Analphabetapolothology

With only one full-length album to their name alongside a handful of singles and compilation tracks, CAP’N JAZZ left a longstanding impression and irrefutable influence on the region’s bohemian punk scene and unwittingly spawned a breeding ground for future scene stars such as the Promise Ring and Joan Of Arc. Analphabetapolothology (JT1036) compiles thirty-four songs that span the band’s entire history – six tracks of which are previously unreleased. Traces of their sonic fingerprint permeate hundreds of indie records released in their wake. This is why.

Tim Kinsella: Vocals
Victor Villareal: Guitar, Vocals
Davey vonBohlen: Guitar, Vocals on Disc 1
Sam Zurick: Bass
Mike Kinsella: Drums

Released January 1998

Tracks 1-12 originally released as “Burritos, inspiration point, card in the
spokes, automatic biographies, kites, kung fu, trophies, banana peels we’ve
slipped on and egg shells we’ve tippy toed over.” LP/CD on Mark Corley’s
Man With Gun Records. Recorded December 1994 by Casey Rice at Idful Music
Corporation. “Kitty, kitty cats” on Little League by Anja Westerweck.
Kevin J. Frank appears on the piano in Bluegrass. Track 6′s “I’m dying to
tell you I’m dying. I don’t need a reason” are Bob Nanna’s words. Refer to
Friction’s “Auburn” ca. 1994. FORGET WHO WE ARE. OLERUD. The last twp
songs ever written and polar opposites of each other. Written in the “C”
tuning now made infamous by the Promise Ring. Recorded live by Adam Jacob’s
Sonic Archives Mobile Recording Unit at the Fireside Bowl, July 7,
1995—their last show in Chicago. OOH DO I LOVE YOU. TAKE ON ME. TOKYO.
HEY MA . . . Except for Take on Me, none of these recordings were ever
considered finished or intended to be released. Take on Me was supposed to
be on some 80′s covers compilation which apparently never cane to fruition
and Hey Ma . . . Ended up on Matt Werth’s File 13 Records’ “We’ve Lost
Beauty” comp. It features Mike doing most of the singing while Tim
harmonica’d. Recorded March 1995 by Robroy Campbell and Kevin J. Frank on
Elliot Dicks’ old 8-track. Elliot then fixed up the sound a little in
August 1997, but there really wasn’t much he could do.

WE ARE SCIENTISTS! SEA TEA. TROUBLED BY INSECTS. Originally released as
“Sometimes if you stand further away from something, it does not seem as
big. Sometimes you can stand so close to something you can not tell what
you are looking at.” 7″ on Underdog Records. Recorded October 1993 by Neal
Jensen and Kevin J. at Old Plank. Kevin also played guitar noise on Sea
Tea. ROCKY ROCOCO. was recorded at the same time and originally released on
the “Nothing Dies With Blue Skies” split 7″ with Friction on Scott Snot’s
own Shakefork Records. All tracks include guest bass player Sudden Porthole.
Tracks 5-9 recorded by Neal Jensen at Old Plank, June 1993. IN THE CLEAR.
NO USE FOR . . . Originally released Pete Havernak’s Subfuse Records’ “How
the Midwest was Won” double 7″ comp. SORIA. Originally released on Basil
Shadid’s Further Beyond Records’ “Picking More Daises” double 7″ comp.
SCARY KIDS SCARING KIDS. Originally released on Shakefork Records’ “It’s a
Punk Thing” comp. BLUEGRASS. Originally released on Mark Pearsall’s Slave
Cut Records’ “Ghost Dance” double 7″ comp. Four different labels, one
medium sized suburb. WINTER WONDERLAND. Originally released on The Rocco
Empires’ “A Very Punk Christmas” comp. Recorded in time for Christmas 1993
by cousin Andrew J. Blake in his basement with the Kinsella mother on the
keys and a chorus of cousins. Ben Weasel called it “the proof that caP’n
Jazz is the crudiest and most pretentious band in Chicago.” THEME FROM
90210. Originally released on Icky’s Red Dawg Records’ “Punk TV” comp.
Recorded Spring 1995 in our parents’ basement on a 4-track, Mike playing all
the guitars and Tim the drum. AOK. GEHEIM. SERGIO VALENTE. EASY DRIVER.
Originally released as “Boys 16-18 Years . . . Age of Action” 7″ on Further
Beyond Records. Recorded March 1993 by Neal Jensen at Old Plank. Backing
vocals on Geheim by Kevin J. Backing vocals on Sergio Valente by Erik
Bocek, Keven J., Neal, Aaron Lipke, and Shane Mason. OOH DO I LOVE YOU.
Originally released on Braid’s Core for Care’s “Ooh Do I Love You,” double
CD comp. Recorded on our 4-track well after CaP’n Jazz broke up, Mike on
guitar and Tim singing = the Kink’d Rakes.

Compiled by Casey Rice at Dhanse Howll Qlazikx October 1997
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side, NJ
Layout by Jason Gnewikow
Live Photos by Shawn Scallen
Others by Kevin J, Jenny Tabor, Donna Kinsella, and the Band

1. Little League
2. Oh Messy Life
3. Puddle Splashers
4. Flashpoint:Catheter
5. In the Clear
6. Yes, I Am Talking To You
7. Basils Kite
8. Bluegrassish
9. Planet Shhh
10. The Sands Have Turned Purple
11. Precious
12. Que Suerte!
13. Take On Me
14. Tokyo
15. Ooh Do I Love You
16. Hey Ma, Do I Hafta Choke On These
17. Forget Who We Are
18. Olerud

1. We Are Scientists!
2. Sea Tea
3. Troubled By Insects
4. Rocky Rococo
5. In the Clear
6. Soria
7. No Use For A Piano Player When You Got A Player Piano
8. Scary Kids Scaring Kids
9. Bluegrass
10. Winter Wonderland
11. AOK
12. Geheim
13. Sergio Valente
14. Easy Driver
15. Theme to 90210
16. Ooh Do I love You

Vinyl Release Info:

Cap’n Jazz‘s seminal discography Analphabetapolothology, is now available on vinyl for the first time. Over a decade after the CD anthology release, Jade Tree is proud to give record the full-featured vinyl issue that it deserves. This double LP, cut from the original high resolution source masters and pressed at RTI, is packaged in a deluxe gatefold jacket with a full color, full size, 8 page booklet. The booklet features never before seen photos, fliers, and extensive liner notes by Tim Kinsella. The package also includes high quality MP3 downloads of all tracks and 10 additional songs from the original anthology.

 

SIDES A & B. Originally released as “Burritos, inspiration point, fork balloon sports. cards in the spokes, automatic biographies, kites, kung fu, trophies, banana peels we’ve slipped on and egg shells we’ve tippy toed over.” LP/CD on Mark Pearsall and Mike Corley’s Man With Gun Records. Recorded December 1994 by Casey Rice at
Idful Music Corporation. “Kitty, kitty cats” on Little League by Anja Westerweck. “I’m dying to tell you I’m dying. I don’t need a reason” on Yes, I Am Talking To You are Bob Nanna’s words. Refer to Friction’s “Auburn” ca. 1994. Kevin J. Frank appears on the piano in Bluegrass.

TAKE ON ME. TOKYO. OOH DO I LOVE YOU. HEY MA… except for Take on Me, none of these recordings were ever considered finished or intended to be released. Take on Me was supposed to be on some 80’s covers comp. which apparently never came to fruition and Hey Ma… ended up on Matt Werth’s File 13 Records’ “We’ve Lost Beauty” comp. It features Mike doing most of the singing while Tim harmonica’d. Recorded March 1995 by Rob Roy Campbell. Mixed by Elliot Dicks.

FORGET WHO WE ARE. OLERUD. The last two songs we ever wrote and polar opposites of each other. Written in the “C” tuning now made infamous by the Promise Ring. Recorded live by Aadam Jacob’s Sonic Archives Mobile Recording Unit at the Fireside Bowl, July 7, 1995 – our last show in Chicago.

WE ARE SCIENTISTS! SEA TEA. TROUBLED BY INSECTS. originally released as “Sometimes if you stand further away from something, it does not seem as big. Sometimes you can stand so close to something you can not tell what you are looking at.” 7” on Underdog Records. Recorded October 1993 by Neal Jensen and Kevin J. at Old Plank. Kevin also played guitar noise on Sea Tea. ROCKY ROCOCO. was recorded at the same time and originally released on the “Nothing Dies With Blue Skies” split 7” with Friction on Scott Snot’s own Shakefork Records. All 4 tracks include guest bass player Sudden Porthole.

AOK. SERGIO VALENTE. originally released on “Boys 16-18 Years . . . Age of Action” 7”
on Further Beyond Records. Recorded March 1993 by Neal Jensen at Old Plank. Backing vocals on Sergio Valente by Erik Bocek, Keven J., Neal, Aaron Lipke,
and Shane Mason.

This compilation was compiled by Casey Rice at Dhanse Howll Qlazikx, October 1997. It has been abridged for this vinyl edition. The accompanying digital download includes all songs from the 1998 CD release.

Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side Music, NJ and Paul Gold at Salt Mastering, NY.

All songs published by Frizzle Ma Dazzle (SESAC) / Jean-Pierre Leaud ca. 1965 Music (SESAC) / Music Songs Music (SESAC) / Toby the Cat Music (SESAC) / Tornado Country Music (SESAC) except “Take on Me” which was written by A-HA and published
by Sony/ATV Songs LLC OBO Samp-UK Ltd. Live photos on jacket except the trumpet photo are by Scallen. Others by Kevin J., Jenny Tabor, Donna Kinsella, the band and friends. LP design by Paul Koob, based on the original CD design by Jason Gnewikow at The Collection Agency.

Jade Tree: 2310 Kennwynn Rd Wilmington, DE 19810. jadetree.com
( C ) 2010 Jade Tree & ( P ) 1998 Jade Tree. JT1036

Side A:
1. Little League
2. Oh Messy Life
3. Puddle Splashers
4. Flashpoint: Catheter
5. In the Clear
6. Yes, I Am Talking To You
Side B:
1. Basils Kite
2. Bluegrassish
3. Planet Shhh
4. The Sands Have Turned Purple
5. Precious
6. Que Suerte!
Side C:
1. Take On Me
2. Tokyo
3. Ooh Do I Love You
4. Hey Ma, Do I Hafta Choke On These
5. Forget Who We Are
6. Olerud
Side D:
1. We Are Scientists!
2. Sea Tea
3. Troubled By Insects
4. Rocky Rococo
5. AOK
6. Sergio Valente
Bonus Songs Included with Download:
1. In the Clear
2. Soria
3. No Use For A Piano Player When You Got A Player Piano
4. Scary Kids Scaring Kids
5. Bluegrass
6. Winter Wonderland
7. Geheim
8. Easy Driver
9. Theme to 90210
10. Ooh Do I love You

 

Fun Fun Fun Fest Review: Cap’n Jazz

Fellow Chicago-native Thax Douglas emerged on the Orange Stage to introduce Cap’n Jazz with one of his dark, unique poems as the screamo five-piece took the stage. The excited crowd seemed as though they could have literally been waiting fifteen years for this performance as fans stretched through Waterloo Park. Of course this was a highly anticipated, epic reunion and a historical showcase that marked the final performance of Cap’n Jazz’s reunion tour.

Their set was heavy, spastic, and full of nostalgia. The crowd thrashed to their early ’90s favorites – the same songs that influenced generation of post-punk and emo rockers. Tim Kinsella alternated between belting out French horn solos and waving the brass piece over his head while passionately shouting before he eventually launched himself into the crowd to surf amongst fans above the mosh pit as enthusiasm ran rampant.

Knowing all good things must come to an end, Cap’n Jazz engaged their adoring fans in an bittersweet singalong of Aha’s “Take On Me” before they wrapped up their set and the crowd mixed and mingled for Man Man.

Fun Fun Fun Fest preview: Cap’n Jazz

6 p.m. Saturday, Orange stage

When influential Chicago emo rock band Cap’n Jazz — and that’s Pixies influential, mind you, short-hand for “influential and popular largely after the band could have actually used it” — ended its run for the second time, after a 1995 show in Little Rock, Ark., it did not end well.

Guitarist and vocalist Victor Villareal, battling a drug habit that would continue to dog him into the next decade, had taken a dangerous combination of pills. He was soon unresponsive, and the other four members of Cap’n Jazz rushed him to the emergency room. Ten hours later, Villareal was discharged, and Cap’n Jazz emerged a broken band.

“I wanted to keep it going on some level. But at the same time it was really obvious that it needed to end right there and be done. There was no question that it was going to happen eventually,” sighs Cap’n Jazz guitarist and sometimes-vocalist Davey von Bohlen, 35, from his home in Milwaukee, where today he works as accountant and fronts the band Maritime. “It was a really long drive back from Arkansas. Nobody was happy. There was no conversation. It was pretty silent, and pretty sad. As an ending, it was pretty emblematic of who we were then.”

But 15 years later — “a nice round number,” quips von Bohlen — Cap’n Jazz, the band of adolescent upstarts with a heart-on-their-sleeve sensibility who rocked basements and VFW halls all over suburban Chicago, have returned for a small run of reunion dates that will end with Saturday at Fun Fun Fun Fest. And it looks like that will be the end for Cap’n Jazz.

“This is it, and there’s no ?°»for now’ there. We didn’t plan to do more than one date, which turned into 13 or so, and if we kept going at some point we’d all just be in this band again and I don’t think, as much fun as it has been, any of us are really looking to do that,” says von Bohlen. “Every one of us is in other bands, and being in one band for a lot of us is just about all we can do at this point.”

The world looked very different when von Bohlen first joined Cap’n Jazz. Brothers Tim (vocals) and Mike Kinsella (drums and vocals) started the band in 1989 — at the ages of 15 and 12 — with Villareal and Sam Zurick (bass). As befits a group of adolescents, they played punk rock, but with a skewed sensibility — just as fast and emotive and intense, but more melodic, with a healthy amount of vulnerability on display. It was a style with origins in the Washington, D.C., punk scene — one often dubbed “emo” or “emo-core,” a term resented by nearly everyone involved.

Cap’n Jazz built a loyal regional following on their energetic live reputation and a series of 7-inches. But by 1993, the band had disbanded for the first time after Villareal made an unexpected move to California. Shortly thereafter, the Kinsella brothers began playing with von Bohlen, who found himself, initially reluctantly, incorporated into Cap’n Jazz as the band’s second guitarist after Villareal returned.

“I was in a band at the time called Ten Boy Summer, and Tim is as far as I can tell the only person that enjoyed it at all. He was at a few of our shows and we got to know him and we got to talking about how we should start a band, which is a totally teenage thing to do,” says von Bohlen. “So we started a new band up, which quickly became Cap’n Jazz again, and then I felt maybe a bit hoodwinked because I wanted to be in the other band.”

The band’s members went their separate ways one year after Von Bohlen joined, releasing only one album, a cumbersomely titled debut record that fans refer to as “Shmap’n Shmazz.” Tim Kinsella started the experimental rock project Joan of Arc while von Bohlen took center stage in cult-favorite emo band the Promise Ring.

But word on Cap’n Jazz kept spreading. A two-CD anthology of most of the band’s material, “Analphabetpolothology” found a steady audience that kept royalty checks flowing. And the band proved influential in Chicago and within the emo subgenre.

Even with Cap’n Jazz’s cult following — and the brief emergence of the Owls, a von Bohlen-less reunion of the band that produced one album in 2001 — von Bohlen’s hope for a reunion was dim. When Villareal cleaned up and von Bohlen got the call last year — the last member informed — he was surprised.

“I would have given it a zero percent chance of occurring,” says von Bohlen. “But it had been 15 years and by this point any lingering emotional antagonism was gone. And for the first time, really ever, everybody both had the time and was at a good point in their lives.”

And though the size and fervor of the reunion shows — several sold-out gigs in Chicago and large outdoor festival concerts — didn’t come as a huge surprise to von Bohlen, the return of Cap’n Jazz has at last put the band’s fans and its members on the same page.

“People have talked to us about Cap’n Jazz everywhere we’ve gone in music for the last 15 years, so it’s not like it’s a shock to see people interested in these shows,” says von Bohlen.

“But it’s been nice to play for big crowds, with a lot of young people in them, and to be able to touch and experience that legacy and have it driven home. We were so attached to Cap’n Jazz when nobody cared and so not attached to it when everybody cared, so it’s been nice to resolve that disconnect.”

Cap’n Jazz Reunion Coming to a Close with Two Shows Left


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After a Summer of reunion shows and , Cap’n Jazz is preparing to put a finish to the event. As much fun as it has been for everyone, the reunion was never meant to be permanent and all things must pass. Those who haven’t had the fortune to see the band the second time around have two remaining opportunities.

The band’s final Chicago appearance will be on October 9th at Riot Fest Chicago, where Cap’n Jazz will join Bad Religion, Cro-Mags, Naked Raygun, Zero Boys, Circle Jerks and a mob of other fracas inducing artists. Riot Fest Chicago happens October 6-10th. The site has the full line up, tickets and the full details.

The very last (and most fun of all) appearance of Cap’n Jazz will be at Austin’s on November 6th along with Devo, Suicidal Tendencies, Deerhunter, RJD2, Gwar, The Hold Steady, Mastodon, Best Coast, Wavves and about 100 others.

Final Cap’n Jazz Reunion Shows
October 9th @ The Metro (Riot Fest Chicago)
November 6th @ Waterloo Park (Fun Fun Fun Fest)

So there you have it. Two remaining reunion shows and the members of Cap’n Jazz will once again return to their 21st Century lives.

Now, for something a little more permanent, what’s better than vinyl?

Cap’n Jazz Analphabetapolothology Double LP

Order at and the

We are also pleased to offer a Cap’n Jazz T-shirt for the first time, available in three colors, with available.

LIVE REVIEW: Cap’n Jazz @ Bimbo’s 8/27

It’s been around 10 years since the seminal Chicago indie band Cap’n Jazz has rocked the stage, and while they may have been lost they were certainly not forgotten. This was particularly evident on Friday night when they took the stage at Bimbo’s in front of a packed house of fired-up fans. Despite only releasing one album in the mid ’90s, and breaking up shortly thereafter, the avant-garde, post-punk group had an unbridled influence on the indie rock scene. Based on the crowd reaction, you’d guess that they’d never left.

The crowd was buzzing from the get-go with young rockers talking about how excited they were to see the band for the first time and aging hipsters arguing about who’s been a fan longer. It was a diverse audience to say the least, but despite the age variance, one thing everyone had in common was a love for Cap’n Jazz. When they finally took the stage, it was as though they were still spunky teenagers dancing around the stage, jumping into the crowd, and whipping their fans into a frenzy. It was obvious that the band missed the thrill of performing. They joked with each other and played their songs with passion and energy.

Cap’n Jazz started promptly at 10:15PM. Maybe timeliness is something that comes with age, but we sure wouldn’t mind if today’s bands followed suit. Note to bands: It’s very much appreciated when you start on time. They proceeded to power through every song in their repertoire, which is less than extensive, but nonetheless epic. Lead singer Tim Kinsella took every opportunity to dive into the ravenous crowd as he shrieked his lyrics. The rest of the band looked like they wanted to join if only they weren’t brandishing corded instruments. In between each song there was plenty of banter, sometimes poignant, and sometimes rambling and incoherent, but always entertaining. It could have been the few reunion shows they’ve already played or the excitement of reforming something that was so vital to the music world, but Cap’n Jazz didn’t miss a step. No dust to shake off, no rusty hinges, just classic, raucous, emo, Cap’n Jazz. There was no need to reminisce because the good old days were alive and well at Bimbo’s that night.

It was a night of rejuvenation. The band appeared exhilarated while playing their entire one album catalog, and the crowd went nuts dancing, starting mosh pits, and crowd surfing, etc. Let me tell you, 30-year-old dudes crowd surfing is quite a site to see. It made everybody feel younger, and those still in their youth pictured their future in a much brighter light. Maybe they too can still rock out in 20 years.

Live Show Review: Cap’n Jazz at Bimbo’s, San Francisco

Cap’n Jazz
August 27th at Bimbo’s, San Francisco

When I walked up to Bimbo’s for the Cap’n Jazz show, I was pretty intimidated by the crowd of kids clad head to toe in ripped clothing and spiky accessories. I quietly stood out of place in line and waited for doors to open. It seemed only appropriate that the two underage guys ahead of me were talking about negative funds and Four Loko. Standing there, I started reminiscing about the days of teen angst and loving emo, a fitting prelude to the nostalgic experience of Cap’n Jazz’s reunion tour. Minutes later I snapped out of it to realize that I was holding half of the line up with my daydream.

Most of the attendees were dressed in grunge apparel and decorated in piercings that I didn’t think existed. The venue was filled with an under 21 crowd, which had me feeling more out of place than my sweater dress did. All of this was pretty comical, because Bimbo’s is a classy joint.

I watched some of Abe Vigoda’s set, which I found unremarkable, and after all was said and done, not a suitable opener for the night. My attention during their set came and went, so the only mental notes I could muster up were about ironic haircuts, graphic t-shirts, and how their untrimmed guitar strings were distracting. The crowd wasn’t moving much at all, which made me nervous for Cap’n Jazz. Abe Vigoda closed with a jazz outro of sorts, which I took as a cue to refill my drink. When I returned everyone was throwing elbows trying to get to the front of the crowd, and the room was filled to the brim with anticipation. The following act was about to blow everyone’s minds.

Cap’n Jazz has a short-lived, albeit very successful, discography, which includes one full-length album and a couple 7”s. This makes their fans easy to please because they are able to play every song they’ve recorded and then some at their shows. Frontman Tim Kinsella played the part of Midwestern charmer with his good looks and vintage attire. The remaining four members, including Tim’s brother on the drums, were working just as hard but seemed to lend the spotlight to the singer. As soon as they started playing “In the Clear”, it became obvious what this band is about and why everyone was willing to overdraw their bank accounts to see them on this reunion tour. Within the blink of an eye everyone on stage was sweating and playing their instruments like it would be their last time.

What followed was your typical emo or punk show. The band dove into the crowd and vice-versa. Skin was broken but only because everyone was trying to have a better time than the next guy. Every now and again I would hear a request for a Promise Ring or Joan of Arc song, none of which were fulfilled. It was clear that they had an agenda and were sticking to it. I felt the room go through an entire range of emotions. When things started getting rowdy and people began getting a little too out of control, the band would take it down a notch with a heavier song à la “Planet Shhh” or “Little League.” The night came full circle for me when they closed out the set with my favorite “Oh Messy Life” and finally “Puddle Splashers.” They closed out the night by covering “Take on Me”, and I felt alright with the fact that Tim Kinsella had to refer to a crumpled up piece of paper to follow the lyrics.

These guys lived up to their reputation and proved that they are the stand-up band that everyone has been whispering about for more than 10 years. I left smiling ear to ear, and decided to put my emo nostalgia in the freezer until the next time Cap’n Jazz comes around.

Cap’n Jazz in the New York Times, To Play Riot Fest Chicago

Cap’n Jazz has been added to Riot Fest Chicago and will share the stage with such acts as Bad Religion, Cro-Mags, Naked Raygun, Zero Boys, Circle Jerks and a plenty of Riot friendly artists.

Riot Fest Chicago happens October 6-10th.

The site has the full line up, tickets and the full details.

The weekend of July 23rd found Cap’n Jazz braving near 100º temperatures to play four packed shows on the East Coast. Aside from some last minute confusion due to a rain out in Brooklyn, all of the shows were a blast for everyone involved. See the links below for some press coverage of the shows.

Cap’n Jazz – July 24, 2010 at Starlight Ballroom, Philadelphia

In the liner notes of Cap’n Jazz’s 1998 anthology Analphabetapolothology, singer Tim Kinsella opined: “reissues?°¦undermine our pretenses by making what was once special and precious in its rarity, somehow a little less in its convenient availability.” To Kinsella, the reissue served as a means of “getting over and past it” in terms of his own personal involvement with the highly influential Chicago band.

Now, twelve years later (and fifteen since their disbandment), one wonders what inspired Kinsella to get past getting past it; Cap’n Jazz have reunited for a handful of shows on both coasts. Supported on the eastern shows by their hometown contemporaries Gauge — who called it quits in 1994 and reformed earlier this year — both bands are giving audiences (many of whom were in elementary school during their existence) a taste of what made the music of the Midwest so important in the early 90’s.

Saturday’s sold-out show at Philadelphia’s Starlight Ballroom was crowded, but not packed. The nearly-100 degree heat had clearly sucked some of the life out of the crowd, as Gauge opened the show with a blast of energy that seemed to fall on deaf ears. A pioneering act in the Midwestern post-hardcore/emo scene, Gauge’s off-kilter sound is more akin to that of Hoover, Current, or earlier Fugazi than emo stalwarts like Mineral or Braid (two bands that would list Gauge as influences). Despite a lukewarm reaction — little movement from the crowd and only scattered applause — the band’s unrestrained enthusiasm in playing together again was apparent from the get-go, with guitarist Kevin J. Frank nearly wrecking his equipment during their first song.

The energy the crowd had been saving up boiled over as Cap’n Jazz took the stage, and lasted throughout their hour-long set, consisting of tracks almost exclusively from their sole LP (or the first disc of Analphabetapolothology). Tim Kinsella — whose somewhat tuneless croons had always been a point of contention regarding the band — shrieked and howled his alliterative wordplay faithfully to the band’s recordings, despite having to use written lyric sheets for some of the stream-of-conscious ramblings of songs like “Tokyo.”

The real pleasure of the performance was in watching the band of 30-somethings regress into the primal, shirtless, “anything goes” urgency of the basement show era; guitarist Davey VonBohlen thrashing spasmodically between backup yells, Kinsella blaring away on a French horn, and his brother Mike somehow keeping it all locked together on the drums with rapid-fire precision. The sheer joyful chaos of it all culminated in the set’s penultimate song: “Ooh, Do I Love You.” The entire crowd screamed: “I’m singing / I’m hollering!” over and over with the band, as if to answer those who would question the necessity of it all with the explanation that there is no explanation. Nostalgia never sounded so good.

The Best Cap’n Jazz Cover Band Ever

Tim Kinsella on returning to the music he’s spent most of his career trying to shake.

He’ll never admit it, but Tim Kinsella helped invent what we now know (and deride) as emo in 1989, when he was all of 14. The basement band he started in Wheeling, Illinois, with his brother, drummer Mike Kinsella, and two friends—guitarist Victor Villareal and bassist Sam Zurick—was a flash of furiously inspired kid genius, too artful and poppy to be properly called postpunk, and he fronted it like a wriggling postpubescent shaman. Cap’n Jazz, as they called themselves after a couple quick name changes, didn’t last long—they split in 1995 after only one album—but they were succeeded by what became an entire genre of squeaky boys going apoplectic over muscular riffs. Over the years, bands influenced by Cap’n Jazz have become more and more mainstream, but Kinsella has stayed underground, making personal, obtuse, and political records in bands like Owls, Make Believe, and Joan of Arc—usually with other former members of Cap’n Jazz.

In January the late-period Cap’n Jazz lineup—with Davey Von Bohlen of the Promise Ring on second guitar—reunited for a four-song set at the Empty Bottle as part of the Joan of Arc Don’t Mind Control Variety Show. Rumors flew about a reunion tour, and they turned out to be true. This Saturday’s set at Wicker Park Fest will cap that tour, which began earlier this month and included two sold-out shows at Bottom Lounge during Pitchfork. It’s also the last local Cap’n Jazz show on the books till the fall, when the band convenes in Chicago for what Kinsella says will be its final gig.

How is being back in Cap’n Jazz?

Superweird.

How weird?

We’ve been playing together, practicing, for a while, so we’ve had plenty of time to get used to it. But, like, right now we’re in a trailer backstage [at the Jelly NYC Pool Party in Brooklyn] with Lightning Bolt and No Age, huge bands, and they’re opening for us, and it’s this giant production and so—it’s very strange. It’s very simple on our end still. But here it is, a sold-out show. Packed.

But it can’t be that strange—I mean, at every show you’ve played since the day Cap’n Jazz broke up, someone has probably yelled for a Cap’n Jazz song during the set.

A quarter of my income is Cap’n Jazz royalties, so I knew people were buying records. It’s weird to see who those people are and see them assembled somewhere. We played the Black Cat in D.C. and it was sold-out and the air-conditioning went out—it was insanely hot. We were just drenched. Everyone was. We played at a roller rink to 1,200 people, and today we’re playing outdoors in New York and it’s in the 90s. It’s just sweaty and insane.

It has to be a lot like the basement shows and Fireside shows that Cap’n Jazz played the first time around—it’s just like sweatiness on a different order of magnitude.

The amount of physical turmoil involved now, at this age . . . I feel like I have heartburn the entire time I’m onstage. It’s intense.

How’s it feel to be back in a punk band at 35?

[Laughs] I expected there to be an embarrassed feeling—and then there’s the stage diving, and I have no shirt on, which given the heat is my only option.

[/B]How are you finding the spotlight?[/B]

Having been in this band has enabled everything I’ve done since. Its popularity was abstract, because it was over before it ever started—it’s less weird now because it’s only 12 or 13 shows and that’s it. Over. That’s part of the excitement for people, I think, knowing the only time they will see it is now.

You’re someone who seems to have a total absence of nostalgia, creatively and as a fan—is it embarrassing on a certain level to be part of a hugely nostalgic thing?

Everything that ever happened exists again. I didn’t expect to be embarrassed by that part. The embarrassing part is singing my sincere high school poetry in public—but it’s not like I’m suddenly endorsing it. I’m able to do it because I am so different now that I’m no longer accountable for it. It’s like I’m singing the work of a guy who happened to have my same name. I am removed and can be very excited now.

Is there any particular thing you cringe at when you’re singing?

I no longer have that kind of attachment to it.

What you made at 16 has had an almost 20-year shelf life—are you flattered by being able to witness that?

Of course. How I summon energy is by watching how excited people in front are. I think I am more aware of trying to be a channel for that, more than projecting out. . . .

No one likes our other band, [Owls], and they know about it and the other bands I’ve done, but they don’t care—so in that there, in the excitement, there’s an element of negating everything I’ve done in the 16 years since.

Why did you get the band back together? Every other band you’ve ever had, you’ve had no problem breaking it up and reassembling it with different players. So I always thought this was something you’d never do—Cap’n Jazz in the classic lineup.

This is the first time it was really possible for all of us, in terms of schedule and willingness. There was so much distance from it, I felt OK.

Early to midperiod Joan of Arc was such a strong reaction to this, to your teenage time with Cap’n Jazz.

Yes, I wanted to do a different thing for me personally—I felt trapped by it.

Cap’n Jazz’s legacy is like a ghost in your career.

It’s weird to be a 35-year-old man saying "Cap’n Jazz" every day still. But it’s better than "Toe Jam," which was our original name; that’s the silliest part.

Our first semiserious bands when we’re young are the bands where we learn how to be in bands. What are the things you learned from Cap’n Jazz that you go back to when you’re in this exact group?

It’s incredibly shocking how similar it is to the first time around. How we all are—the idiosyncracies between us are very much consistent with 15 years ago.

Did that surprise you?

No, it’s just that you expect something like that, and when it’s exact—

Did you expect something different because Davey is an accountant now and not, like, a 12th grader?

[Laughs] A lot is exactly the same, and when it’s like that it’s actually really bizarre. Scary.

What are the bands that you care about that have reunited? Do you think there are good examples of how to do it?

If it wasn’t for the Bauhaus reunion, I wouldn’t be able to do this. This wouldn’t be happening.

Why?

They were my favorite band ever so it was my favorite night ever and made me realize it didn’t have to be, like, a hardcore band keeping it real for the kids or something like that. This—it feels like our first shows. We are new to all these people.

Playing to all these people in Philly, I asked if anyone there was at our last Philly show in December 1994—it was a show at Jon Hiltz’s house. And here we are now, with Jon Hiltz doing monitors for our sold-out show, and this kid in front yells, "I was three!" So these are people who are new to us.

Your Chicago crowds are probably people who all grew up seeing you, who can compare the old band and the new band—what are your audiences elsewhere like?

I have been hugged by sweaty bigger dudes more in the last week than ever in my life. A good amount of our audience is sweaty big guys.

So does this mean Owls are back together?

We are already, I guess, in a manner of speaking. [Laughs]

Is Cap’n Jazz a better band now?

We sound like the record, so it depends on what better is. We learned it as covers, these songs, from the album. We have a better sense of control and of our tones as adults, so in a way. . . . Maybe better was before—sloppy and out of tune and boundless energy. We can’t fake that. v

Cap’n Jazz at Williamsburg Waterfront, er, Brooklyn Bowl

It was hot at the beginning of Sunday’s Pool Party show at the Williamsburg Waterfront, very hot. Before I even got to the show, I’d soaked through my shirt.

The clouds over Manhattan looked dark and menacing as The Death Set sound checked. A woman announced that in the event of a thunderstorm, the show would be moved to Brooklyn Bowl and promptly start again. I was glad they’d made some sort of arrangement, I was going to be pissed if I missed Cap’n Jazz.

The Death Set was pretty forgettable. A couple of goofy young guys who wanted, badly, to sound like the punk tracks from Ill Communication. They didn’t quite cut it.

And then it started to rain. It was welcome at first; the temperature dropped a good ten degrees and made standing on the concrete manageable. But it rained harder and harder. The same woman who made the announcement earlier came out about halfway through The Death Set’s set and said the show was moving.

About a thousand people made their way the handful of blocks to Brooklyn Bowl in the rain. My girlfriend and I ended up way at the back of the line, near North 12th and Berry, about two blocks from the entrance. It was defeating. We tried to use the VIP passes I received for writing this article to get into Brooklyn Bowl, but the large, violent-looking bouncer said they were no good. Cops came out and said the show was packed to capacity; no one was getting in. The police broke up the line.

We gave up and headed to the bar. I whined about how Cap’n Jazz was one of those bands I’ve always wanted to see but never thought I could. Analphabetapolothology was my soundtrack nearly a decade ago. The band changed how I thought about music, as it did everyone who heard it, and between its members spawned a number of great acts. I’ve seen Joan of Arc a handful of times, I wish I could’ve seen The Promise Ring, I saw Make Believe once, and caught Owls when it toured and thought it would be the closest thing to seeing Cap’n Jazz. And now Cap’n Jazz was here, and I couldn’t get in.

Fuck it, I decided, let’s try again. We headed back to Brooklyn Bowl and walked up to the door right as a woman screamed, “Anyone with VIP or press passes can come in!” We were golden.

In all this time, over an hour, No Age, another band I was excited to see, had yet to begin. Once the band started, it didn’t disappoint. No Age was loud and driving, tight and professional. The vocals were a bit low, but it didn’t matter. The blend of noise pop and fast, hard rock was great live. The band slammed through its set, pretty much non-stop, for about 40 minutes. People were crowd surfing, cheering, and everyone seemed to be having a good time.

Brooklyn Bowl being packed to capacity was bullshit. It looked like there was room. I’m sure there are fire regulations and whatnot, but I only had to wait about two minutes for a beer, that’s how not packed it was. Jelly or Veoba or Chuck Schumer or whoever really need to put a better system in place for these things. Moving an outdoor show to a bowling alley won’t do.

Cap’n Jazz was amazing, no better word for it. Tim Kinsella’s stage presence was ridiculous and prickish in the best way possible. When people jumped on the stage to crowd surf, he’d push them before they were ready. He rolled on the crowd while he sang, grabbed the shoe off one guy as he floated past, held the French horn comically high above him when he played, and was just all around entertaining. Davey von Bohlen was also really into it. He thrashed on the guitar, rocked out with the drummer, and was having a blast.

The audience loved it too and knew every word. A high note was during “In the Clear” when Kinsella was supposed to scream the alphabet. He couldn’t seem to find his microphone in time and everyone picked up the slack, “A! B! C!” Kinsella shrugged.

“Oh Messy Life” and “Little League” were other high points to the show, the audience seemed to go most crazy for Cap’n Jazz’s only cover song, “Take On Me.” People danced and screamed the words, the same words Kinsella read from a paper as he sang.

While Cap’n Jazz’s sound is sloppy and spastic, it was actually really tight and professional. It’s nice to see that. So many bands today seem to be pristine pros or sloppy noise. Balance is hard to come by.

There was no encore from Cap’n Jazz as the band had another engagement to get to in New Jersey. Lightning Bolt was next, but really, the show ended when Cap’n Jazz walked off the stage. Lightning Bolt took a ridiculous amount of time to set up and it was really for nothing [unless you’re super into spazzy Rhode Island hardcore and this was what you had been waiting for all day—Ed.]. While the drummer/screamer/guy-who-wears-a-mask was good at drumming, Lightning Bolt sounded like any band you hear at a marathon hardcore show at the VFW. Unimpressive.

Overall the clusterfuck that was this week’s Pool Party turned out great. I feel bad for the hundreds of people that didn’t get into the show. It’s a damn shame to have missed a legendary band back together again.

Cap’n Jazz, Lightning Bolt, No Age & the DeathSet played Brooklyn Bowl/Williamsburg Waterfront (pics & video)


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photos by Leia Jospe
Cap’n Jazz @ Brooklyn Bowl….
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/capnjazz/poolparty/3.jpg
Sunday was an eventful day. TheDeathSet kicked off the ‘Pool Party’ at Williamsburg Waterfront in the afternoon, but was quickly told to stop due to rain. The organizers got on stage and announced that the free show was moving to Brooklyn Bowl, and the race was on. Those lucky enough to get to Brooklyn Bowl quick enough were let in before the show reached capacity, but thousands of others who had planned on seeing Lightning Bolt, No Age… and the only NYC appearance of the reunited Cap’n Jazz, were out of luck.

Luckily Cap’n Jazz was also playing that night at Maxwell’s in NJ, and No Age were playing Death By Audio, so a few more people got to see each of them (especially Cap’n Jazz) (though you had to decide between Cap’n Jazz and Universal Order of Armageddon).

Back to Brooklyn Bowl though…

"Cap’n Jazz was amazing, no better word for it. Tim Kinsella’s stage presence was ridiculous and prickish in the best way possible. When people jumped on the stage to crowd surf, he’d push them before they were ready. He rolled on the crowd while he sang, grabbed the shoe off one guy as he floated past, held the French horn comically high above him when he played, and was just all around entertaining. Davey von Bohlen was also really into it. He thrashed on the guitar, rocked out with the drummer, and was having a blast.

The audience loved it too and knew every word. A high note was during "In the Clear" when Kinsella was supposed to scream the alphabet. He couldn’t seem to find his microphone in time and everyone picked up the slack, "A! B! C!" Kinsella shrugged.

"Oh Messy Life" and "Little League" were other high points to the show, the audience seemed to go most crazy for Cap’n Jazz’s only cover song, "Take On Me." People danced and screamed the words, the same words Kinsella read from a paper as he sang." [NY Press]

Hopefully Cap’n Jazz announce more dates for those who missed them.

For No Age, this was the second year in a row that they played a Pool Party in Brooklyn Bowl due to rain,

More pictures and some Cap’n Jazz videos from Sunday’s show at Brooklyn Bowl (and Williamsburg Waterfront), below…

The Death Set @ Williamsburg Waterfront…
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/deathset/poolparty/1.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/deathset/poolparty/2.jpg
More photos available on article site
No Age @ Brooklyn Bowl…
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/noage/poolparty/3.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/noage/poolparty/6.jpg
More photos available on article site
Cap’n Jazz
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/capnjazz/poolparty/2.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/capnjazz/poolparty/4.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/capnjazz/poolparty/5.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/capnjazz/poolparty/6.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/capnjazz/poolparty/13.jpg
More photos available on article site
Lightning Bolt
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/lightningbolt/poolparty/1.jpg
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/img/music/lightningbolt/poolparty/2.jpg
More photos available on article site

A Band Reunites, Channeling Its Frantic Teenager Vibe

Before it was emo it was emocore, and before that, emotional hardcore. Somewhere in that initial compression came Cap’n Jazz, a band of relatively clean-cut Chicago teenagers making ragged music, hardcore molting its skin to let a little of the inner hurt peek through.

On Sunday evening at Brooklyn Bowl the band members returned, briefly, as reunited champions of a scene that hadn’t yet coalesced when it disbanded, after one album and several singles, in 1995.

Almost the entire catalog of Cap’n Jazz — the singer Tim Kinsella, his brother, the drummer Mike Kinsella, the guitarists Davey von Bohlen and Victor Villareal, and the bass player Sam Zurick — is collected on the compilation “Analphabetapolothology” (Jade Tree). It’s an intense, sometimes clunky listen, but the songs are charged. After the group split up, its members went on to more coherent and more popular bands — the brothers Kinsella and Mr. Zurick in Joan of Arc, Mr. von Bohlen in the Promise Ring.

Now nearly middle aged, they happily played the songs of agitated teenagers, mostly not bothering to clean up the attitude, or the sound. Tim Kinsella brought out his French horn early in the first song, “Basil’s Kite,” abusing it as usual. A minute or so later Mike Kinsella broke his snare drum. (The same thing happened at one of the band’s reunion shows in Chicago earlier this month, according to reports.) On the next song Tim leaned out into the crowd, lost the microphone to someone who took the opportunity to sing some of the lyrics, then pulled it back by its cord, eyebrow arched.

That level of amused chaos persisted through the riotous show, which was part of the Jelly NYC Pool Parties. Undone by rain at its original outdoor location in East River Park, it was hastily relocated to Brooklyn Bowl.

It was a purposeful mess, onstage and off. Tim Kinsella’s scraped singing is still a rush, even though his naïve delivery, as seen in YouTube clips of the band’s early years, has given way to wryness. Mr. von Bohlen is still a sparkplug, chipping in with howling vocals from time to time. Often, it seemed as if things might fall apart if not for Mike Kinsella, an authoritarian behind his drum kit.

The show was one of a dozen reunion shows the band has scheduled. (Sunday was a big day in Williamsburg for mid-’90s hardcore. Death By Audio hosted one of a handful of reunion shows of the Baltimore band Universal Order of Armageddon.) But this was not a slick affair. By the time the band played “Tokyo,” Tim Kinsella was reading off a lyric sheet, which he did throughout the rote, shouty cover of A-Ha’s “Take on Me” that used to be a band staple (though not as funny as the mopey “Theme to ?°»90210,’ ” which would have been a timelier, and more clever, choice).

For most of the night he had been fighting off a steady stream of fans making their way to the stage by riding the crowd, sometimes pushing them back into the mob and once singing for a bit while grabbing the ankle of an inverted crowd-surfer. He seemed to be having less fun than they were. Inhabiting your former self can be hard work.

After “Little League” he bopped a reveler on the head with his tambourine. “That wasn’t an act of aggression,” he insisted to the crowd, not quite convincingly. “That was an act of solidarity.”

Cap’n Jazz Heads East

The Cap’n Jazz reunion tour has begun. Last weekend, the band played two sold out shows at The Bottom Lounge in Chicago. Videos of the performance have been showing up in the usual places and a few links can be found below.

At the time of this posting, the men of Cap’n Jazz are in a van headed towards Washington, DC, where they will perform to a sold out crowd at The Black Cat on Friday night. While the following evening’s Philadelphia appearance is also sold out, anyone finding themselves without a ticket should head to the Williamsburg Waterfront on Sunday afternoon. Cap’n Jazz will be accompanied by No Age and Lightning Bolt for a .

[Express Night Out / The Washington Post]

Alternative Press Publishes an Oral History of Cap’n Jazz


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In anticipation of the upcoming reunion tour and of Analphabetapolothology, the June issue of magazine features an oral history of Cap’n Jazz. The feature includes interviews with the all band members, Bob Nanna (Braid), Mark Pearsal (Man With Gun Records), Tim McIlrath (Rise Against) and several others who surrounded the band since its inception in 1989. The interviews present the story of the formation, demise, and reunion of Cap’n Jazz from those who lived through it.

Pre-orders for the Analphabetapolothology Double LP are up in the Jade Tree store. The white vinyl is now sold out, but all pre-order customers will still be entered for a chance to win a test pressing copy of the LP.

Cap’n Jazz Analphabetapolothology Double LP
Release date: 6/29/2010

Pre-order at and the

Cap’n Jazz Reunion Tour

The Cap’n Jazz reunion tour has expanded to seven shows, including the recently added California performances. While many of the shows have sold out, there are still tickets left for several of the scheduled reunion dates. The tickets may not last long, so don’t wait.

July 10 Louisville, KY @ Forecastle Fest ()
July 17 Chicago, IL @ The Bottom Lounge (Sold Out)
July 18 Chicago, IL @ The Bottom Lounge (Sold Out)
July 23 Washington, DC @ The Black Cat ()
July 24 Philadelphia, PA @ Starlight Ballroom (Sold Out)
August 27 San Francisco, CA @ Bimbo’s 365 Club ()
August 28 Los Angeles, CA @ Echoplex ()

(Limited additional dates TBA)

Cap’n Jazz "Analphabetapolothology" Double LP & T-Shirts Available for Pre-order


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Cap’n Jazz’s seminal discography Analphabetapolothology, is now available on vinyl for the first time. Over a decade after the CD anthology release, Jade Tree is proud to give record the full-featured vinyl issue that it deserves. This double LP, cut from the original high resolution source masters and pressed at RTI, is packaged in a deluxe gatefold jacket with a full color, full size, 8 page booklet. The booklet features never before seen photos, fliers, and extensive liner notes by Tim Kinsella. The package also includes high quality MP3 downloads of all tracks and 10 additional songs from the original anthology. 300 on white vinyl will be available from Jade Tree only.

Pre-order Information

Cap’n Jazz Analphabetapolothology Double LP
Release date: 6/29/2010

Pre-order at and the

SOLD OUT

Pre-orders will ship before 6/29/2010.

Track Listing:

Side A:
1. Little League
2. Oh Messy Life
3. Puddle Splashers
4. Flashpoint: Catheter
5. In the Clear
6. Yes, I Am Talking To You

Side B:
1. Basils Kite
2. Bluegrassish
3. Planet Shhh
4. The Sands Have Turned Purple
5. Precious
6. Que Suerte!

Side C:
1. Take On Me
2. Tokyo
3. Ooh Do I Love You
4. Hey Ma, Do I Hafta Choke On These
5. Forget Who We Are
6. Olerud

Side D:
1. We Are Scientists!
2. Sea Tea
3. Troubled By Insects
4. Rocky Rococo
5. AOK
6. Sergio Valente

Bonus Songs Included with Download:
1. In the Clear
2. Soria
3. No Use For A Piano Player When You Got A Player Piano
4. Scary Kids Scaring Kids
5. Bluegrass
6. Winter Wonderland
7. Geheim
8. Easy Driver
9. Theme to 90210
10. Ooh Do I love You

We are also pleased to offer a Cap’n Jazz T-shirt for the first time, available in three colors, with available.

Cap’n Jazz Reunion Tour

The Cap’n Jazz reunion tour has expanded to seven shows, including the recently added California performances. While many of the shows have sold out, there are still tickets left for several of the scheduled reunion dates. The tickets may not last long, so don’t wait.

July 10 Louisville, KY @ Forecastle Fest ()
July 17 Chicago, IL @ The Bottom Lounge (Sold Out)
July 18 Chicago, IL @ The Bottom Lounge (Sold Out)
July 23 Washington, DC @ The Black Cat ()
July 24 Philadelphia, PA @ Starlight Ballroom (Sold Out)
August 27 San Francisco, CA @ Bimbo’s 365 Club ()
August 28 Los Angeles, CA @ Echoplex ()

(Limited additional dates TBA)

Two West Coast Dates Added to Cap’n Jazz Reunion

The latest update to the Cap’n Jazz reunion will be sure to please the West Coast fans. You haven’t been left out! San Francisco and Los Angeles are now on the agenda.

Cap’n Jazz

Friday, August 27, 2010
San Francisco @ Bimbo’s 365 Club
Tickets will be available here:

Saturday, August 28, 2010
Los Angeles @ Echoplex
Tickets will be available here:

Reunion Tour Schedule:

07/10 Louisville, KY Forecastle Fest / The Riverfront Belvedere ()
07/17 Chicago, IL Bottom Lounge (Sold Out)
07/18 Chicago, IL Bottom Lounge (Sold Out)
07/23 Washington DC The Black Cat ()
07/24 Philadelphia, PA Starlight Ballroom (Sold Out)
08/27 San Francisco, CA Bimbo’s 365 Club ()
08/28 Los Angeles, CA Echoplex ()

Cap’n Jazz Adds Forecastle Festival and Two East Coast Shows to Reunion

Couldn’t get tickets to the Chicago Cap’n Jazz reunion shows? Well, rest at ease, three shows have been added. Details below.

Cap’n Jazz
Friday, Jul 10, 2010
Forecastle Festival
Louisville, KY
Waterfront Park
All Ages

Tickets are available here:

Cap’n Jazz
Friday, Jul 23, 2010
Washington, DC
9:00 PM at The Black Cat
All Ages

Tickets are available here:

Cap’n Jazz
Saturday, Jul 24, 2010
Philadelphia, PA
9:00 PM at The Starlight Ballroom
All Ages

Tickets are available here:

Now, act fast!

Cap’n Jazz "Analphabetapolothology" Double LP, Live Shows To Come


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Jade Tree is thrilled to announce that one of our most influential and popular titles, Cap’n Jazz’s seminal discography Analphabetapolothology, will be released on vinyl for the very first time on June 15th. A little over ten years have passed since the original CD release and we are proud to give the record the proper full featured vinyl issue that it deserves. As Cap’n Jazz has grown in popularity, so has the demand for the anthology on vinyl and we are more than happy to combine our efforts to put together a package well worth the wait.

The Analphabetapolothology double LP will be packaged in a deluxe gatefold album jacket with plenty of bonus material not included with the original CD release, including never before seen photos, show fliers, and new liner notes by Tim Kinsella. Further details and pre-order info for the release are to be announced.

There is more. As you may have heard, Cap’n Jazz played a short surprise set in January. Well, the show went so well that the band has decided to reunite again, starting at the Bottom Lounge in Chicago on July 17th with select dates soon to follow. This is a one time reunion and this summer will be your one chance to see the band live, so don’t miss it. We’ll see you there!

Reunion show:
SOLD OUT 7/17/2010 Cap’n Jazz @ The Bottom Lounge, Chicago, IL

Cap’n Jazz Analphabetapolothology Double LP
Release date: 6/15/2010

Available now:

Track Listing:

1. Little League
2. Oh Messy Life
3. Puddle Splashers
4. Flashpoint: Catheter
5. In the Clear
6. Yes, I Am Talking To You
7. Basils Kite
8. Bluegrassish
9. Planet Shhh
10. The Sands Have Turned Purple
11. Precious
12. Que Suerte!
13. Take On Me
14. Tokyo
15. Ooh Do I Love You
16. Hey Ma, Do I Hafta Choke On These
17. Forget Who We Are
18. Olerud
19. We Are Scientists!
20. Sea Tea
21. Troubled By Insects
22. Rocky Rococo
23. AOK
24. Sergio Valente

Bonus Downloads:

25. In the Clear
26. Soria
27. No Use For A Piano Player When You Got A Player Piano
28. Scary Kids Scaring Kids
29. Bluegrass
30. Winter Wonderland
31. Geheim
32. Easy Driver
33. Theme to 90210
34. Ooh Do I love You

Cap’n Jazz Played Chicago Last Night


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Last night, some of you may have been lucky enough to be in Chicago, at The Empty Bottle to see a "Local Cover Band" otherwise known as Cap’n Jazz.

Set list:
Little League
Oh Messy Life
We Are Scientists
Que Suerte

http://media.jadetree.com/images/capnjazzreunion.jpg

Photo by Craig Shimala

chicagocore: aKinsellapolothology

It’s the late 1980s and early ?°»90s, and a group of high schoolers are crafting a style of post-punk that has little to do with anything else going on at the time. In hindsight, they’re looked at as proto-emo and post-hardcore visionaries, but back when Cap’n Jazz was playing to sparsely packed clubs in the region, the scene wasn’t nearly as welcoming.
In the post-Cap’n Jazz era, brothers Tim and Mike Kinsella have done anything but conform. Between the two of them, they’ve been in revered (and sometimes loathed) bands including Joan of Arc, American Football, Sky Corvair, Owls, Owen, Friend/Enemy, and Make Believe.

When the brothers write together, their sound doesn’t quite blur the line between melodicism and noise, instead, it collides the two together. And rather than being some calculated maneuver, it’s an art cultivated at the visceral level, playing out as a balance between the two. Where Mike provides a sense of rhythm and prettiness, Tim takes down the veil of how instruments and songs “should sound,” and revisions their roles entirely. And if you think it’s nothing but chaos, then you’ve entirely missed the point.

The Kinsella brothers join Chicago Public Radio’s Joe DeCeault for this month’s documentation of the local scene: chicagocore. Listen in for an in-depth look at these incredibly prolific and often misunderstood artists.

Cap’n Jazz [I]Analphabetapolothology[/I] Review

I was surprised searching through the review archives that punknews.org did not have a review of Cap’n Jazz on record. Even though their discography came out in 1998, Cap’n Jazz, being one of the most influential indie/noise emo bands that has ever existed, should been written on if only to introduce new listeners to the roots. Cap’n Jazz essentially consisted of the current Owls lineup plus Davey VonBohlen later of Promise Ring fame. Members would later participate in bands such as Joan of Arc, American Football, Owen and Sky Corvair.

Back to the sound. Cap’n Jazz dominated the Chicago indie scene of the early nineties with Tim Kinsella’s little kid voice, confusing word play, and rambling storytelling lyrics. Guitar and bass work was at times complex but often sounded sloppy on purpose, a rushed sense of urgency is conveyed to the listener. Drum work by Mike Kinsella keeps the chaos together and restrains the vocals and guitars from a life of their own. Cap’n Jazz as a whole is a sound that could never be replicated to the same success even later by 4 of the members together in the Owls. This sound at first seems inaccessible and to broad to enjoy but after a few listens anyone will begin to feel pumped up by rockin tracks like Oh Messy Life.

The most interesting aspect of Cap’n Jazz is probably Tim Kinsella’s word play. Few songs have obvious logic or themes to them. Many include various plays on word aspects such as the rambling Flashpoint: Catheter’s "I know you know traps ease. I know no trapeze." Some songs tell stories that seem to have no points and seem almost improvised except for how well they flow with the music. Kinsella’s childish voice and occasional cracking screams add to the chaotic tenement of the band.

Back to the actual album. Jade Tree compiled one of the most satisfying and complete discography that has ever existed. The 2 cd set contains not only every song written by the band including unreleased demos but also a selection of songs from their final live performance and three covers of varying quality.

The first cd is much more listen able than the second and the first 12 tracks compromise the only full length release of the band’s career. Little League, Oh Messy Life, Basil’s Kite, and In The Clear will remain four of my favorite songs of all time. The whole compilation is worth these twelve tracks alone. In fact the whole emo genre of today is barely worth these 12 tracks alone. The first cd ends with 3 unreleased songs and two live tracks taken from their final show at the Fireside Bowl. These final tracks include a rockin cover of A-Ha’s Take On Me and Tokyo a song that comes across almost as a spoken word session by Tim Kinsella.

The second cd of the set includes a large collection of songs off collections and split cds many not including all members of the group. This set is hard to listen to and doesn’t flow well but is a treasure for collectors and any true fans. It includes strange variations on covers of 90210 and Winter Wonderland. Still this second cd contains some gems of pure Cap’n Jazz genius. Highlights include songs such as AOK, Rocky Rococo and Ooh Do I Love You.

Jade Tree should be mentioned for their quality good work in the collection of information and songs. The cd cover contains an opening from the band concerning their time together. Also complete lyrics and explanation of original releases of the songs are included alongside interesting cover art.

This album should belong to any fan of indie rock, emo, noise rock, punk rock, hell and independent music fan ought to at least listen to Cap’n Jazz. It is defiantly one of my top 5 albums of all time if not my favorite album ever released.