Charmer

Produced by Kurt Ballou (Isis, Cave In, Give Up the Ghost, Converge), Charmer (JT1098) takes off in many ways where their Only In Morning EP left off, that is to say in throws of total madness, the end result is an absolute force to reckon with; equally vicious, progressive and thoroughly unpredictable. The band, made up of current Black Cross and one time National Acrobat member Evan Patterson on guitar, along with bassist Nick Thieneman, drummer Geoff Paton, and vocalist Steve Sindoni, deliver an explosive and volatile vision – scathing, brutal, and biting BREATHER RESIST are simply too explosive to ignore. Vinyl is also available from

Steve Sindoni, vocals. Nick Thieneman, bass/vocals. Evan Patterson, guitar/vocals. Geoff Paton, drums.
Chris Owens sings a little on “Honest to God”
Ryan Patterson sings a little on “A Social Worker’s Nightmare”
Maximum Louisville back-ups on “Long Nights, Short Fuses” Includes Brent, Cory, Derek, Chris, Pat, Stan, Ryan, Matt, Keith, Craig, and Honk.
Trombone on “As Far As Goodbyes Go” by David Hume
Intro to “Keep ‘em In Stitches” by Joel Stallings/Avorza
Evan played the acoustic, the piano, and whistled.
Nick played the univox mini-korg.
Produced, engineered, mixed by Kurt Ballou.
Assistant engineer Brian Haulter.
Recorded and mixed May 16-23 on the 4th year of the 2nd millennium at Downtown Studios Louisville, KY.
Mixed again June 2-3 at God City, Salem, MA.
Mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side Tenafly, NJ.

1. An Insomniac’s Complexion
2. A Social Worker’s Nightmare
3. Midas In Reverse
4. Honest To God
5. As Far As Goodbyes Go
6. Keep ’Em In Stitches
7. Long Nights, Short Fuses
8. Loose Lipped Error
9. A Passing Glance
10. Amphetamine Praise
11. Astigmatism

SAD NEWS FROM THE BLUEGRASS STATE

We’ll let Evan speak for himself…

12/14/05

As of last Thursday, we have parted ways with our singer, Steve. He will not be replaced and we are not going to be playing any songs from our past records. Most of the lyrics are written from his perspective and it would insulting to ever attempt to play those songs without him.

We do have nine new songs and are in the process of writing more. Hopefully, we will release a new full-length in late summer early fall 2006. Nick and I are going to take over the vocal duties. Obviously this is a huge change and it is going to take some time to recover.

Steve has told me that he will be doing a new band with some friends in town. They start practicing next month and I am honestly looking forward to hearing it.

Things are going to be strange for all of us for a while and we could all use your support.

-Evan/Breather Resist

BREATHER RESIST LIMITED 7" NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE


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While BREATHER RESIST finish pounding the East Coast with tour mates Red Sparowes and Zombi, don’t feel left out if you missed them live. The newest notch in Louisville’s musical belt, the three song 7” Full Of Tongues is now available for purchase online at . Released earlier this month by , Full Of Tongues is the band’s first recording since the release of their debut full length, (JT1098) in October of last year. The vinyl is limited to 800 red / 200 green and has silk-screened packaging that must be seen to be believed.

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BREATHER RESIST TO TOUR WITH PELICAN AND RED SPARROWES

BREATHER RESIST will be dominating the States again for the better part of this August with two of the hottest bands out there on the instru-metal scene. First the band will be out supporting Pelican, whose amazing new album, The Fire in Our Throats Will Beckon the Thaw, just dropped. Then the boys will be headlining their own string of shows with Red Sparrowes, which features members of Isis, Neurosis and Angel Hair. Also along for the ride on some shows will be Big Business (ex-Murder City Devils and Karp) and doom-prog-rockers Zombi. If you still don’t own BREATHER RESIST’s Charmer (JT1098), come get converted at the hand of the band’s explosive live show.

MP3:

Please consult the Breather Resist for all of the dates and specifics.

BREATHER RESIST JOIN A CULT

BREATHER RESIST, whose Charmer (JT1098) is still breaking hearts and starting fights, are just off their Maximum Louisville tour and are now looking to hit the road again. This time with brutal avant-masters Melt Banana for the tail end of April and then headed out with the daring Swedish 7-piece Cult Of Luna for much of May. Bring the noise!


Please consult the Breather Resist for current dates.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Breather Resist hail from Louisville, Kentucky, and can be compared to Botch, Converge, Deadguy and Kiss It Goodbye. Yes, here we have some pretty chaotic, almost unremitting hardcore goodness. Guitars provide occasional melody, a small dose of technicality and lots of noise. The drums and bass form a tight rhythm section, the former negotiating time changes with ease, the latter providing unstoppable momentum. Above this larynx shredding-screeches, and occasionally more emo orientated recitations are highly effective. Charmer bleeds aggression, loathing and antipathy towards?°¦ well, a lot of stuff; this band is fucked off. Moments of melody are welcome, and the expect discords are also effective. Occasional quieter interludes provide some respite, but this is always short-lived.

Breather Resist don’t play metal, yet Charmer still pummels the listener into submission very effectively. For open minded metalheads this is well worth checking out, because anyone that says it’s not heavy is lying – it is heavy, and if you like metal, you may well like this. Recommended for hardcore and math fans.

7/10

BREATHER RESIST CHARM THE WORLD

The Kentucky boys of BREATHER RESIST have just finished unwinding from their whirlwind stateside touring schedule in support of their Jade Tree debut Charmer (JT1098). Barely in the front door they are already going back out to give the rest of the world a taste of their brutal squelch. A full month is planned starting in Belgium and coming to a halt many days later in Luxembourg. Hands down BREATHER RESIST deliver the single heaviest punch to the groin set you’ve ever seen, so don’t miss these shows!

And if you don’t believe us be sure to check the band’s to see what other folks have been saying…


Please consult the Breather Resist for current dates.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

OUR RATING – 8 /10

I’ve been beaten and dragged. Before I go any further, let me make it clear that I didn’t ask to be hit in my face and chest and then pulled through the streets by a rusty ox-cart. It just happened. Breather Resist’s newest effort, Charmer, arrived in my mail.

Deadguy meets Karp meets Kurt Ballou. Aggressive, heavy, and groove-laden. Bass that keeps the song firmly on-track while the guitar fights someone or something. Maybe I’m not built for this because I cover my ears during movie gunfights and this record is like falling into a war zone. Often the instruments are tripping over themselves to see who can hit you first. Everyone is in attack-mode. Doubtlessly, many listeners are into that. But to this reviewer, Breather Resist are actually at their best when embracing their less-pummeling side. There are only so many punches you can take before they all feel the same.

I believe they swiped their moniker from the Hoover song of the same name, and it feels like that isn’t the only homage paid to that DC band and their contemporaries. The less brutal songwriting on this album is obviously informed by post-punk and 90′s emo. Heroin and Drive Like Jehu are clawing just below the surface of this album, waiting to be freed from the prison-riot happening around them. It’s those voices from the grave that make this album worth the occasional redundancies that generally can’t be helped when making a record this heavy.

The lyrics are as confrontational and aggressive as the music, but not particularly insightful or relatable to this reviewer. The album artwork is easily the best I’ve seen this year and probably deserves its own review in a trade magazine for design. The production work is masterful and manages teeth-rattling heaviness while treating each instrument with care.

Bottom Line: The tasteless will gravitate to this record because it is genuinely heavy, and that’s all they care about. However, hardcore punk fans with refined palates will embrace this record for what it is: an honor-student with brass knuckles. As a matter of taste, I could’ve used even more finesse and less beating with a shovel, but even I can’t deny that this is the highest-quality shovel beating around. It may not be my record-of-the-year but I guarantee it’s the album some people have been waiting all year for.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

First, allow me to get this out of the way: Jesus Lizard Jesus Lizard Jesus Lizard. As enjoyable and righteously fierce as Breather Resist are, they start and end with the Jesus Lizard. Caveat listener– if you’re uncomfortable with a group proudly wearing a seminal predecessor’s influence on their sleeve, then Alt-Tab yourself out of this browser window and give your (hopefully) well-worn copies of Liar and Goat and Bang another go-around. On the other hand, if you’re game to hear a group gamely reinvent the Judas Cradle, then you could do worse than to give these kids a chance.

So, yeah, it’s pretty clear guitarist Evan Patterson holds Duane Denison in high regard. The way Patterson’s winding, nauseous leads (cf. his careening string-bending in "Amphetamine Praise") slither around the shredded hoarse vocals and careen off of the stiff yet febrile rhythm section, one can’t help but notice the similarities. Not that this is a bad thing– Patterson should take pride in being able to both crunch numbers (as in the gear-shifting "Honest to God") and perform simple math (such as the spacious noodling introducing "Loose Lipped Error") with such violent grace.

Charmer takes little time to get up to speed. The introductory track, "An Insomniac’s Complexion", opens with three quick hits, pauses for a moment atop a bed of squealing feedback, and then begins thrashing. The group can squeeze five minutes’ worth of song into 120 seconds ("A Passing Glance"), stretch their hyper kinetic pummeling out to comfortably fit a six-minute frame ("Amphetamine Praise"), and switch seamlessly between pensive throbbing and full-on fury without breaking stride. (Take your pick from any of the 11 tracks; I’ll stand behind the aforementioned opener.)

Though the sturm and drang the group regularly summons doesn’t fail to impress, the quieter moments sprinkled sparingly throughout– the guitar/trumpet duet that introduces "As Far as Goodbyes Go", the two minutes of relative quiet at the start of "Loose Lipped Error" slowly ratcheting the level of tension, and the scream at the end of the CD that morphs into what sounds like a sped-up bagpipe track digitally castrated– might be more impressive. It’s easy to just hit the one note and hold it; it takes skill and confidence to try different tacts, and it’s a whole different proposition to try these sorts of changes at the speeds Breather Resist achieve.

And, lest we forget, while the band grinds their way through these taut catharses, there’s vocalist Steven Sindoni riding the wave and doing his best to splay his vocal chords through volume and will. If you can actually make out any words he’s screaming, then kudos to you– it’s not as if Sindoni offers any help. The few moments of vocal clarity I found were quickly subsumed and subdued. Granted, in the wake of a glorious racket such as the stuff Breather Resist concoct, it’s more important to get across to the listener the unfettered aggression and fury of the music as a whole than to be implicitly understood. Breather Resist send that message out loud and clear. And I do mean loud.
7.4

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Breather Resist seem to be journey men with releasing albums. They have put out EP’s and LP’s on various labels for the past 2 years. They have released music on Initial, Deathwish, Magic Bullet, Nova, Level Plane and now Jade Tree. Their newest effort, "Charmer", is a statement for the "metalcore" scene. It’s original and just plain good. It’s reminiscent of Coalesce and at times Dillenger Escape Plan. Breather Resist features Evan Patterson of Black Cross/National Acrobat.

"Charmer" is bass filled and gritty but at the same time it’s very melodic. It’s not quite as good as Coalesce but at least there isn’t some guy singing in a whiney high pitched voice trying to harmonize with the rest of the music. "Charmer" is a great album and another positive notch in Jade Tree’s belt.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

This is an incredible time in music. Instead of bands trying to show their influence from one band, music has now become a challenge to see who can mix different styles together in a way that no one has before. Enter Breather Resist. The reason I like this album so much is because of their obvious liking for The Jesus Lizard. In my opinion, The Jesus Lizard was on of the best bands to ever come out, but they have never received the credit, and attention, they disserved. It’s great when a band, such as Breather Resist, shows that The Jesus Lizard has not gone unnoticed. Of course, though, there are other styles on this album, but it all is run through the noise barrier that was established by The Jesus Lizard.

Breather Resist, from Louisville, KY, has already released an EP on Deathwish Inc., as well as several splits and seven inches, but "Charmer" is their debut full length. There are some really interesting things happening on "Charmer". First off, Breather Resist changes from chaotic Converge style parts into the sonic grooves of The Jesus Lizard so flawlessly that it shows just how connected the two styles are. Second, they make such seamless, but difficult, time changes that it takes a second for it to sink in that it just happened. Add in the few little noise breaks and effects, and "Charmer" ends up being a great album that pays tribute to the forefathers and lets them know that the next generation is here to carry the torch.

Key Tracks: "As Far As Goodbyes Go," "Loose Lipped Error"

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Hailing from the ever-thriving Louisville hardcore scene, come Breather Resist, an audio assault that will pummel even the hardest of heavy music connoisseurs. If you were left feeling somewhat empty handed by the latest offering from Converge, then this might just be the record to give you the pick me up you’re so desperately looking for. Produced by Kurt Ballou (Converge) and showcasing members from other notable Louisville acts such as The National Acrobat and Black Cross, Breather Resist deliver a debut full length that will capture you with darkly introspective lyrics, throbbing distorted bass and violently discordant guitars. The rhythms are unique without being too tech, and overall every element compliments another in this brash mess of distortion. The layout is exceptionally original and the recording crystal clear, without sounding over produced. If more bands were as sincere and unrelenting as this, the “underground” would have less to be ashamed of. This is a band that will not leave you for bigger and brighter things. The BR boys are real people making real music.
9 out of 10

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Breather Resist always seems to impress me. Their last record, “Only in the Morning”, definitely set-up where “Charmer” now takes a listener. Without losing a drop of aggressiveness, their debut Jade Tree release brings about a certain lost structural element that inherently thrusts emotion onto a listener. This Kentucky foursome also pays homage to their region with a use of heavily chaotic, yet still translatable, southern guitar licks (ala: parts of “A Social Worker’s Nightmare”). While some people feel that this genre of rock’n’roll, chaotic hardcore is slowly being diluted by the number of scene-point seeking teens picking up instruments, Breather Resist still holds strong as a contender. “Charmer” plays out like a climax to some brawl that was started over something as simple as a sweater or some cheese. Listen for yourself kids! You’ll be able to steal ideas left and right!

Side-note: Possibly some of the best artwork I have seen in recent years; congratulations to their artist choice ?°¦ extremely talented.

Breather Resist

Can’t take one more moment of election post-mortem? Try this simple diversion. Pull out your favorite Dillinger Escape Plan, Jesus Lizard and Entombed CDs and carefully break them into tiny shards. Chew and swallow. Then start singing some of those dark, self-loathing lyrics you’ve been working on during commercials. The result will sound something like Breather Resist, Louisville, Kentucky’s relentlessly brutal hardcore punks. While the violent bobbing, weaving and lunging of guitarist Evan Patterson, bassist Nick Thieneman and drummer Geoff Paton sounds like Pavement’s lost black-metal album, Steve Sindoni’s larynx-shredding vocals obscure surprisingly sensitive and introspective lyrics. Ferocious, unsettling and uncompromising, Breather Resist rises like smoke from the Ohio River to breathe life — and death — into a numb and complacent world. Go see this band. You’ll feel better.

Breather Resist Saturday, November 13, the Construct, 303-292-2234.

Can’t take one more moment of election post-mortem? Try this simple diversion. Pull out your favorite Dillinger Escape Plan, Jesus Lizard and Entombed CDs and carefully break them into tiny shards. Chew and swallow. Then start singing some of those dark, self-loathing lyrics you’ve been working on during commercials. The result will sound something like Breather Resist, Louisville, Kentucky’s relentlessly brutal hardcore punks. While the violent bobbing, weaving and lunging of guitarist Evan Patterson, bassist Nick Thieneman and drummer Geoff Paton sounds like Pavement’s lost black-metal album, Steve Sindoni’s larynx-shredding vocals obscure surprisingly sensitive and introspective lyrics. Ferocious, unsettling and uncompromising, Breather Resist rises like smoke from the Ohio River to breathe life — and death — into a numb and complacent world. Go see this band. You’ll feel better.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

In 2002 a project unlike none other took form. Louisville, Kentucky was the first to be ravaged by this dynamic quartet; the world is next.

Engulfing you in a plethora of brutal screams and face to the floor chaos, Breather Resist release unto you "Charmer", their much due full length on their newly signed label; Jade Tree. Almost instantaneously taking off where "Only in the Morning" left off, Breather Resist is quick to introduce those of you who haven’t been acquainted just yet.

Laying things out quicker than a bad drug deal about to go down you find yourself wrapped around Steven Sindoni’s pulverizing vocals and emanating, full out guitars in An Insomniac’s Complexion. Taking nothing for granted, the onslaught of mayhem only ensues further as your torn a new one with both A Social Worker’s Nightmare and Midas In Reverse. Over the course of the next few tracks Breather Resist implement a style few and far between, not only that but they, unlike many bands challenge the genre with such tracks as As Far As Goodbyes that consist of a lulling introduction and a cut-throat dive into a chaotic meltdown of furious guitars and fierce screams. The nebulous lull returns again in Loose Lipped Error where the band portray another creative side with a mixture of harsh bass lines and elaborate drumming, Kurt Ballou’s flair for producing is quite evident in this track.

Wrapping things up with Amphetamine Praise and Astigmatism, Breather Resist leave you basking in the hopes that their next album progresses only farther than apparent in Charmer. Aside from a few flourishing, but less than genre challenging songs, Charmer leaves you in the wake that maybe; just maybe the "noisecore" genre will take a step in the right direction.

Evan From Breather Resist

I was disappointed in early September, when I found out that a Breather Resist show was cancelled in Worcester. To my luck, they played Providence in October, but back surgery recovery kept me from it. James went to do the interview, but Evan’s cell phone was shot, meaning that he couldn’t contact him. James was a dollar short to get into the show, so he went home. Breather Resist is a great live band with a great new album, Charmer, and I give props to David at Jade Tree for sending the interview to Evan, and to Evan for replying so quickly with some really great answers..

1. Introduce yourself…

My name is Evan and I play guitar in Breather Resist.

2. Why is Jade Tree a good choice for you guys?

Jade Tree is a good choice for any band. I think maybe you should ask them why Breather is a good choice for the label. HAHA! Seriously, they have always been One of the best independent record labels. Now that we are actually friends with Everyone who helps run things and the bands. We really feel like we are a part of family. They understand what we are trying to do musically, lyrically, and Everything else in between.

3. How is Jade Tree different from Deathwish as a label (from what you’ve seen)?

Deathwish is a great label. Without our friends there supporting us and releasing our first EP we would be were we are now. We aren’t fans of a lot of the bands on Deathwish, but that doesn’t discredit them or the label. Nothing they release is garbage; it’s more like we just aren’t into it. Now that we have a record on Jade Tree we are getting noticed by a entirely different crowd and people who never even new we existed.

4. Touring is…

Touring is very important for us right now because our record just came out. Our ultimate goal is to be able to find as many people as possible to share and enjoy our music, but it is really hard. There are so many bands touring and it’s hard to try to make your own identity with out playing with the larger bands in our genre. I don’t want to take some of some of someone else’s fame. We want to work hard and play with bands that have no egos. So many bands can’t go out on tour on their own and survive. They only do big support tours and no one really cares or connects with a band if they don’t do their own tour. We might do a support tour here and there, but we are always going to come back through on our own.

5. About how long does it take you to write a song?

Songs can take a few months to piece together so that we are all happy, but we honestly write songs really fast. We are actually taking a break from writing. It’s kind of funny because I always hear bands say "we are taking a break to write," but we are kind of the opposite. Most of our favorite songs are the ones we wrote the fastest.

6. Do you think that there is a big difference if someone watches you guys live as opposed to listening to your record?

There is a huge difference between us live and recorded. Sometimes certain parts of listening to songs can’t be understood until seeing us live. The amount of energy that we all put into playing a show is also extremely important. What a recording is made to do is document the energy and sounds of our band in the best possible way. They you can take a small piece of what we are doing home with you to possibly enjoy on a regular basis.

7. I saw you guys play Providence sometime in 03 and about five people were watching you. About 30 people were up front watching you when you played Providence in February of 04. Have you noticed growing crowds as you continue to tour?

That is a perfect example of if we keep on working hard people will take note and look deeper into what we are doing. What has become really important to us as a band is to play the states and cities that the average band avoids. Maybe some band draws 300 people in Baltimore, but in Delaware they can only draw 100. They decide not to ever play there again… that is lame. Playing music should be about struggling to some degree. I wish we could find the more popular local bands in every city that doesn’t get many shows and team up with them to try to bring some sort of community through music in there lives. We just played to about 80 people in Providence and we had a lot of people asked us when we are coming back.

8. Is Breather Resist a full time band?

Yes.

9. Put these in order of importance: Money, Family, Fun, Growth, Stability.

This is kind of strange, but oh well… Stability, Family, Growth, Fun, and money being least important.

10. Name one album, besides your own, that you think all kids should own.

This is hard because there is always a few that I am obsessing over at all times. I am going to have to go with the Jesus Lizard’s GOAT.

11. Are you going to vote in this upcoming election?

Yes, as everyone should be because we have to get that idiot out of office before we are paying more for it then we already are.

12. Final comments…

Thanks for being interested.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Breather Resist always seems to impress me. Their last record, “Only in the Morning”, definitely set-up where “Charmer” now takes a listener. Without losing a drop of aggressiveness, their debut Jade Tree release brings about a certain lost structural element that inherently thrusts emotion onto a listener. This Kentucky foursome also pays homage to their region with a use of heavily chaotic, yet still translatable, southern guitar licks (ala: parts of “A Social Worker’s Nightmare”). While some people feel that this genre of rock’n’roll, chaotic hardcore is slowly being diluted by the number of scene-point seeking teens picking up instruments, Breather Resist still holds strong as a contender. “Charmer” plays out like a climax to some brawl that was started over something as simple as a sweater or some cheese. Listen for yourself kids! You’ll be able to steal ideas left and right!

Side-note: Possibly some of the best artwork I have seen in recent years; congratulations to their artist choice ?°¦ extremely talented.

Breather Resist: Punk stamina

Punk rock seems immune to market forces when it comes to concerts. Most punk bands price their shows considerably lower than their alternative rock counterparts. Even when someone like Morrissey charges $35 for a show–about $25 less than the average cost of a concert ticket this year–it’s still considered an outrage by those who live by the Ian MacKaye philosophy of tour economics.

"That’s the great thing about punk rock," says Evan Patterson of the Louisville, Ky., quartet Breather Resist. "You can go to shows for a reasonable amount money, and whether it’s good or bad, you get your money’s worth."

Patterson knows a thing or two about gigs. His two-year-old band tours relentlessly, sometimes playing almost two weeks without a day off and canceling shows only when it’s absolutely imperative. It stays focused while on the road, often sticking to the same set list throughout a tour leg, and withholding from writing and recording until it returns home. And he’s been attending shows since the fifth grade.

"When I was 11, I saw my first show," says Patterson. "I saw the light and walked toward it. It’s always been what I want to do. I played guitar when I was 15. When I started going to shows, they were bad, but every month or so, there would be one really great show. That really influenced me and kept me wholeheartedly into it."

You can imagine Breather Resist having the same effect on some punk rock newbie. Its music–a distinctive interpretation of hardcore, laced with punk and metal–is passionately delivered. It conveys particular moods and attitudes, without falling into self-pity or over-the-top rage. And while the songs themselves sometimes meander, often subverting conventional structures and rhythms several times within the same track, its lyrical narrative is largely straightforward. Singer Steven Sindoni shrieks and screeches equal vehemence toward enemies and lovers, untrustworthy strangers and family members–the kind of stuff usually screamed back by the stage-storming youngsters at the shows.

Much of this–sans the mosh pit–can be experienced on the band’s recently released debut full-length, Charmer. Produced by venerable hardcore figure Kurt Ballou, who plays guitar for Converge and has worked with underground faves Cave In and Vegas act Curl Up and Die, the album espouses a chaos where new chord progressions and time signatures are never seen coming, though carefully arranged by the band and Ballou. This reflects the spontaneity the band seemed to embrace in rehearsals and the recording studio; even the musicians were surprised with the results once the record was completed.

"We didn’t set out to write a song with 11 songs that sound like this," says Patterson. "Some of my favorite songs on the album we wrote in one or two practices. When we started out, we wanted to be technical, and I think that will always be there. But, not to sound cheesy, it was more an organic approach to writing music. That really shines through with the record. There’s no tension of the songs. We never write songs to please [someone]. That never crosses my mind."

Nor does the style of the music. Breather Resist may thrive among the hardcore community, but the association isn’t necessarily premeditated. This is where comparisons to nonconformist ’90s alt-rock act Jesus Lizard make sense.

"I think our band has a lot more to offer, as opposed to just being noisy or a heavy band," he says. "With [Charmer], it started to touch more on the side of that kind of music, which is always been an influence. I’ve been in lots of bands, and certain people play certain music together. I think whatever music we wanted to play, we could incorporate it into this band. Who know what songs we’ll have for the next record, or what sound we’ll have."

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Breather Resist reminds me of Converge or another hardcore band that isbrutal but not metal. Maybe Converge is metal. Well anyway, Breather Resist
is hardcore/punk but not metal. It is refreshing to listen to heavy music that isn’t all jud jud and meedely meedely solo’s. I like that stuff too but Breather Resist is more of a mix between Botch and These Arms Are
Snakes. I let a few of my friends hear this record and they really liked the music but didn’t like the vocals. I really don’t like a lot of throaty vocals and these are a bit throaty but not too much so I still like them.
These guys prefer to be called punk and one of the best things about this band for me is this statement that was in the write up that came with the cd – "While some may lump us into being a hardcore bans, I think we’re more
punk rock in the sense that all truly independent music is punk rock, as opposed to one sound?°? having a trademark on the term. When most people think of punk they tend to think of Rancid or one of those bands, but I think the term is more about attitude and ethics." I really like this statement. It was delivered by Evan Patterson and he is the guitarist. He used to play
guitar for national Acrobat, and Black Cross. I liked those two bands but I think that Breather Resist is way better.
8/10

BREATHER RESIST CHARM THE NATION

The Kentucky boys in BREATHER RESIST have only just dropped their caustic Jade Tree debut Charmer (JT1098) and are already headed out the door to destroy both coasts throughout the month. Beginning October 25th in their hometown of Louisville the band will head out to cross the nation bringing to the stage the best live show in town; hands down BREATHER RESIST deliver the single heaviest punch to the groin set you’ve ever seen, so don’t miss these shows!


Please consult the Breather Resist for current dates.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

By now, there is no excuse if you haven’t at least heard of Breather Resist. After a 7 inch and an incredible full length, Only in the Morning, the band went on to do a spilt with none other than the master minds of Suicide Note. If those releases weren’t reason enough to check out Breather Resist, Charmer is sure to draw you in.

Charmer takes the band’s previous works and expands on them. The album screams to a start and doesn’t stop till its completion. Breather Resist not only performs metalcore to its fullest, they seem to be attempting to redefine it. Faster and more brutal than any release I’ve heard this year, Charmer is in fact, a pure joy. Breather Resist breathe new life into metalcore, in the most impressive way since Burnt By the Sun released The Perfect is the Enemy of the Good.

With an opening track like "A Insomniac’s Complexion" the band hooks the listener from the very start, and continues to live up to the energy and brutality of the first track, throughout the album’s entirety. The album’s third track "Midas In Reverse" has it’s slower, yet brutal parts, but "Honest to God" brings the album right back up to speed. "As Far as Goodbyes Go" is easily one of my favorite tracks on the album, and shows the variety and depth of the band’s style.

Breather Resist has seemingly put out the most artistic vision of metalcore I’ve heard since Curl Up and Die’s double EP last year, and the most impressive quality of Breather Resist is that even though they have their obvious immediate influences, the contents of the music speaks for itself, and proves the band to be a rarity, a metalcore band going towards artistic vision rather than the band wagon.

Charmer lives up to it’s title, and shows Breather Resist to be an important entity in the music world, as one of the most unique act on today’s scene. I highly enjoyed this album and recommend it to any open minded individual.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

The first few seconds of this record sound like you’ve stumbled across a passionate, forbidden rite ceremony, when a fierce and feverous applause merges into a drum and vocal intro that coalesces with math-y, eccentric riffs that follow in an unstoppable fury. It’s the same pummelling Botch approach that almost every pseudo-peculiar band of this era (most notably Every Time I Die) have exploited to their advantage. Breather Resist are quick to stray from the contemporary derivative stereotype and it is immediately obvious they’ve captured a different essence within the familiar guitar work. Kurt Ballou (Converge) produced the recording, creating a doom-driven dissonance, using a muddy yet crisp sound to generate a punishing and heavy ambiance. This four-piece from Louisville, Kentucky adventure through technical guitar debauchery and excel with something most bands yearn for: a solid rhythm section. Clever, imaginative bass lines are maintained atop particularly steadfast drumming. There are straight-up rock’n’roll elements worthy of dance, pensive and dramatic moments worthy of reflection, but most of all, face melting, bone crushing, heretical metal that is simply irresistible.

How do you think this album has progressed from the last? Guitarist Evan Patterson: It’s not just us writing extremely heavy songs, we’ve touched more on sounds and more of our influences helped us out on this record. I think on the last record it was more to write an incredibly brutal record and pummelling all the way through and this one we wanted to get a little more personal with the songs and still incorporate. There’s a song we have trombone on, there’s a song where there’s whistling — just a few of the ideas we got in the studio.

You’ve had two splits on other labels this year, what made you choose Jade Tree for the full-length? I think it’s because of their reputation for treating bands well. They’ve always been a label I looked up to since I first started. They do 50/50 profit sharing with the bands. I love listening to heavy music and playing some, and I feel like if we’re on a label we’re gonna be the heaviest band and I feel like it can widen our audience. You know, maybe someone will hear something that might open people up to a whole different kind of music they’d never heard of.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Jade Tree is starting to hit the hard stuff – the musical equivalent of grain alcohol, the kind that burns in your throat like battery acid. Breather Resist is a screamo outfit from Louisville, Kentucky that’s so loud it makes the Blood Brothers run for cover. The record label that brought you the bleak acoustic work of Pedro The Lion and the warm, fuzzy emo of The Promise Ring now introduces a reasonable facsimile of the Jesus Lizard; only instead of the demented story-telling vocals of David Yow, we get interminable yelling and screeching.

It’s too bad the vocals, or what passes for them are so far up front in the mix. My philosophy: if you care so little about them – and the lyrics – that all you do is scream unintelligibly, bury them. They’re no good to anyone. Pare back on the words and take a seat, Steven Sindoni. Let the dense, turbulent guitar work of Evan Patterson — you may know him from the National Acrobat and Black Cross — seethe and roar, like in "An Insomniac’s Complexion" or "Honest To God", two wasp nests of sound so frenzied you feel like you’re in a riot. Or, sit and watch Patterson’s Allow for the powerful squat thrusts of Nick Thieneman’s bass to heave and groan, like in "A Social Worker’s Nightmare" or the Shiner-esque "As Far As Goodbyes Go." And quit smothering the quick-change time signatures and heavy, ebb-and-flow dynamics, especially in the titanic, Dead Meadow-like "Amphetamine Praise", that kept me surprised and riveted.

There is a pattern to Breather Resist’s brand of hardcore mayhem that emerges after a while, and that routine wears on you. Often, at the beginning, is chaos: hard-charging guitar gathers steam and mauls you like a lion. The drums fly apart like parts of a machine that’s been stressed for so long, it simply explodes. All the while, the bass pulverizes you like a trash compactor. Then, suddenly, Patterson comes riding in from out of nowhere – like some cowboy – and lassos this raging beast, calming it by throwing thick blankets of power chords over its back. It still makes for interesting music, but once you’ve figured it out, it loses some of its power to amaze.

But that’s small potatoes. The real problem here is the vocals. You know how some hardcore singers actually sing from time to time, maybe when the beat drops out, and you see the actual eye of the storm. That’s a good time to change things up, to stop the screaming and let loose with a sinister whisper or something raspy. Study what Mike Patton does. Or, better yet, hire yourself a female singer, like Isis does, to add haunting, soothing textures. But, that’s not Breather Resist.

I understand that you have to shout to be heard above the raucous din. Maybe the problem is that I have a fundamental misunderstanding of the genre – it is called screamo, after all. Maybe the reason why the Blood Brothers’ popularity is on the rise is because people want to hear vocals that sound like their being rammed through a wood chipper – chords being shredded like exculpatory files at Enron. I guess I’m not one of them.

Breather Resist [I]Charmer[/I] Review

Loisville, KY’s Breather Resist have been bubbling right under the wide spread consciousness for a little while now. The four piece has been winning over audiences with rowdy performances from coast to coast. And now, in a move that had everyone saying “wha?”, the band signed to Jade Tree. Now, this isn’t the first heavy band that Jade Tree has worked with, but Breather Resist is the kind of band you would think would be more comfortable on Level-Plane or even Robotic Empire. But here we are?°¦ Charmer has been released by the Delaware powerhouse of a label.

Recorded by all around busy guy Kurt Ballou, Charmer is full of menacingly huge riffs that seem to burst your speakers in all of their fuzzed out glory (a gift Ballou bestows on most of the bands he records). The drums and bass punch through the harsh guitar tone with powerful clarity. The vocals of Steven Sindoni sound as though they are being ripped from his throat in a fit of desperation.

?°¦Here is the problem?°¦ I’ve heard this before.

Sure they can site bands like Deadguy as a reference point. Sure other reviews can liken them to Kiss It Goodbye, but there is one little thing everyone seems to be glossing over. This is almost a carbon copy of Botch.

I don’t know if everyone else has been dancing around it because they were happy that they had something to fill that void, but this is just a continuation of Botch. Now, before you misconstrue this into something negative, it’s not. I loved Botch, I know plenty of people who did. And when they decided to toss in the towel, a huge gaping wound was left in the hardcore scene?°¦ ask anyone. It’s just that, well not until now, no one has really attempted the Botch sound. The full, tricky guitar lines back by amazing rhythm section, all fronted by an intimidating, yet wholly engaging, voice.

Now, it’s not a note by note copycat, I don’t want you to get the wrong impression. But, when a review is basically a list of references, I thought I would just make it easy on you. If you miss Botch, this will fill in where they left off.