwork? Let’s just say that we’ll probably never meet another group of artists who are committed enough to rebuild the sets and reenact the scenes of an obscure foreign film for the sake of an album sleeve.

1. It’s Easier To Drink On An Empty Stomach Than To Eat On A Broken Heart
2. Who’s Afraid of Elizabeth Taylor?
3. If it Feels / Good, do it
4. Live in Chicago, 1999
5. (I’m 5 Senses) none of them Common
6. Me (Plural)
7. I’m certainly not pleased with my options for the future
8. When the Parish School dismisses and the Children running sing
9. Thanks for Chicago, Mr. James
10. (In Fact I’m) Pioneering New Emotions
11. Better De’d Than Read
12. Sympathy for the Rolling Stones
13. All until the Greens reveal themselves at dawn

Tim Kinsella
Jeremy Boyle
Todd Mattei

Additional Musicians:

Scott Adamson: Drums on 1, 4
Bob Akai: Drums on 2, 3, 8
Nathaniel Braddock: Trumpet on 3
Kevin J. Frank: Piano on 9, Organ on 10
Mike Kinsella: Drums on 5
Noel Kupersmith: Bass on 2, 8
Ryan Rapsys: Drums on 6, 10
Chris Warland: Saxophone on 3
Jen Wood: Vocals on 6

Recorded October 1998
Released May 1999
Recorded mostly at Classsicks, some at Truckstop West, a little at home, and
even some at Sherry and Lenora’s home
Recorded, Mixed, Produced, Programmed and Processed by Casey Rice
Additional Recording on Tracks 1, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, & 13 by Elliot Dicks
Additional Recording & Editing on Tracks 1, 6 by Scott Adamson
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Set Design and Construction by JOA
Photography by Andy Mueller
Renaissance Portrait Replication by Edgar Bryan
Art Direction by JOA, Andy Mueller, & Jason Gnewikow
Layout by Jason Gnewikow

The Gap

Juxtaposing more traditional acoustic arrangements against artificial future sounds, JOAN OF ARC has created The Gap (JT1053). Going way overboard and exhausting every option, with up to 100 tracks on certain songs, The Gap bears witness to a band evolving and crafting beautiful new territory. Use headphones and close your eyes.

1. (You) Can Not See (You) [Me] as (I) [You] (Can)
2. As Black Pants Make Cat Hairs Appear
3. Knife Fights Every Night
4. John Cassavetes, Assat Shakur, And Guy Debord walk into a bar…
5. Another Brick at the Gap (part 2)
6. Zelda
7. “Pleasure isn’t Simple”
8. Me and America (or) The United Colors of the Gap
9. Your Impersonation this Morning of Me Last Night
10. Outside the Gap

Tim Kinsellas
Todd Mattei
Matt Clark
Jeremy Boyle
Mike Kinsella

Additional Musicians:

Tania Bowers: Backing Vocals on 2, 8
Rebecca Gates: Backing Vocals on 2, 3
Ryan Hembrey: Upright Bass on 3, 8
Damon Locks: Backing Vocals on 2
Julie Pommerleau: Viola, Violin on 3, 8

Recorded October 1999 – June 2000
Released September 2000

Recorded at Classicks, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Casey Rice
Additional Recording at Soma & Engine by Sheik Labod
at Elliotsound and on location by Elliot Dicks, and
at Bedside Manor by Jeremy Lamos
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Paul Koob
Photography by Todd Mattei

How Can Any Thing So Little Be Any More?

While this EP uses the same template as JOA‘s The Gap, it has a thoughtful distance that gives it a more direct impact and appeal than it’s predecessor. Imbued with the same captivating and clever approach to song craft that has defined JOAN OF ARC‘S previous recordings, How Can Any Thing So Little Be Any More? (JT1057) also has a personality and refinement that embraces the lesser heard human side of the band while still remaining quietly just left of a definable boundary.

1. Leaving Needn’t Take Long
2. Ne Mosquitos Pass
3. We Neither Hide Nor Seek
4. Most at Home in Motels
5. My Cause is Noble and Just
6. My Fight is Necessary
7. What If We Are Not After All, All Destined for Greatness?
8. I’ll Show You, I’ll Show You All

Released May 15,2001

Recorded by Casey Rice, Jeremy Lemos, and Elliot Dicks, 10/99-5/00
Edited and Mixed by Casey and Tim 1/01-2/01

Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side Music
Photo by Rachel Humphrey
Graphic Design by Paul Koob

So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness

Tim Kinsella, JOAN OF ARC‘S lead man, has amassed a collection of songs culled from a variety of sources – sketches begun on his computer at home and collaborations with kindred spirits from coast to coast – and given them life. Further gussied up with help from a plethora of fellow Chicago luminaries, this is a career culmination of JOAN OF ARC‘S musical meanderings and genius in a concise, focused, and mature realization.

Recorded and mixed by Graeme Gibson at Clava Studios, Chicago. July – September 2002.
Mastered by Mike Hagler at Kingsize Studios, Chicago.

1. On a Bedsheet In the Breeze On the Roof
2. The Infinite Blessed Yes
3. Perfect Need and Perfect Completion
4. Olivia Lost
5. Diane Cool and Beautiful
6. Mr. Participation Billy
7. Mean to March
8. Hello Goodnight Good Morning Goodbye
9. Dead Together
10. Madelleine Laughing
11. Staying Alive and Lovelessness

Live in Chicago

It’s not really a live album, but it’s certainly an experience. Four months of studio time culminate in thirteen interwoven tracks that ultimately find Tim Kinsella’s inceptive lyrical style and primarily acoustic backdrop breathing comfortably alongside the band’s well-documented fetish for electronic embellishment. And the album artwork? Let’s just say that we’ll probably never meet another group of artists who are committed enough to rebuild the sets and reenact the scenes of an obscure foreign film for the sake of an album sleeve.

Tim Kinsella
Jeremy Boyle
Todd Mattei

Additional Musicians:

Scott Adamson: Drums on 1, 4
Bob Akai: Drums on 2, 3, 8
Nathaniel Braddock: Trumpet on 3
Kevin J. Frank: Piano on 9, Organ on 10
Mike Kinsella: Drums on 5
Noel Kupersmith: Bass on 2, 8
Ryan Rapsys: Drums on 6, 10
Chris Warland: Saxophone on 3
Jen Wood: Vocals on 6

Recorded October 1998
Released May 1999
Recorded mostly at Classsicks, some at Truckstop West, a little at home, and
even some at Sherry and Lenora’s home
Recorded, Mixed, Produced, Programmed and Processed by Casey Rice
Additional Recording on Tracks 1, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, & 13 by Elliot Dicks
Additional Recording & Editing on Tracks 1, 6 by Scott Adamson
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Set Design and Construction by JOA
Photography by Andy Mueller
Renaissance Portrait Replication by Edgar Bryan
Art Direction by JOA, Andy Mueller, & Jason Gnewikow
Layout by Jason Gnewikow

1. It’s Easier To Drink On An Empty Stomach Than To Eat On A Broken Heart
2. Who’s Afraid of Elizabeth Taylor?
3. If it Feels / Good, do it
4. Live in Chicago, 1999
5. (I’m 5 Senses) none of them Common
6. Me (Plural)
7. I’m certainly not pleased with my options for the future
8. When the Parish School dismisses and the Children running sing
9. Thanks for Chicago, Mr. James
10. (In Fact I’m) Pioneering New Emotions
11. Better De’d Than Read
12. Sympathy for the Rolling Stones
13. All until the Greens reveal themselves at dawn

A Portable Model Of

The first of several high-flying conceptual works to come from the JOAN OF ARC compound is a eminently eclectic affair – organic and electronic, ironic and earnest, familiar, yet wholly irregular. It’s a balance that allows this Chicago-based group to walk on the fringe without being swallowed by it. You’ll feasibly end up scratching your head as much as you wind up nodding it, but if you didn’t, you’d probably be missing the point.

Mike Kinsella: Guitar on 4, 10; drums on 2, 3, 10
Ann-Marie Rounkle: Vocals on 2
Ryan Rapsys: Drums on 6, 8, 12
Jay Gabarck: Guitar on 3
Davey vonBohlen: Vocals on 6
Nathaniel Braddock: Effectron on 7
Azita Yousefi: “Explain water to the Fish”

Recorded December 1996 – March 1997
Released June 1997

Tracks 1, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11 Recorded & Mixed by Elliot Dicks & JOA at Elliots
loft
Tracks 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 13 Recorded & Mixed by Casey Rice at Idful Music,
IL
Edited by D. Signer at Dance Hall Classikx
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Illustration by Jeremy Boyle
Graphics by Jason Gnewikow
Photography by Ann-Marie Rounkle

1. I Love A Woman (who loves me)
2. The Hands
3. Anne Aviary
4. Let’s Wrestle
5. Romulans! Romulans!
6. Post Coitus Rock
7. Count To a Thousand
8. How Wheeling Feels
9. In Pompeii
10. Caliban
11. In Pamplona
12. I Was Born
13. (I love a Woman) Who Loves Me

How Memory Works

Hardly a singles album, the second full-length for this Chicago avant-rock troupe is a diverse collection of material that brings the band dabbling in electro-ambient and finding new inspiration in the studio-as-instrument concept. At the same time, we’d deceptive if we neglected to mention that certain tracks – like the startling "This Life Cumulative" and "God Bless America" – just plain rock the old fashioned way. But we wouldn’t want to spoil your preconceptions.

Tim Kinsella
Sam Zurick
Jeremy Boyle
Eirc Bocek
Mike Kinsella

Additional Muscians:

Marty Ackley: Musical Saw on 9
Zach Fiocca: Vibraphone on 3
Julie Pomerleau: Violin, Viola on 3, 11
Griffin Rodriquez: Cello on 3

Recorded October 1997 – February 1998
Released May 1998

Tracks 2, 4, 6, 8, & 10 recorded at Electrical Audio, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Casey Rice
Assistance by Rob Bochnik & Greg Norman
Tracks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, & 11 recorded at Truckstop, and Elliot Dicks’ old loft
Engineered & Mixed by Elliot
Sequenced by K.C. at Dan’s Hal Klazzikz
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Cover Painting by Jeremy Boyle
Layout by Jason Gnewikow

1. Honestly Now
2. Gin & Platoni
3. To’ve Had Two Of
4. This Life Cumulative
5. A Pale Orange
6. White Out
7. So Open; Hooray
8. A Name
9. Osmosis Doesn’t Work
10. God Bless America
11. A Party Able Model Of

The Gap

Juxtaposing more traditional acoustic arrangements against artificial future sounds, JOAN OF ARC has created The Gap (JT1053). Going way overboard and exhausting every option, with up to 100 tracks on certain songs, "The Gap" bears witness to a band evolving and crafting beautiful new territory. Use headphones and close your eyes.

Tim Kinsellas
Todd Mattei
Matt Clark
Jeremy Boyle
Mike Kinsella

Additional Musicians:

Tania Bowers: Backing Vocals on 2, 8
Rebecca Gates: Backing Vocals on 2, 3
Ryan Hembrey: Upright Bass on 3, 8
Damon Locks: Backing Vocals on 2
Julie Pommerleau: Viola, Violin on 3, 8

Recorded October 1999 – June 2000
Released September 2000

Recorded at Classicks, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Casey Rice
Additional Recording at Soma & Engine by Sheik Labod
at Elliotsound and on location by Elliot Dicks, and
at Bedside Manor by Jeremy Lamos
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Paul Koob
Photography by Todd Mattei

1. (You) Can Not See (You) [Me] as (I) [You] (Can)
2. As Black Pants Make Cat Hairs Appear
3. Knife Fights Every Night
4. John Cassavetes, Assat Shakur, And Guy Debord walk into a bar…
5. Another Brick at the Gap (part 2)
6. Zelda
7. "Pleasure isn’t Simple"
8. Me and America (or) The United Colors of the Gap
9. Your Impersonation this Morning of Me Last Night
10. Outside the Gap

Method & Sentiment

It’s not every day that you come across music as innovating as it is pleasurable, but Chicago’s JOAN OF ARC – as art-damaged as they are endearing – manage to accomplish just that with this three-song EP. Acoustic guitars, diffusive recording techniques, and computer tricknology lie underneath former Cap’n Jazz ringleader Tim Kinsella’s clever wordplay and wholly distinctive vocals to comprise one of the most engaging debut recordings we’ve ever had the pleasure to work with.

Tim Kinsella: Vocals, Guitar
Mike Kinsella: Guitar
Jeremy Boyle: Guitar, Electronics
Erik Bocek: Bass
Samuel Zurick: Drums

Additional Musicians:

Nathaniel Braddock: Trumpet

Recorded September 1996
Released October 1996

Recorded at Soma, IL
Engineered & Mixed by Elliot Dicks
Mastered by Michael Sarsfield at Frankford Wayne, NYC
Lettering by Marlene Boyle
Sphere & Stool Constructed by Jeremy Boyle
Graphics by Jason Gnewikow
Photography by Ann-Marie Rounkle

1. Didactic Prom
2. Please Sleep
3. Trial at Orleans

Interview : Tim Kinsella

For the past decade or so, Tim Kinsella has challenged the conventions, trends, and occasionally even the patience of his audience with the numerous projects he’s been involved with- Cap’n Jazz, Owls, Friend/Enemy, Joan Of Arc, and, most recently, Make Believe. While most of Kinsella’s work is typically hit-or-miss fare, Make Believe seems to have accrued a new sense of focus and direction for the singer. The group is described as "Owls without drug problems, Friend/Enemy with a consistent lineup and a practice schedule" and its press release even details a 7-point improvement plan:

#1 Would be a live band–all songs written as a band playing live.
#2 No-one was getting in unless they were down for the long haul–maintain a consistent lineup
#3 Practice every day–well over 40 hours a week–if they’re lucky enough to get away with living outside of the dominant culture as much as they are, they would work hard to maintan and justify such a privilege.
#4 No effect pedals
#5 No over-dubs
#6 Songs would have to speak for the collective not the individual singer
#7 Sound palette limited to classic rock band lineup to force new approaches to cliched shapes

Make Believe is currently touring the country with Sacramento instrumental spazzcore duo Hella and Philly’s lovable weirdos Need New Body on a splendid package tour that should be hitting your town shortly. It was on the Philly stop that I got a chance to sit down and chat with Mr. Kinsella about…well, a lot of things.

ScenePointBlank: So, how’s the tour going?

Tim Kinsella: It’s the greatest. Hella and Need New Body are my two favorite bands on the planet. I’ve been very lucky to be on the tour.

SPB: You obviously like working with a lot of different groups simultaneously- Joan of Arc, Owls, Make Believe, your solo project, etc. What do you find you get most out of this kind of musical multi-tasking? Do you find that each project serves a specific purpose?

TK: I don’t really know. I don’t really do anything else. Like, once a month I’ll rent a movie or my girlfriend will rent a movie and I’ll watch it with her. So, I maintain the pretense that I really love movies but I only see one a month. I don’t know. I don’t do anything else?°¦what was the question again?

SPB: What do you get out of working with different groups simultaneously?

TK: Oh?°¦I don’t know, man. [Long pause]

SPB: Do you feel like it’s somewhat limiting to work with one group at a time?

TK: No, I don’t feel limited. Honestly, I forget about the other groups when one is working. They never really conflict. It’s all very intuitive; there’s not much thought behind it all. We all just live in this warehouse together and play music with our friends all the time and record it. If we mass-produce what we record, then we can make a little money and if we do enough of that, then we don’t have to work as many hours each week and we get to do what we want. It’s all very selfish and intuitive. I’m like the luckiest person ever born. Think about [how] Americans right now are the most privileged people to ever be born on the planet and white males like me and you are the next tier of most privileged people to ever be born. But most dudes have to work and I just work 8 hours a week, 6 months a year, you know? I’m the luckiest human ever born. I just do whatever I want.

SPB: What do you do outside of music?

TK: Eh, fuck my girlfriend.

SPB: No, I meant for a living.

TK: Oh, I bartend a little bit. I’m really lucky. It’s a really good job.

SPB: I saw Owls at this exact same venue a little more than 2 years ago and you guys really blew me away. I was wondering if there was any chance of the group getting back together and maybe making another record or doing another tour?

TK: No, I wish we could. We tried to for years. This Make Believe sort of started with me and Sam [Zurick, guitarist for Cap’n Jazz/Joan of Arc/Owls/Make Believe] really wanting Owls to work and not being able to make it work. It just grew out of that impulse.

SPB: Tell me a little bit about Make Believe.

TK: We hang out together all day, every day. It’s more of a lifestyle than any conscious decisions.

SPB: You guys are all based out of Chicago, right?

TK: Yep.

SPB: I noticed that over the years, you’ve worked with a lot of the same people on your projects. Is this an issue of comfort or necessity or…?

TK: Just intuition. My friends are my friends. My family is my family. It’s who I know.

SPB: Have you ever thought of working with people outside of that little circle?

TK: Oh, yeah. I mean we all play with a lot of different people all the time. It’s all very open. I don’t know. Very little thought goes into any of it. There’s a lot of concentration in the immediate all the time. But as far as any sort of distance, thought, or perspective about it, it doesn’t really happen. It’s just really being involved in the moment. I feel like?°¦I don’t know if this might be a tangent, but it seems to me when we travel a lot and we see friends from high school or if I have to explain what I do to an aunt I see every couple of years or something, they’ll be like, “I saw you in some magazine! You’ve really made it!” And it’s like, “Really? I’ve done way cooler things than that magazine. Is this really your idea of success?” So it’s like this differed idea. And I feel like sort of mainstream, white consumer culture America is based on differing to the future. Sort of like, “I’m doing this right now because it’s going to get me this”. But they never get there, you know? So we sort of always work in the moment. That’s the kind of thing: being engaged in the immediate. So a lot of concentration goes into the moment, but as far as any greater strategy with any distance perspective, it never really happens. Does that make any sense?

SPB: Yeah, absolutely.

TK: Sorry if I’m babbling.

SPB: No, not at all. I think it’s kind of a noble way of approaching your craft. I mean, I make my own music and I’ve noticed that a lot of it is sort of based around the end result- I find that a lot of music is, actually. So I guess you could say that I’ve been trying to move away from that approach.

TK: Yeah, with the end result you’ll never get there.

SPB: Yeah, what is this end result anyway?

TK: Die.

SPB: How did you hook up with Jade Tree? Joan Of Arc seems like kind of a weird fit for the label, doesn’t it?

TK: It is a weird fit and it really isn’t a fit anymore. The new Joan of Arc record comes out in August on Polyvinyl. I don’t know. We knew ?°»em. I was 20 years old or 19 years old and they were my only friends who had a record label.

SPB: What do you think of the new crop of Jade Tree artists?

TK: Oh, I don’t know. I really appreciate everything they’ve done for us. I have nothing but good feelings towards them but it’s not a thing that has anything to do with me, really. I think they’re the greatest and I really appreciate what they do, but I don’t really?°¦what was the question? What do I think of their new artists?

SPB: Yeah.

TK: I don’t know. I wish the best for them. It’s weird to be sitting in this space and not be hanging out with them- this is usually when I see them on a tour. They’re friends of mine and I care about them. I have a hard time judging bands or music because very few things are really exciting to me. There’s, like, Lungfish, Need New Body, Hella, Uzeda, U.S. Maple, Will Oldham?°¦I don’t know. I buy a lot of old records. I can’t keep up.

SPB: I was actually going to ask you what you were listening to lately.

TK: I’ve been listening to a lot of the Harry Smith Anthologies of Folk Music, Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, Van Morrison, Bauhaus?°¦I don’t really keep up. I sort of feel like who am I to say what’s good or bad? There are people who sort of blow my mind as to what they can do. It never ceases to amaze me when I see some bands?°¦how did people get together and decide to make this sound? It’s not even a decision, you know? I know from doing it myself that it’s some sort of instinct or a challenge. There’s a lot of genre bands out there who seem to satisfy some sort of need in people, but I don’t feel like I’m qualified to say what’s good or bad.

SPB: What excites you about those artists?

TK: I think with Hella, every single measure is a surprise. It seems like an impossible feat over and over. Have you seen them?

SPB: Yeah, they’re great.

TK: And with Need New Body, it’s like their minds have been blown wide open and anything is possible. I just love that. And someone like Will Oldham, I just feel like is a master of a very traditional style of writing. I really appreciate that. Personally, I don’t have that kind of discipline. I don’t feel like I could master that sort of thing. But I don’t feel like I could name what I’m really drawn to in anything that I’m drawn to. That’s part of my secret mind that really controls me. My conscious mind just fucks that up.

SPB: Your lyrics have always seemed to lean towards the mysterious or abstract- or abstract to me, at least. Could you tell me what sorts of processes are involved in your approach as a wordsmith or what sorts of things go through your head when you’re writing lyrics?

TK: I don’t know, man. [Long pause] I work on it constantly. I never really sit down and write. Maybe once every 2 or 3 days, I’ll sit down and write for an hour. Actually, it’s more like every 5 days, I’ll sit down and write for an hour. But usually it’s just I make notes to myself maybe one minute every fifteen minutes, like, ?°»oh, there’s a real ring to that phrase’ or ?°»how about that birds nest in the chandelier’. It’s just an amazing world. If they’re abstracted, it’s not to be difficult. I did this interview before the show and this woman asked me, “Why do you have to be so obtuse and difficult? It’s sort of elitist”. That sort of disappoints me because I feel like in my mind it’s more open-

SPB: Open to interpretation?

TK: Yeah. To be like, “this song is yours”. It’s out of respect to the audience more than trying to baffle everyone. I don’t like being told what to do. I don’t like the two-party democratic system. I don’t like any of the bombardment of ?°»everybody needs to own a car’, ?°»everyone’s shoes are made for them somewhere far away’, ?°»everyone needs to eat meat’. There are people suffering everywhere for the privileges that we have and- this is a tangent- it’s my own guilt. I’m aware of this and I don’t know what I’m doing here. It’s amazing to me at the very core that I’m alive and I feel this breeze on me right now and that I’m talking to you and I don’t know?°¦like, what is this? Why are we animated? Why do we walk around? It’s fuckin’ nuts, man. There’s zero reason for anything. The least I could do is try to offer something to people that they can relate to and make their own. It’s obviously not like joining the Peace Corps or building shelters for people in South America, but its-

SPB: You’re contributing something, at least.

TK: I don’t even mean that as some sort of justification for what I’m doing. It’s very selfish, but it’s all I can do. It’s what I do. I don’t think about it. I can’t help but write a lot of music. I don’t even remember ever deciding that I liked music. I mean, I know I can’t play music- I’m not a musician- but if this what I’m doing, the least I can do is be generous about it and make it the listeners’ instead of my own. I don’t want to tell people about like, “I got a broken heart/this girl’s so hot but she’s mean” or “start a revolution!” It’s meaningless, you know? It’s the same bombardment of school and the prison systems. I just want people to people to make it their own. Does that make sense?

SPB: Yeah, definitely.

TK: It’s very sad to me?°¦ah, nothing’s very sad to me.

SPB: No, go on.

TK: It bums me out sometimes like how I was saying how I did that interview earlier, the last thing it’s supposed to be is exclusive, but I can’t help how people read it, so it’s sort of like if I leave things open and someone sees that as exclusive, then it’s just them projecting their own insecurities. It’s all meant to be for the listeners to project themselves upon and make their own song.

TIM KINSELLA (S) ON [THE ROAD] AGAIN

So while we’ve all been biding our time, eating chips and watching Average Joe Hawaii JOAN OF ARC’S ever-prolific, never overly-pedantic Tim Kinsella has launched yet another creative outlet and planned a full US tour. Beginning February JOAN OF ARC, still hot on the heels of So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness[/I] LP/CD (JT1081), will be going coast to coast — bringing with them not only the tag team styling of Bobby Burg’s but also debuting Chicago’s newest bad boys, the Kinsella fronted Make/Believe.

More information is forthcoming and while we scurry to post updates you can read up on what the press had to say about So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness[/I] by scoping the links below.



Please consult the Joan of Arc for current dates.

JOAN OF ARC 2003 EURO TOUR UNDER WAY

Calling all European fans! JOAN OF ARC has just begun their first tour of Europe in celebration of their latest Jade Tree release, So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness LP/CD (JT081). Now is the chance to finally catch these Chicago wonders in their prime.

Please consult the Joan of Arc for current dates.

JOAN OF ARC EUROPEAN TOUR

JOAN OF ARC is headed to Europe for a massive tour in support of their much lauded So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness LP/CD (JT081). This is JOAN OF ARC’S first European tour ever, so it’s quite an event. After perfecting their sets on their recent US tour, the band is in top shape and ready to bring the full JOAN OF ARC experience to its legion of fans across the globe.

Please consult the Joan of Arc for current dates.

Joan of Arc [I]So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness[/I] Review

Since their inception in 1996, with Tim Kinsellas (Cap’n Jazz, Owls, Friend/Enemy) holding the reins, Joan of Arc have claimed to be on a mission to alienate fans with their music. Along the way, whether by accident or unproclaimed victory, they’ve released four full lengths, a single and an EP of very beautiful music.

Their styles have evolved from an expressively giddy art/emo rock to electro-acoustic lullabies to ProTools-chopped loops of acoustic orchestration. It seemed they’d accomplished their goal with a "posthumous" release that came across as a question of "what do we do now amongst these ashes and cinders?" The EP How Can Anything So Little Be Anymore?, laced with children singing in the background, seemed to show that the band had been reduced to a vulnerable state.

From those very ashes, however, Joan of Arc have re-birthed themselves. Stepping away from the ethereal and melodic drones and the ProTools chop and paste recording, they’ve released an album both haunting and "groove" oriented as they’ve ever been. Kinsellas has taken himself vocally to levels not unlike Stevie Nicks, engaging and at times menacing. The album only falters in that it lacks dynamics. It therefore files itself as background music by the end of its 11 seamless songs.

Joan of Arc [I]So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness[/I] Review

Tim Kinsella must be tired and worn out. Given the exuberant poet schoolboy sounds in the Owls album that were trying so hard – too hard, maybe? Yes, I think so – and the typical "we owe the listener nothing" shtick of previous Joan of Arc albums, it would seem that Kinsella has calmed down a bit. So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness is one of the more restrained performances that the band has produced of late (because, let’s be fair, every project Kinsella is a part of is essentially the same band) and it works greatly to their advantage.

The Owls album was a difficult record to pin down for me. Where I loved the musicianship, there were more than a few songs where I kept hoping fervently that Tim would just shut the fuck up and let the music play. But he didn’t and over the period of a few months, the frustration of having songs marred repeatedly by Ego-Boy’s overbearing vocals lead to the eventual negative review the album got.

But maybe that was the end of it. With that album, the great purge that it was, he got it all out of his system, took a deep breath and decided that maybe his project ought to be a little more evenly executed and So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness is born. Essentially, still the Kinsella formula, but more along the lines of pre-The Gap era releases than the actual Gap album itself. Melody and song structure have returned in more classic form, but the blips and bleeps of How Memory Works have not, again to the disc’s benefit.

They just released a four DVD boxset of my movies (Kinjite / Messenger of Death / Murphy’s Law / 10 to Midnight). Go buy it and if you’ve got any cash left over, get the Joan of Arc CD.

Joan of Arc [I]So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness[/I] Review

Joan of Arc could be considered as one of the most fucked up bands to ever exist. Or, maybe Tim Kinsella should be given credit for being one of the most fucked up people to ever exist – considering he’s recognized as the band’s foundation; the brains, if you will. One listen to any of the band’s earlier five albums will have a puzzling effect on the listener. It’s not that their material is so difficult to take in – it’s more of a “How did these kids throw this together?” And that’s the great thing about Joan of Arc – they’re always pushing to outdo what they’ve done before, to never repeat sounds, and to always be one step ahead of the pack.

After spending two years of on-and-off-recording, with a full band, in an analog studio – that’s right, not one single computer was used – Kinsella and company have produced their most defining effort with So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness. The likes of Califone, longtime collaborator Sam Zurick (Owls, Cap’n Jazz), and renowned bandmate and brother Mike Kinsella (Owen) helped with the project.

If anything, this disc is comprehensive. It shakes new ground while refining a sound Joan of Arc displayed on previous releases such as their 1997 debut, A Portable Model Of. The structures are much more rock-based and play out much easier than on previous efforts with the stable of guitars, bass and drums. The overall tempo tends to lie on the upbeat, creating an overall pop awareness. Mike Kinsella’s drum beats are as sneaky as ever and the abundance of piano, horns, and bells is enough to make this performance worth every second they spent putting it to tape. Kinsella’s unmistakable, convulsive, off-key, yet by some means attractive vocals overflow the tracks with that sense of vastness and modesty long established by this prolific songwriter – much of the instrumentation does the same. At times the guitar work is incredibly conventional for Joan of Arc and at others it twangs an out-of-tune sense of progressiveness. Lyrically, Kinsella, once again proves that it’s not a matter of what you say, but how you say it. Most of his material does not translate well when simply reading it, therefore when Kinsella jovially spits out his unabashed words, the content can more closely be grasped. Use your imagination.

It would be tough to find a track on So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness that won’t satisfy even your average Joan of Arc fan, let alone the cult of art rockers that have followed the act’s every move over the last seven years. With all its carefully planned sounds, intriguing melodies, articulate structures and authentic recording this album is not something to simply throw in the collection. It’s something to commemorate as a release that would, in a perfect world, be recognized for what it is – a success.

JOAN OF ARC "SO MUCH STAYING ALIVE AND LOVELESSNESS" LP/CD (JT081) AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER TODAY

JOAN OF ARC So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness LP/CD (JT081) available for pre-order today (Out February 4, 2003). Get it now and get it early.

Tim Kinsella (CAP’N JAZZ, OWLS, FRIEND/ENEMY, EVERYONE), JOAN OF ARC’S lead man, is in constant musical flux. This flux allows Kinsella to consistently produce even as he simultaneously juggles three active bands. The result? Kinsella has amassed a collection of songs culled from a variety of sources-sketches begun on his computer at home and collaborations with kindred spirits from coast to coast-and given them life. Recorded and mixed by Graeme Gibson at Clava Studios and further gussied up with help from a plethora of fellow Chicago luminaries from CALIFONE, EDITH FROST, ISOPTOPE 217, UGLY CASSANOVA, BOAS, OWEN, PINEBENDER, RABBIT RABBIT, RED RED MEAT, NEED NEW BODY AND CHICAGO UNDERGROUND DUO, this is a career culmination of JOAN OF ARC’S musical meanderings and genius in a concise, focused, and mature realization.

MP3:

MP3:

TRACK LISTING

1. “On a Bedsheet in the Breeze on the Roof”
2. “The Infinite Blessed Yes”
3. “Perfect Need and Perfect Completion”
4. “Olivia Lost”
5. “Diane Cool and Beautiful”
6. “Participation Billy”
7. “Mean to March”
8. “Hello Goodnight Good Morning Goodbye”
9. “Dead Together”
10. “Madelleine Laughing”
11. “Staying Alive and Loveless”

RELATED RELEASES

CAP’N JAZZ Analpahbetapolothology DBL CD Discography JT1036
JOAN OF ARC Method & Sentiment 7” JT1028
JOAN OF ARC A Portable Model Of LP/CD JT1033
JOAN OF ARC How Memory Works LP/CD JT1037
JOAN OF ARC Live In Chicago, 1999 DBL LP/CD JT1042
JOAN OF ARC The Gap LP/CD JT1053
JOAN OF ARC How Can Anything So Little Be Any More CD EP JT1057
OWLS S/T LP/CD JT1059

Joan Of Arc Returns

Kinsella(s) is back. Owls are again playing shows, he has a few other new bands, and long-time project Joan Of Arc is
returning from death. The news is as simple as an 11-song album named So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness
is to be released by Jade Tree on February 4, 2003. The release is a collaboration of Kinsella with many of Chicago’s
finest (CALIFONE, EDITH FROST, ISOPTOPE 217, UGLY CASSANOVA, BOAS, OWEN, PINEBENDER, RABBIT RABBIT, RED RED MEAT, NEED
NEW BODY AND CHICAGO UNDERGROUND DUO).
Jade Tree has a few downloads already available for you to preview it, and they will soon be offering a pre-order of
the LP (12/9/2002).

NEW JOAN OF ARC RECORD ANNOUNCED

JOAN OF ARC will be releasing an 11-song record called So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness LP/CD (JT081) on February 4, 2003 (Available for pre-order December 9, 2002).

Tim Kinsella (CAP’N JAZZ, OWLS, FRIEND/ENEMY, EVERYONE), JOAN OF ARC’S lead man, is in constant musical flux. This flux allows Kinsella to consistently produce even as he simultaneously juggles three active bands. The result? Kinsella has amassed a collection of songs culled from a variety of sources-sketches begun on his computer at home and collaborations with kindred spirits from coast to coast-and given them life. Recorded and mixed by Graeme Gibson at Clava Studios and further gussied up with help from a plethora of fellow Chicago luminaries from CALIFONE, EDITH FROST, ISOPTOPE 217, UGLY CASSANOVA, BOAS, OWEN, PINEBENDER, RABBIT RABBIT, RED RED MEAT, NEED NEW BODY AND CHICAGO UNDERGROUND DUO, this is a career culmination of JOAN OF ARC’S musical meanderings and genius in a concise, focused, and mature realization.

TRACK LISTING

1. "On a Bedsheet in the Breeze on the Roof"
2. "The Infinite Blessed Yes"
3. "Perfect Need and Perfect Completion"
4. "Olivia Lost"
5. "Diane Cool and Beautiful"
6. "Participation Billy"
7. "Mean to March"
8. "Hello Goodnight Good Morning Goodbye"
9. "Dead Together"
10. "Madelleine Laughing"
11. "Staying Alive and Loveless"

RELATED RELEASES

CAP’N JAZZ Analpahbetapolothology DBL CD Discography JT1036
JOAN OF ARC Method & Sentiment 7Ó JT1028
JOAN OF ARC A Portable Model Of LP/CD JT1033
JOAN OF ARC How Memory Works LP/CD JT1037
JOAN OF ARC Live In Chicago, 1999 DBL LP/CD JT1042
JOAN OF ARC The Gap LP/CD JT1053
JOAN OF ARC How Can Anything So Little Be Any More CD EP JT1057
OWLS S/T LP/CD JT1059