Fewer Moving Parts

Known mostly for his tenure performing as Pedro the Lion, songwriter David Bazan recently retired the band moniker to continue making music under his own name. This debut EP finds the beloved Seattle songwriter roaring back to his creative roots, performing and recording everything himself in his home studio, while still expanding his sonic canvas. His signature songwriting, voice, and melodies are framed in layered harmonies, multi-tracked guitars, analog keyboards, and intricate production he was never able to fully realize with Pedro The Lion. The 10-song EP includes two different versions of five new Bazan songs. One version is stripped down acoustic and another version has full-instrumentation. Acclaimed graphic novelist, Zak Sally created new original artwork for the EP. Fewer Moving Parts is hands-down Bazan’s finest work to date.

1. Selling Advertising
2. How I Remember
3. Fewer Broken Pieces
4. Cold Beer and Cigarettes
5. Backwoods Nation
6. Selling Advertising (Acoustic)
7. How I Remember (Acoustic)
8. Fewer Broken Pieces (Acoustic)
9. Cold Beer and Cigarettes (Acoustic)
10. Backwoods Nation (Acoustic)

All songs by David Bazan. Eat My Flesh, Drink My Blood / BMI
Written, performed, recorded and mixed by David Bazan.
Last minute assistance and life saving TW Walsh.

Thank you: Ann-Krestene Bazan. Ellanor Bazan, Bob Andrews, Zak Sally, TW Walsh, David H Bazan, Vickey Bazan, Stuart Hallerman, Kevin Suggs, Tim, Darren and Mehron at Jade Tree, Trey Many, David Lewis, Adam Klavohn, David Dark

artwork and design: Zak Sally
management: Bob Andrews, Undertow Music
booking: Trey Many, Aero Booking

For more info, lyrics, and contact info please visit www.davidbazan.com

DAVID BAZAN TOUR BEGINS TODAY


Warning: implode() [function.implode]: Invalid arguments passed in /home/jadetree/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/extension-bbcode/Extension BBcode Bata.php on line 156

DAVID BAZAN is on his way to New York for the Jade Tree CMJ Showcase, but he’ll be stopping quite a bit along the way. If you haven’t yet been acquainted with the , now is your chance. The dates are listed below. For the most current tour information, see the .

10/11/2006 Nashville, TN @ Exit In
10/12/2006 Memphis, TN @ The Hi Tone
10/13/2006 Springfield, MO @ Randy Bacon Gallery
10/14/2006 Denton, TX @ Hailey’s
10/15/2006 Austin, TX @ The Parish
10/16/2006 Austin, TX @ The Proletariat
10/17/2006 New Orleans, LA @ Republic
10/18/2006 Tallahassee, FL @ The Beta Bar
10/19/2006 Orlando, FL @ The Social
10/20/2006 W. Columbia, SC @ New Brookland Tavern
10/21/2006 Chapel Hill, NC @ Local 506
10/22/2006 Atlanta, GA @ The Earl
11/03/2006 Brooklyn, NY @ North Six

Fewer Moving Parts CD EP is available from and the digital version is now available through , , , , , , , and .

TRACK LISTING:

1. Selling Advertising
2. How I Remember
3. Fewer Broken Pieces
4. Cold Beer and Cigarettes
5. Backwoods Nation
6. Selling Advertising (Acoustic version)
7. How I Remember (Acoustic version)
8. Fewer Broken Pieces (Acoustic version)
9. Cold Beer and Cigarettes (Acoustic version)
10. Backwoods Nation (Acoustic version)

BROOKLYN VEGAN TALKS TO DAVID BAZAN


Warning: implode() [function.implode]: Invalid arguments passed in /home/jadetree/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/extension-bbcode/Extension BBcode Bata.php on line 156

DAVID BAZAN recently spoke with Paula Pou of Brooklyn Vegan for an interview about everything from his new EP, Fewer Moving Parts to Pitchfork, " and more. Check it http://www.brooklynvegan.com/archives/2006/08/an_interview_wi_9.html|check it out here|EXTERNAL[/URL].

DAVID BAZAN just released the Fewer Moving Parts CD EP which is available from and the digital version is now available through , , , , , , , and .

TRACK LISTING:

1. Selling Advertising
2. How I Remember
3. Fewer Broken Pieces
4. Cold Beer and Cigarettes
5. Backwoods Nation
6. Selling Advertising (Acoustic version)
7. How I Remember (Acoustic version)
8. Fewer Broken Pieces (Acoustic version)
9. Cold Beer and Cigarettes (Acoustic version)
10. Backwoods Nation (Acoustic version)

For the latest tour dates, see the .

An interview with David Bazan

"David Bazan (born c. 1976) is an indie rock singer/songwriter from Edmonds, Washington. Bazan was the lead singer and creative force behind the now-defunct band Pedro the Lion and is currently the lead singer of Headphones, a band he formed out of his interest in synthesizers. Additionally, Bazan is a member of The Soft Drugs, a band fronted by former Pedro the Lion drummer T.W. Walsh." [Wikipedia]

"Bazan recorded his first solo project, the EP Fewer Moving Parts, in between touring as a member of The Undertow Orchestra."

BrooklynVegan interviewer Paula Pou caught up with Dave on the phone on August 8, 2006. They discussed his new EP, Low bassist Zak Sally, his favorite NYC venues, Deerhoof, Pitchfork, Micah Hinson, and more…

BrooklynVegan Paula: What’s up Dave? Finally catching some downtime?

Dave: Sort of. We had a project here at the house. We had some storage space, which was basically the old studio, that was full of random shit—more or less—and we brought it all out and had a garage sale. We had a busy weekend.

BrooklynVegan Paula: You’ve always been lauded for your storytelling as a songwriter. What was the writing process like to Fewer Moving Parts?

Dave: All of the songs were written when Pedro still existed last summer, except for “Fewer Broken Pieces,” which I just finished a couple of months ago. The rest of the songs had been written for a Pedro record when I thought there was still going to be a Pedro record. Toward the end of the last summer, around September, things started to disintegrate and I made the decision to drop the name. A couple of the songs seemed even more perfect for a David Bazan release.

BrooklynVegan Paula: Did you feel like you got away with being more open or honest?

Dave: It’s hard to know if I got away with it or not. I kind of have an ever-changing standard about that stuff. The first song on the EP, “Selling Advertising, “basically came out fully formed in 35 or 40 minutes and for better or worse I always feel that’s a strong indicator of it being true of what’s going on in my subconscious. To me that’s an important part of the writing process. It was the same thing with “Fewer Broken Pieces” too. It had been unfinished for months and I just sat down and started strumming one day and 20 minutes later it was done. I’m still working through how to be creative and how to pin down that process, but when something comes out that quickly and I like it, I usually tend to think that it means something and that the song should exist and be released for better or worse.

BrooklynVegan Paula: Why release two versions of each song on this EP?

Dave: The idea came about because I was really into the acoustic version of “Cold Beer and Cigarettes.” That was the very first demo that I made of it. When it was finished I demoed it several other times and none of the recordings were as compelling as the acoustic one. I wanted it to be on the EP, but I didn’t want the definitive version of the song to be just an acoustic guitar, so I started thinking about whether it would make sense to have both versions on there and then as I started interacting with the other songs, I started feeling similarly about all but one of the acoustic demos.

BrooklynVegan Paula: On “Selling Advertising” you go after music critics. Want to talk about Pitchfork?

Dave: To me, Pitchfork is a mixed bag. On the one hand I think it’s been really good for independent music culture and there are a lot of really deserving bands out there who might not have reached wide audiences as quickly as they did if it weren’t for Pitchfork. On the other hand, I think, there’s a dismissive tone to them if they don’t like a band—there’s a flippancy that I think is really destructive to the culture and the way that people think about music. I have a tendency to do that too—I think everyone does—to say, “Oh, that is totally worthless. That song or that book has no value.”

I read an interview with Dave Eggers in one of the weeklies and the guy interviewing him sort of snuck in a little jab at one of Ethan Hawke’s books in one of his questions and Eggers kind of snapped at him and said something along the lines of, “If you’ve ever written a book or made a record or created a painting, you’d know just how almost impossible it is to complete something like that.” At the very least you can’t dismiss a piece of art the way that we’ve become accustomed to. That interview made me think about the way that I do that and having seen that tendency so often in print, I don’t really think it’s right. I think a lot of places like Pitchfork are guilty of being dismissive for the sake of entertainment and popularity or to make themselves feel big. I don’t really know what the motivation is, but it bums me out.

BrooklynVegan Paula: With a song like “Backwoods Nation,” (MP3) which finds you inciting “rednecks” to “pick up machine guns and kill camel fuckers,” were you going for social criticism or just getting stuff off your chest?

Dave: When I wrote “Backwoods Nation” it was nothing more than expression. Sure, it made me feel like a big man when I wrote it and it still has that quality to it where it’s satisfying to make criticisms like that, but when I wrote it I was just mad as hell. It was a couple of days after 9/11 and our response as a country—how the leadership of the country was responding—to that?°¦I just couldn’t believe it. We’d be driving around the country just seeing some of the most public displays of bigotry that I’d experienced in my life—on bathroom walls, on bumper stickers and in conversations in diners. “Backwoods Nation” is just how I dealt with it. Playing it over the years, it still rang true to some degree although it is dismissive itself of certain people in a way that I think is not totally fair. It was another of those songs that came out fully formed and I don’t think it’s a definitive statement about what I think about all that stuff, but sometimes it still resonates with me when I play it.

BrooklynVegan Paula: So, you came in at #85 on Paste’s list of the 100 Best Living Songwriters. What does this mean to you?

Dave: It’s flattering, absolutely. But those lists are, you know?°¦Bob Dylan and Neil Young are the top and then the middle and end are kind of arbitrary. And there are a lot of totally great songwriters that I honestly think are far better than I am that weren’t on the list. I feel lucky that some people would consider listening to my music solely because I’m on that list, but it still seems arbitrary. Also, full disclosure, I know the editors at Paste. I don’t know if they would’ve put me on there if they didn’t know me, but at the least, people should be aware of that.

BrooklynVegan Paula: How did you hook up with (former Low bassist) Zak Sally for the EP artwork? What should we make of the Paul Bunyan-esque David Bazan on the cover?

Dave: Pedro played the first of many shows with Low in 2000 and we toured with them in 2001 and 2004. Zak and I became buddies and when he left Low and started focusing on his drawing, he went on a book tour and wanted musicians to play at his reading/signings. I played one, he ended up crashing at my house for a couple of days and we came up with the idea to collaborate on something or other and this is what we decided on. I was really honored that he wanted to work with me. Part of his payment was a hammerhead shark in a bottle that I got at Ye Olde Curiosity Shoppe down by the waterfront. They also had a pig with three heads in a jar down there.

Anyway, he came up with the cover on his own. The first thing he emailed me as a PDF was the cover and I was kind of freaked out by it. He’d warned me that the character on the cover was going to resemble me, but I still have mixed feelings about being on the cover. It was his thing though. The concept isn’t particularly flattering, but it’s complicated because when he left Low I think he sort of wished that the band would end and when it didn’t he came away with a lot of complicated feelings and I’m sure that informed what he drew and the way he presented it. I was really happy. It has a tension to it that I like and I’m glad he put it in there.

BrooklynVegan Paula: At the other end of the spectrum, what’s going on with your other post-Predo project, Headphones? Will your interest in synths seep into your full-length solo release?

Dave: I just played a show on with Tim Walsh as Headphones, but I think what I’m going to focus on right now is the David Bazan album. Headphones will come soon after that’s done.

As David Bazan I have a lot more freedom with instrumentation. My records will probably be all over the place, so yeah, there probably will be a lot of synths on there, but it’ll be in conjunction with a bunch of other things and Headphones is going to remain in just synths and drums, without other instrumentation.

BrooklynVegan Paula: I read an interview where you said breaking up Pedro had actually strengthened your friendship with Tim Walsh. Do you guys plan to collaborate? What’s he up to these days?

Dave: He’s trying to play Soft Drugs shows and selling the EP online. He’s also got a day job as a Web programmer for McGraw Hill Publishing. I think we’re going to hang out and go watch Miami Vice tonight. I see him every couple of days and we get to play a lot of music together. He’s my best friend, but it’s still complicated and we do make music together, but we’re trying to keep the boundaries pretty clear as far as the “Dave Bazan” thing is concerned so there are no misunderstandings and no hurt feelings.

BrooklynVegan Paula: You were on tour with Micah P. Hinson. Did you guys hit it off?

Dave: That guy’s awesome! He had a guy playing with him called Nick Phelps and we all just had a great time. It was a great tour.

BrooklynVegan Paula: Are you planning on hitting the road again soon?

Dave: There’s going to be another stream of little solo dates in Texas and the south in the near future and then once the record comes out around March or April, I’ll hit the road with a bigger tour. I would like to get a band together for that, but it’s hard to know how exactly that’s going to work out.

BrooklynVegan Paula: Is there anyone you’d like to round up for a band when you go on tour to promote the full-length?

Dave: Hopefully playing as Dave Bazan and having the baseline of that being a solo show would mean that I would get to goof around with a bunch of more people that I’ve gotten to in the past. I don’t know if it’ll happen during the upcoming tours, but I really hope to go over to some friends’ houses more often and make little recordings here and there.

BrooklynVegan Paula: Do you have any dream venues you’d like to play next time you’re in New York?

Dave: I’ve never really been to any big venues over there. I hear about Irving Plaza and Webster Hall, but I really like Bowery Ballroom—that’s one of my favorite venues in the country. I played at Southpaw a couple of times and that place was also pretty amazing. But I guess Clear Channel owns Irving now so that’s kind of out for the time being.

BrooklynVegan Paula: What are you listening to?

Dave: I really can’t stop listening to Deerhoof right now. I’m also listening to this 90s band from Nova Scotia called Local Rabbits—I’ve been listening to the shit out of their record.

Former Pedro the Lion Frontman Burns Bridges at Both Ends

The moving parts David Bazan currently needs fewer of are bandmates, specifically the ones he fired earlier this year when he dissolved Pedro the Lion, his long-running emo-rock combo. The pink-slipping hasn’t done much to alter his sound: These five solo songs (each presented in separate studio and acoustic versions) still throb with the tense folk-punk energy Pedro gifted to the Christian-music community Bazan has never felt comfortable claiming as his own. But it has sharpened his writing to an appealingly bitchy point—surprising, given that he can no longer hide from message-board scolds behind a band name. As he croons bitterly on "Backwoods Nation," "Calling all rednecks to put down their Sluggers/To pick up machine guns and kill camelfuckers." Opener "Selling Advertising" peels smaller potatoes, as Bazan breaks the news that Pitchfork staffers eat thanks to banner ads, not grants from the Green Party. But his vitriol is bracing. Dude could be indie’s P.J. O’Rourke.

David Bazan drops Pedro the Lion for his own name

As Pedro the Lion, David Bazan played melodic, atmospheric songs that earned him indie-rock acclaim. As the Headphones, he creates infectious electro-pop that has found him new fans.

Now Bazan has taken on two other roles: He’s a musician who performs under his own name and a new father.

Bazan performs at Modesto’s annual Xclamation Fest. Thousands of music fans are expected to crowd the city’s downtown for six hours of performances from the likes of Vanilla Ice, Marshall Tucker Band, Joe Diffie, Tone Loc and others.

::: Advertisement :::

The Seattle-based Bazan, 30, has a 22-month-old daughter, Ellanor, with wife Ann-Krestene. Fatherhood, he said, "has been amazing."

"I didn’t know it was possible to feel this way. The capacity for joy and potential regret just kind of exploded. There’s a lot that can go wrong."

Musically, Bazan is venturing out under his own name for the first time. He recently released the CD "Fewer Moving Parts."

Bazan retired the Pedro the Lion name last year, because it strained his relationship with his musical collaborators. Even though Pedro the Lion albums and concerts featured a variety of performers, the act was formed by and belonged to Bazan.

"It’s hard for anybody else to have ownership over Pedro the Lion when they know I’m going to just keep doing it, whether they’re going to do it or not," he said. "That was a dynamic that undermined any long-term relationship with anyone involved in Pedro the Lion."

He emphasized that he remains friends with his Pedro collaborators, particularly Seattle multi-instrumentalist Tim Walsh, who assisted with recording "Fewer Moving Parts." Bazan described the new CD as the result of his past musical errors.

"As you record albums, you learn little lessons here and there," he said. " ‘I shouldn’t have done it that way; I may have made a mistake.’ It’s sort of the product of me making mistakes."

The new album includes five songs, each performed once with electric instruments and once acoustically. Tracks such as the electric "The Devil is Beating His Wife" feature Bazan at his best, using his strong, clear voice and detailed lyrics to paint a scene for the listener.

Bazan transforms his songs and gives them new titles when he picks up an acoustic guitar. "The Devil is Beating His Wife" becomes "Cold Beer and Cigarettes," an echoing home-recorded song with a rhythmic guitar and short plucking solo.

Bazan considers "Fewer Moving Parts" his best work of his career.

"It is a culmination of everything I’ve done up to this point, sonically, lyrically and songwritingwise," he said.

The Phoenix native said he was introduced to music at a young age by his father, a music pastor. Growing up, Bazan played piano, clarinet and drums. He was limited in his musical performances, however, as his father frowned on secular music.

Bazan said he didn’t find rock until his early teens, when he began listening to the Beatles. A few years later, he discovered indie-rock and punk icon Ian MacKaye and his band Fugazi.

"There was an urgency there that gave it a sense of cool," Bazan said.

Formed in 1994, Pedro the Lion released four full-length albums, including the well-received "Achilles Heel" in 2004. Bazan created the Headphones around 2000 after being inspired by such technology-influenced albums as the Flaming Lips’ "The Soft Bulletin" and Radiohead’s "Kid A." The Headphones’ self-titled debut was released last year.

"I had just heard ‘The Soft Bulletin,’ and it was this ecstatic mess of electronics," he said. "It just sounds so cool."

New life

For a guy who writes lyrics like "lately I have been wondering why / we go to so much trouble / to postpone the unavoidable / and prolong the pain / of being alive," David Bazan is a remarkably easygoing dude.

"Generally I’m pretty optimistic," Bazan said via phone from his home just outside of Seattle. "I don’t let shit get me down. I wouldn’t characterize my life as a bummer at all."

You might not know it from listening to his music. Bazan, who until recently was the leader of indie-rock favorites Pedro the Lion, has always written songs chock-full of melancholy, if not outright depravity. From the self-doubt of his early, confessional work to concept albums about adultery and murder, his band’s output skewed toward the darker side.

Pedro the Lion disbanded earlier this year, and although the band was essentially a cast of revolving characters (most recently T.W. Walsh, who was Pedro’s only other member for the last few years), Bazan expresses some regret about going solo.

"I really came to depend on [Walsh] and to think of Pedro the Lion as him and I," Bazan said.

When Walsh decided he’d no longer be able to devote his time to the band, Bazan, who was burned out himself, pulled the plug. "I didn’t want to move forward as if everything was fine," Bazan said. "I felt like I was doing karaoke."

But jettisoning the Pedro tag seems to have reenergized Bazan. His first solo release, Fewer Moving Parts, is riskier and more varied than the last Pedro the Lion album, Achilles Heel. The new EP finds the songwriter–who played all the instruments– fleshing out his bittersweet pop songs with vocal harmonies, multitracked drums and synthesizers. There are 10 tracks on the record, but only five songs; each one presented in both a full band and acoustic version. It sounds like a cop-out, filler–until you hear the stark disparity between the different takes.

"I wanted everybody who hears the full-band version to be able to hear the acoustic version," he said. "It reveals something about the [songwriting] process, and I like that."

Although he was making a "full band" recording, Bazan fell in love with the acoustic version of "Cold Beer and Cigarettes" and decided he wanted it on the album, eventually deciding to do the same with each of the tracks.

Lyrically, Fewer Moving Parts is as dark and acerbic as ever: Bazan baits critics on the upbeat "Selling Advertising," which taunts music writers (the Internet is abuzz with the news that the track is directed at the editor of indie-snob Web site Pitchfork Media) and mocks "how satisfying it must be" to review other people’s work. Elsewhere, the EP touches on equally contentious issues like the singer’s faith–"Am I a Christian?" he sings, leaving the answer up to fans and critics who have chided Bazan for his apparent religiosity or lack thereof.

The final track, a chugging rocker called "Backwoods Nation," is a brutally ironic call to arms, asking frat boys "to trade in their hazing / their keggers and cocaine / and casual date-raping / for cabinet appointments / and rose-garden tapings."

Bazan calls himself "pretty leftist," and though he wrote the song (which also takes a jab at the current administration) soon after 9/11, he has not released it on an album until now.

"It was suggested to me by my manager," Bazan said. "He was furious about some shit Cheney had said, and he was like, ‘You gotta put that fucking song on the record.’"

Bazan does seem angry and morose when you see his lyrics on paper, but the inventive (and even catchy) pop music he marries them to can only be the work of an optimist–a cautious optimist.

"I love being alive and I love people," he admits. "But my analysis of human history, of the arc of it–it’s bad."

David Bazan Review

David—the artist formerly known as Pedro the Lion—Bazan just made me feel like shit: The song "Selling Advertising," from his new EP, Fewer Moving Parts, begins like this: "You’re so creative/ With your reviews/ Of what other people do/ How satisfying that must be/ For you." Yeah, that bites a little, but it pales in comparison with my disturbing realization of how applicable his examination of blindly patriotic rednecks, "Backwoods Nation"—which I first heard in 2002 on a Jade Tree compilation—still feels, four years after its original release. Never one to skirt the issues, Bazan’s new songs—which pretty much sound like Pedro plus keyboards—are as biting and beautiful as ever. And Parts contains two versions of each song, one played all simple acoustic style, the other recorded with full instrumentation. Pick either version and you’ll hear Bazan examine unsettling and interesting characters with exactly the wit and honestly you’ve come to expect from him, an artist whose work is important and hard-to-stomach for exactly the same reason—because he’s just so fuckin’ smart.

David Bazan [I]Fewer Moving Parts[/I] Review

I downloaded this from eMusic following this recommendation from Scott at Stereogum:

I was never a huge Pedro The Lion fan, so David Bazan’s excellent new EP finds me totally off guard.
I, too, have never quite felt the Pedro love, lumping them into that large category of Pleasant And All, But Forgettable. I downloaded an album from Bazan’s electronic side project, Headphones, and it didn’t really wake me up, either.

This disc, on the other hand, might just change my mind. Its five songs are each presented twice, once with a full band and once in a stripped-down acoustic setting. This not only highlights what great songs they are, but it also helps them get stuck in your head.

There isn’t a whole lot of metaphor or subtlety in the songwriting here. The title track is a fairly straightforward exploration of why Bazan split up PtL and went solo. Other tracks are similarly conversational, making it a nice chaser after the relative floweriness of, say, Sufjan Stevens.

David Bazan vs. Ryan Pitchfork / Live MP3s

I was just thinking how Pedro the Lion never seems to get enough credit a few days ago. Before Sufjan blew up and became known as the indie rock christian singer-songwriter there was Pedro the Lion and also Jeremy Enigk. I was really happy to see that Bradley’s Almanac posted MP3s from David Bazan’s show this past Monday at TT the Bear’s in Cambridge. The sound quality as usual from Bradley’s is amazing and there is some really interesting stuff including a song "Selling Advertising" aimed at Ryan Schreiber (head of Pfork) and some interesting Q&A.

"Selling Advertising. Yes. It’s about Ryan Schreiber. Yeah, it’s about him. It’s specific. You guys know who that is? He’s the most powerful guy in your guys’ indie rock world. You don’t know? Well, that’s good. Yeah, it’s kind of about him. His last name is Jewish sounding. I don’t believe that Jewish people run the media. My friend misinterpreted that. I’m going to play that song now.

I’m really proud of that one. It’s actually not the best song I ever wrote. My cousin thinks it’s shitty because it’s not open-ended at all. You can figure out exactly what it means.
But I think people got to speak. Truth to power. And no one’s got any balls when it comes to Pitchfork. No one’s standing up and saying ‘Fuck you man.’ So, someone’s got to. I’ll probably get a 0.0 for it…."

DAVID BAZAN "FEWER MOVING PARTS" DIGITAL DOWNLOAD (JT1121) AVAILABLE TODAY


Warning: implode() [function.implode]: Invalid arguments passed in /home/jadetree/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/extension-bbcode/Extension BBcode Bata.php on line 156

Known mostly for his tenure performing as PEDRO THE LION, songwriter DAVID BAZAN recently retired the band moniker to continue making music under his own name. His debut EP finds the beloved Seattle songwriter [who was recently named #85 in Paste Magazine's Top 100 Living Songwriters] roaring back to his creative roots, performing and recording everything himself in his home studio, while still expanding his sonic canvas. His signature songwriting, voice, and melodies are framed in layered harmonies, multi-tracked guitars, analog keyboards, and intricate production he was never able to fully realize with PEDRO THE LION. The 10-song EP includes two different versions of five new Bazan songs. One version is stripped down acoustic and another version has full-instrumentation. Acclaimed graphic novelist, Zak Sally created new original artwork for the EP.

Fewer Moving Parts is hands-down Bazan’s finest work to date. In celebration Bazan will take his act on the road heading west with recent Jade Tree signee, MICAH P. HINSON, in tow. As the year unfolds Bazan will huddle up in his Seattle studio to begin work on his full length, due tentatively to be released in 2007.

Fewer Moving Parts CD EP is available from and the digital version is now available through , , , , , , , and .

TRACK LISTING:

1. Selling Advertising
2. How I Remember
3. Fewer Broken Pieces
4. Cold Beer and Cigarettes
5. Backwoods Nation
6. Selling Advertising (Acoustic version)
7. How I Remember (Acoustic version)
8. Fewer Broken Pieces (Acoustic version)
9. Cold Beer and Cigarettes (Acoustic version)
10. Backwoods Nation (Acoustic version)

For the latest tour dates, see the .

David Bazan [I]Fewer Moving Parts[/I] Review

Known mostly for his tenure performing as Pedro the Lion, songwriter DAVID BAZAN recently retired the band moniker to continue making music under his own name. On his debut self-released EP "FEWER MOVING PARTS,” his signature songwriting, voice, and melodies are framed in layered harmonies, multi-tracked guitars, analog keyboards, and intricate production he was never able to fully realize with Pedro The Lion. The 10-song EP includes two different versions of five new Bazan songs — one version is stripped down acoustic and another version has full-instrumentation. -

David Bazan – [I]Fewer Moving Parts[/I] Review

I was never a huge Pedro The Lion fan, so David Bazan’s excellent new EP finds me totally off guard. Fewer Moving Parts is a collection of five accessible, even poppy, dirges about familiar themes of control: women, drinking, going solo ("I still run the show/ Don’t you forget it … I do and I don’t/ think I’m better off alone.") Cleverly, the 85th greatest living songwriter gives two versions of each song, a fleshed out guitar assault and an alternately titled stripped-down slo-core take.

Here’s my favorite tune. Not sure which version I like better, this or the acoustic one ("Don’t Cry I’m Not Gonna Hurt You") on which he coos the organ solo.

David Bazan – "How I Remember" (MP3)

Former Low bassist and graphic novel artist Zak Sally did the artwork, which I wouldn’t mention if it wasn’t so striking.

David’s working on a full-length for release next year on Jade Tree and is playing some shows later this month with Micah P. Hinson:

Wed 07/19 Portland OR @ Doug Fir
Thu 07/20 Eugene OR @ WOW Hall
Fri 07/21 Chico CA @ 1078 Gallery
Sat 07/22 Modesto CA @ Xclamation Festival
Sun 07/23 Pomona CA @ Glass House
Mon 07/24 San Diego CA @ The Casbah
Tue 07/25 Los Angeles CA @ Tangiers
Thu 07/27 San Francisco CA @ Bottom of the Hill
Sat 07/29 Seattle WA @ Tractor Tavern

Bazan vs. Pitchfork

Apparently Pedro the Lion frontman David Bazan (pictured) didn’t like the 4.7 rating his band’s last record was given by online music zine Pitchfork. Head over to his Myspace page to hear the nasty criticism Bazan slings back at the Chicago tastemakers in his song "Selling Advertising." For now, here is a taste of what you’ll hear: "You’re so creative with your reviews of what other people do. How satisfying that must be for you …" Feel the sting!

DAVID BAZAN [I]FEWER MOVING PARTS[/I] REVIEW

As I finalized my half-year list of 2006 favorite books and music, I was listening to Fewer Moving Parts (which incidentally made the list), the new solo EP from Pedro the Lion frontman David Bazan.

The EP is unique, in that Bazan offers five songs, then the stripped-down demos of the same songs (in the same order). Surprisingly, I love both the studio and demo versions. Where the studio songs excel musically, the demos bring Bazan’s songwriting to the forefront.

David Bazan- How I Remember

Bazan, the man behind such bands as Pedro the Lion and Headphones, has officially retired the PTL moniker with his latest release, even though the band has always been his sole project. In typical Bazanian brashness, the song "Fewer Broken Pieces" addresses his new solo venture, saying that he had to fire some band members who weren’t holding up their end. His new Fewer Moving Parts EP (which features artwork by Zak Sally from the band Low) has five songs, but includes two versions of each: a stripped-down acoustic version and a full-band version. The different sounds emcompass all of Bazan’s work over the years, from his 4-track recording days, to his full-band mid-career sound, to the electronic splash of Headphones. Despite being only an EP this new album features some of Bazan’s best work. It’s been a while since he was so angry, seething, and gritty. Bazan saves much of his bile on the track below, which Bazan has said is about Ryan Schreiber of Pitchfork. While I was a little put off by this information, Bazan has a way of making the song more about himself, about his faith, and his desire to be accepted more than it is about Schreiber, again proving why Bazan is one of the best lyricists out there.

David Bazan [I]Fewer Moving Parts[/I]

Score (out of 10): [9.1]

When Pedro the Lion’s David Bazan decided to drop the moniker and go solo, it came as a disappointment to many. After all, Pedro the Lion had released a ton of incredible albums, including 2002’s Control, containing some of the best lyrical work of any singer/songwriter of the past 10 years. With Bazan’s side project Headphones, nobody expected him to release material this early after going solo. Bazan by himself seemed strange to me. How could he exist without bandmate and longtime friend T.W. Walsh? Bazan proved to not only me, but the rest of the world, that a name is just a name. This release contains some of Bazan’s strongest and most controversial work to date, especially lyrically. Taking pages from each of his project’s books, Bazan combines his trademark somber, smooth vocals from Pedro the Lion with some electronic effects from Headphones (especially in “Cold Beer and Cigarettes”) to create the most expansive work of his career. Though the album is only 5 songs, there are 2 versions of each song. The first 5 tracks feature a full backing band, while the last 5 are stripped down, acoustic and raw versions of each song.

Lyrics have always been Bazan’s strong point. Historically, they’ve been surprisingly simple yet full of relatable imagery, nothing has changed on this record. The upbeat and uncharacteristically cheery number “That’s How I Remember” speaks of Bazan’s personal requirements of having a few drinks before he goes out in public, suggesting previous social inadequacy. Bazan never steers away from disclosing uncomfortable realities of his personal life in his songs, and that only becomes more evident on “Fewer Broken Pieces.” Here, Bazan laments on his decision to go solo, confessing that “Don’t think I don’t regret it/because I do and I don’t think I’m better off alone/Man I could have had a big sound/But I love to let my friends down.” This view into Bazan’s personal life allows the listener to connect with him on a level that most artists don’t achieve with their listeners. Lines like “One good friend remarks with a rightfully angry/Jesus, dude?°¦none of us know what to do with you” make you feel for Bazan in his lament.

In addition to his personal confessions, Bazan has not shied away from controversial topics, as “Backwards Nation” speaks of men picking up machine guns to kill “camel fuckers.” Of course, these lyrics, when placed into context, are social commentaries instead of racial slurs. Still, Bazan’s addressing of rednecks and frat boys are biting and unsettling, as one can feel his anguish through his words.

As far as the music itself goes, it’s a pleasant surprise to hear Bazan use such widely varied instrumentation in his EP, but still offer up stripped down singer/songwriter versions of the songs (like some older Pedro the Lion fans may be used to). Bazan is lyrically driven, yet still makes his music hauntingly infectious by paralleling guitar lines and tempo amazingly with his vocal delivery. Fewer Moving Parts will please Pedro the Lion fans from all eras. Anybody who appreciates artists that bare their soul should give this EP a listen, as Bazan is a songwriter who is simply unmatched in his ability to invoke emotion in a listener while the listener actually cares for Bazan’s own well-being. While often depressing and despondent, Bazan takes his listeners on a 5 song lyrical journey for what will almost undoubtedly end up as the EP of the year. While not as strong as several Pedro the Lion releases, David Bazan’s solo debut is still fantastic and is a wonderful teaser for his upcoming full-length.

David Bazan Show (Philly)

I just got back from the David Bazan (formerly Pedro the Lion) show at the World Cafe Live in Philadelphia. It was pretty sweet. He had a good set, a good mixture of old stuff, recent stuff, and brand new stuff. Some songs I remember off the top of my head (which I won’t tag because I actually find it profoundly annoying that whenever I come across a song title in someone’s journal entry, I have to read the name of the artist beforehand every time): "Slow and Steady Wins The Race", "Priests and Paramedics", "Transcontinental", "Options", "Bands With Managers", a cover of Randy Newman’s "Political Science", "Foregone Conclusions" (it wasn’t on his set, but we convinced him to play us an extra one), and "Winners Never Quit" as a closer. And of course a few songs from his new EP entitled "Fewer Moving Parts."

I had a great time, partly because of the great music and partly because Jeremy, Nate, Jacob and I got an amazing table just five feet away from Mr. Bazan. Plus I had some great interaction with the man himself during a couple Q&A sessions, and I got several good laughs out of both him and the audience. I was pretty pleased with myself, but obviously that’s not the point.

I’m looking forward to his full-length coming out next year… I hope it’s less cynical than his past stuff, but I’m not counting on it.

Mp3s: David Bazan live in Cambridge, MA

First, the semi-straight facts: In the beginning, Pedro the Lion was David Bazan, and David Bazan was Pedro the Lion. A revolving cast of musical friends made up the studio and touring band, and he/they released a couple 7-inches, an EP, and then his/their first full length, the brilliant ‘It’s Hard To Find a Friend’, on Seattle’s Made in Mexico Records in 1998. Their next stop was Jade Tree, who re-released the album, co-released another EP, and then put out the second disc, ‘Winners Never Quit’, in 2000. A couple excellent full-lengths later, frequent touring bassist TW Walsh (a damn fine songwriter in his own right, but more on the great new Soft Drugs EP later this week) became an official PTL member, and helped create what would become their last official output, ‘Achilles Heel’, in 2004. Meanwhile, David had decided to record some songs sans-guitar, just keys and drums, so his newly named Headphones released a debut disc in 2005.

During the overlap, you wouldn’t see Pedro play any Headphones songs live, nor would you see Headphones perform any Pedro songs. A short time later, David decided to retire the PTL band name, part creative ways with co-conspirator TW, and resolve to put out his guitar-based songs under his own name. So as a solo live performer, he now pulls from a long list of whatever material he wants. In his own words from the stage: "It’s a Venn diagram that intersects right here with me."

He came to Cambridge a couple nights back to sing his songs of death and doubt in front of an obviously enraptured crowd at TT the Bears. I’m not sure I’ve ever missed any of his various incarnations’ Boston area appearances, and this one surely ranks with the best of them. Songs spread throughout his recorded history, along with all the songs from his newly released ‘Fewer Broken Parts’ EP (which conveniently appeared in my mailbox just hours before the show).

More on that disc after this gift, mp3s of David’s 17 song set (with bonus between-song banter), shared here with his kind permission…

David Bazan

Live at TT the Bears
Cambridge, MA
Monday, June 19th, 2006

01. April 6, 2039
02. The Poison
03. Priests and Paramedics
04. Fewer Broken Pieces
05. Of Minor Prophets and Their Prostitute Wives
06. Q&A #1
07. Selling Advertising
08. banter
09. Bands With Managers
10. Q&A #2
11. Hot Girls
12. I Do
13. Q&A #3
14. How I Remember
15. banter
16. Slow Car Crash
17. banter
18. Transcontinental
19. banter
20. Slow and Steady Wins the Race
21. banter
22. Backwoods Nation
23. Of Up and Coming Monarchs
24. banter
25. Cold Beer and Cigarettes
26. banter
27. The Longer I Lay Here

For those keeping score: Song 1 is from the PTL ‘Progress’ EP; 2, 9, 12, & 19 come from PTL’s ‘Achilles Heel’, and 3 can be found on their ‘Control’ disc; 4, 7, 14, 22, & 25 are all from the new solo EP; 11 & 16 are both Headphones songs, and 20 is from PTL’s ‘Winners Never Quit’; 5, 23, & 27 are all from ‘It’s Hard to Find a Friend’.

I think David’s been doing candid mid-show question & answer breaks for about as long as he’s been playing out, and depending on what the audience serves up for Q’s, the A’s can be worth the price of admission alone. Better some potentially interesting interaction than the cliché between-song cheeze you might get elsewhere (and if you’ve never seen Sense & Sensibility… spoiler alert!).

There’s a lot I dig about the guy: Aside from the obvious (his knack for catchy melody, his way with words, and that voice), I admire his ability to channel the darker aspects of humanity in his songs, his willingness to not only sing frankly about his faith but to question it (for which he has this agnostic’s respect), his politics, and his refreshing honesty, both within his lyrics and his conversation. He’s not afraid to wear more than just his heart on his sleeve.

Pay special attention to song #7 above, the Q&A that precedes it, and the words that follow it. It’s ‘Selling Advertising’, the first song on the new EP, and it’s pointedly directed at Pitchfork’s head hooer, Ryan Schreiber. As a longtime P-fork detractor, I’m glad to see Bazan put himself out there and mix it up with the so-called ‘indie tastemaker’. Back in 2000, there was a long string of infuriating reviews of records I loved (and even a couple I didn’t) that were so poorly written that they formed a lasting foundation for my disdain, which has since been diluted a bit by apathy. I still occasionally hit them up for news alone, but even that is becoming irrelevant; their daily updates increasingly include items I’ve read elsewhere much earlier. A friend pointed me to their recent review of the Billy Bragg box set, complete with misquoted lyrics and inaccurate song titles… so it seems not much has changed. It usually makes me feel dirty to even mention ‘em, but this deserves it.

Mr. Bazan’s beef: One of those hack reviews I mentioned was this one of Pedro’s ‘Winners Never Quit’ disc. A near-personal attack that talks little about the music, it’s a shining turd of an example of P-fork at it’s worst. And while it’s not written by Schreiber, word is he’s responsible for the random numbers that rate every reviewed release. Ever wonder why a write-up’s text occasionally doesn’t really jibe with the rating? Well, there ya go. More evidence of the douchebaggery: This swell PTL news item and another little review.

Have at thee, Schreiber! The lyrics to David Bazan’s ‘Selling Advertising’…
You’re so creative with your reviews
Of what other people do
How satisfying that must be for you
Am I a Christian? Are you a Jew?
Did you kill my Lord? Must I forgive you?

I know it’s hard to be original
In fact, nothing scares me more
Because Jesus only lets me do
What has been done before

The path of least resistance
The ancient holy wars
The same old easy targets
Yeah, we’ve all been there before

So if it starts to get you down
Just pretend
That you don’t make your living
From selling advertising
Tracking trends, corralling demographics,
And maximizing traffic

Then if you get tired of making taste for free
You can always start a band with me
Or anybody
As David himself says after the song, not exactly open to interpretation, eh? Gotta love the religion-teasing he throws out there. And how many points do you think P-fork will give the EP? It’s a catch-22: Too low and they’re taking the bait, too high and they’re attempting to cover their hipster asses (‘hey, look at us, we’re above that petty stuff!’). Can they resist the urge to get even muddier, and instead just ignore it?

To stream the entire ‘Fewer Moving Parts’ EP, which includes 10 songs (five new ones and their acoustic demo counterparts), head to PureVolume. You can also hear a few of them over at his MySpace page.

The title track (which Bazan called ‘the saddest song I know’) is a great one about his musical split with TW Walsh. ‘Backwoods Nation’ takes a look at the sorry side of the close-minded America we’ve seen over the last five years, and has been reworked nicely from a previous appearance on a 2002 Jade Tree compilation (that vocal distortion in the live version is a cool touch). Another song, ‘Cold Beer and Cigarettes’, lived a couple of previous lives as ‘The Devil Is Beating His Wife’, which you can find online as an acoustic demo (also on the EP) and an electric demo as well.

Forget about online availability, though — This EP is something you really need to hold in your hands… not just for the higher-fi, but for the beautiful drawings by Eisner-nominated artist/publisher Zak Sally (more than just the ‘ex-Low bassist’). The mini-comic-slash-lyric-booklet helps make the thing a genuine work of album art (if only it was an actual LP). Buy the whole pretty package either straight from the Undertow music collective or from Jade Tree, or at an upcoming show, where you can also score a larger version of the Zak Sally art in the form of a spiffy tour poster. The remaining dates…
Wed 06/21 Hoboken NJ @ Maxwell’s (early show)
Thu 06/22 Philadelphia PA @ World Cafe Live
Fri 06/23 Washington DC @ Black Cat Backstage
Sat 06/24 Pittsburgh PA @ Club Cafe Live
Sun 06/25 Newport KY @ Southgate House – Parlor
Wed 07/19 Portland OR @ Doug Fir – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Thu 07/20 Eugene OR @ WOW Hall – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Fri 07/21 Chico CA @ Market Cafe – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Sat 07/22 Modesto CA @ Xclamation Festival w/ Micah P. Hinson
Sun 07/23 Pomona CA @ Glass House – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Mon 07/24 San Diego CA @ The Casbah – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Tue 07/25 Los Angeles CA @ Tangiers – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Thu 07/27 San Francisco CA @ Bottom of the Hill – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Sat 07/29 Seattle WA @ Tractor Tavern – w/ Micah P. Hinson

Pedro The Lion roars no more.

It’s kinda old news at this point (and news that perhaps not that many people really care about), but Pedro The Lion is officially no more. Last night (June 15), leader (and, really, only member) David Bazan played a solo show at Schubas in Chicago, and he described the show as his first solo performance with PTL officially gone. So that’s something.

I’ve always been a fan, and I daresay that Bazan alone with an acoustic guitar was actually more exciting than the last few years of rocking in duo and trio formats — he’s chatty, funny, and not quite as dour as on the last tour. He’s not a fan of George W., and though often identified with Christian rock, doesn’t seem to hold any of the right-wing beliefs you might guess. In fact, at last night’s show, when someone asked him what he thought of marriage, Bazan said that he thought it was crazy that Christians get married just so they can fuck. (His word, used with flair and fluency, frequently throughout the show.)

The music, though, is still a downer, but mostly in a good way. He’s hawking a new EP called Fewer Moving Parts, and it includes songs that appear to question and embrace his recent band breakup ("Fewer Moving Parts"), vaginas ("Cold Beer And Cigarettes"), and the ridiculous futility of entertainment journalism ("Selling Advertising"). Thanks Dave! All are delivered with his signature heavy-hand, but they’re also pretty cutting and incredible, so we can forgive him — whether we’re Christian or not.

Anyway, last night was the first of his solo tour, and I recommend catching a show if he travels through your neck of the woods. Dates are at davidbazan.com…

The Lions Are Loose!

Fans grieved when Pedro the Lion retired earlier this year. Devotees of the David Bazan and Tim Walsh pairing should take heart to hear that the two are working on individual projects and both have solo work ready for some serious pre-break-up comparisons.

The new EP from Bazan is titled "Fewer Moving Parts" and was released this week on Jade Tree Records.

David speaks about the EP on his website:

The 10-song EP includes two different versions of five new Bazan songs. One version is stripped down acoustic and another version has full-instrumentation. "FEWER MOVING PARTS" is hands-down Bazan’s finest work to date.

Here’s a tracklisting:

Selling Advertising
How I Remember
Fewer Broken Pieces
Cold Beer and Cigarettes
Backwoods Nation
Selling Advertising (acoustic)
How I Remember (acoustic)
Fewer Broken Pieces (acoustic)
Cold Beer and Cigarettes (acoustic)
Backwoods Nation (acoustic)

Digital Test Driving of the EP is available on his myspace page.

David Bazan LPs are on the horizon for early 2007 release so make your new year’s resolution now to get more Bazan in your life.

David hits the road tonight in Chicago:

Thu 06/15 Chicago IL @ Schubas
Fri 06/16 Cleveland OH @ The Grog Shop
Sat 06/17 Toronto ON @ Music Gallery
Sun 06/18 Montreal QC @ Mile End Cultural Center
Mon 06/19 Cambridge MA @ T.T. the Bear’s
Tue 06/20 Brooklyn NY @ Southpaw (early show)
Wed 06/21 Hoboken NJ @ Maxwell’s (early show)
Thu 06/22 Philadelphia PA @ World Cafe Live
Fri 06/23 Washington DC @ Black Cat Backstage
Sat 06/24 Pittsburgh PA @ Club Cafe Live
Sun 06/25 Newport KY @ Southgate House – Parlor
Wed 07/19 Portland OR @ Doug Fir – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Thu 07/20 Eugene OR @ WOW Hall – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Fri 07/21 Chico CA @ Market Cafe – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Sat 07/22 Modesto CA @ Xclamation Festival w/ Micah P. Hinson
Sun 07/23 Pomona CA @ Glass House – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Mon 07/24 San Diego CA @ The Casbah – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Tue 07/25 Los Angeles CA @ Tangiers – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Thu 07/27 San Francisco CA @ Bottom of the Hill – w/ Micah P. Hinson
Sat 07/29 Seattle WA @ Tractor Tavern – w/ Micah P. Hinson

Tim Walsh is working solo under the moniker The Soft Drugs. This month saw a preview of his new song The Pitch. Other Soft Drugs maybe consumed at Tim’s myspace space. The new CD, "In Moderation," is available now.

Tracklist this:

01 The Pitch
02 Defending The Paint
03 Brand New Name
04 Don’t Sweat It
05 Broken Truces

In the Northwest? Come out in force for Tim:

Jun 22 2006, Tractor Tavern, Seattle
Jun 23 2006, Doug Fir, Portland, OR

Bazan Goes West

Known mostly for his tenure performing as Pedro the Lion, songwriter David Bazan recently retired the band moniker to continue making music under his own name. His debut EP "FEWER MOVING PARTS" finds the beloved Seattle songwriter [who was recently named #85 in Paste Magazine's Top 100 Living Songwriters] roaring back to his creative roots, performing and recording everything himself in his home studio, while still expanding his sonic canvas. His signature songwriting, voice, and melodies are framed in layered harmonies, multi-tracked guitars, analog keyboards, and intricate production he was never able to fully realize with Pedro The Lion. The 10-song EP includes two different versions of five new Bazan songs. One version is stripped down acoustic and another version has full-instrumentation. Acclaimed graphic novelist, Zak Sally created new original artwork for the EP. "FEWER MOVING PARTS" is hands-down Bazan’s {http://www.davidbazan.com} finest work to date.
In anticipation/celebration Bazan will take his act on the road. First hitting the east coast before heading west with recent Jade Tree signee, Micah P Hinson, in tow. Jade Tree will give the EP a digital release July 11th, as the year unfold Bazan will huddle up in his Seattle studio to begin work on his full length, due tentatively to be released in 2007.

Caught hook, line and sinker by David Bazan

usually don’t fall captive to pr company bait. The majority of the bands being hyped are being hyped `cause they need it or because they can pay. But the email I just got about David Bazan is an exception. For whatever reason Pedro The Lion was one of the few "indie bands" I could stomach. The list is short and includes Rilo Kiley, Mercury Rev, Yo La Tengo and Sonic Youth. Others have snuck in now and again but not often.

David Bazan has his solo ep, Fewer Moving Parts, coming out June 13 and from the first song released and the song titles of the others it seems like a brave record. "Backwoods Nation (Here We Go Again)" takes a swipe at rednecks, spin doctors and frat boys all within a powerful anti-war song. David’s on tour all summer both solo and with Undertow Orchestra (Mark Eitzel, Vic Chesnut and Will Johnson) which seems like our generation’s version of the Traveling Wilburys (except with a social conscience). Buy the new ep here now. Click here for tour dates

DAVID BAZAN "FEWER MOVING PARTS" DIGITAL DOWNLOAD (JT1121) COVER ART & TRACK LISTING


Warning: implode() [function.implode]: Invalid arguments passed in /home/jadetree/public_html/news/wp-content/plugins/extension-bbcode/Extension BBcode Bata.php on line 156

Known mostly for his tenure performing as PEDRO THE LION, songwriter DAVID BAZAN recently retired the band moniker to continue making music under his own name. His debut EP finds the beloved Seattle songwriter [who was recently named #85 in Paste Magazine's Top 100 Living Songwriters] roaring back to his creative roots, performing and recording everything himself in his home studio, while still expanding his sonic canvas. His signature songwriting, voice, and melodies are framed in layered harmonies, multi-tracked guitars, analog keyboards, and intricate production he was never able to fully realize with PEDRO THE LION. The 10-song EP includes two different versions of five new Bazan songs. One version is stripped down acoustic and another version has full-instrumentation. Acclaimed graphic novelist, Zak Sally created new original artwork for the EP.

Fewer Moving Parts is hands-down Bazan’s finest work to date. In anticipation / celebration Bazan will take his act on the road. First hitting the east coast before heading west with recent Jade Tree signee, MICAH P. HINSON, in tow. As the year unfolds Bazan will huddle up in his Seattle studio to begin work on his full length, due tentatively to be released in 2007.

Fewer Moving Parts CD EP is available for pre-order from and Jade Tree will release the digital download on July 11th through digital music services including iTunes and eMusic.

TRACK LISTING:

1. Selling Advertising
2. How I Remember
3. Fewer Broken Pieces
4. Cold Beer and Cigarettes
5. Backwoods Nation
6. Selling Advertising (Acoustic version)
7. How I Remember (Acoustic version)
8. Fewer Broken Pieces (Acoustic version)
9. Cold Beer and Cigarettes (Acoustic version)
10. Backwoods Nation (Acoustic version)

For the latest tour dates, see the .

DAVID BAZAN [I]FEWER MOVING PARTS[/I] REVIEW

When we heard earlier this year that Pedro the Lion were calling it quits we were sad to think that we were losing one of our favorite morbid songwriters. Never fear, though, as David Bazan is back with his first ever solo album, an EP rife with parentheticals called Fewer Moving Parts.

FMP will be released next Tuesday, and a Bazan tour kicks off two days later at Schubas. And if you’re worried that Dave’s lost his songwriting edge with the loss of Pedro chum T.W. Walsh, check the new song: (plus a bunch more on myspace)

Backwoods Nation (Here We Go Again) [mp3]